Posts Tagged ‘Dalston Superstore’

Knickerbocker presents Littlebocker

This Thursday sees Littlebocker, the rebellious little sis’ of Queer Dance Party Knickerbocker, return to our homo-pleasure palace! Since 2015, Promoters Alex Lawless and Aaron Zimbra have been slaying the night with Knickerbocker at their residence in The Yard in Hackney Wick! With queer inclusivity at its core, an irresistible mix of alt-pop, indie-dance & house and a plethora of East London talent having performed on their stage, its no wonder that Knickerbocker has reached iconic cult status. 

For the seventh instalment of our collaborative lovechild, Littlebocker, we thought it was about time we had a ki-ki with Alex and Aaron! We caught up with them to reminisce about the beginnings of this dynamic-duo, their thoughts on masc4masc culture and why they think that the queer scene should be under the sea!

Oh hey Knickerbocker! Could you each tell us a bit about yourselves for those who don’t know you?

Hiyaaaaa. We’re two friends who have somehow ended up DJing and promoting parties together. We’ve both got irregular day jobs that influence what we do –Alex is a producer at BBC Radio 1 (you may have heard him 9pm weeknights alongside Charlie Sloth aka ‘Dusty’) and I’m a curator of performance art for Fierce Festival in Birmingham.

Knickerbocker is our bastard baby love child/Queer Dance Party that we started THREE YEARS AGO (don’t) at The Yard in Hackney Wick. Recently we’ve started a monthly sister night called Littlebocker on 4th Thursdays at Dalston Superstore which is real niiiice.

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How did the two of you meet and start promoting together?

We met very much by chance in Edinburgh in 2010. After a one night stand and me deleting Alex off facebook for a year, its turned into an 8 year sentence, and counting. I’d wanted to start a club night for a little while, but was scared to take the jump, but then my friend Jay (at The Yard) started pushing me to do a night at his venue, and eventually I ran out of excuses, roped Alex in and bit the bullet.

What inspired you to start Knickerbocker?

We’d been clubbing in London pretty hard for a while, but our interest had started to wane: Looking back we were just going to the wrong clubs. We’d often found our women friends feeling uncomfortable in certain male dominated spaces – parties with ridiculous, hyper sexualized, or masc4masc names like PORK PARTY.

We wanted to create a more inclusive space, where our women and non-binary friends felt welcome. At the time we also found ourselves frequently dancing in pubs with bad sound systems – so we wanted to create a party that put the music first. At the time we weren’t exactly techno-heads, and felt that the world of electronic music was a little exclusive but we were also sick of hearing the same 20 party classics on repeat.

At Knickerbocker you hear the alt-pop you love earlier on, and as things get late, we ramp up the BPM and do a lil bit of crate digging as closing time looms.

For those that have never been to your party before – tell them what it’s about (and what they’re missing out on!)

It’s a friendly house party, where anything goes really. It’s a knees up for the mid week partier, a monthly salon for the queer, the interesting and the messes.

If you could change anything about the queer scene in London, what would it be?

Maybe it would be fun if we were all mermaids and it was all underwater and straight people were jelly fish.

 If you had to sum up Littlebocker’s sound in one track, what would it be?

Hmmm, it’s not necessarily a KBR classic, but in terms of getting to the essence of what we’re about I think the Joakim remix of Robyn’s ‘With Every Heartbeat’ is probably a pretty good shout. It’s familiar, but strange and you can get lost in it. It’s a great track for late on when everyone’s slightly worse for wear. It calms people down for a bit before we crank up the dial again.

What has been your favourite release of the year so far?

I’m enjoying Peggy Gou’s It Makes You Forget – bring on summer!

Do you have an all time favourite music video?

Victoria Beckham – Let Your Head Go

 

If you had a time machine and could go dancing anywhere/when, where would you go?

I wouldn’t go back that far to be honest. I don’t fancy dancing to a fiddle and flute in a tavern humming of sewage. Maybe Weimar Berlin, but I guess Liza Minnelli wasn’t actually there and it didn’t turn out so well in the end. Probably David Mancuso’s Loft – it certainly inspired Knickerbocker a bit. Though actually I was reading about Grace and the illegal raves she threw in the 90s with the DIY Collective recently that got them branded the ‘most dangerous people in Britain’ – that sounded like a good time.

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Who are some of your favourite performers in the East London queer scene at the moment?

Excuse the inevitable omissions, friends, but we love Eleanor Fogg, Victoria Sin, Edythe Wooley (Manly Stanley), Ellis D, Jamila-Johnson Small, Lucy McCormick, Thom Shaw aka Pam Lustgarten, marikiscrycrycry and of course HRH Oozing Gloop and our own ARTIST IN RESIDENCE Katy Baird. There’s a real rigor, inventiveness and political edge to all of their performances – and they’ve all performed at Knickerbocker at some point. Oh and I literally can’t stop laughing whenever John Sizzle walks onto any stage. 

In three words or less, what should we expect at the next instalment of Littlebocker?

Communal Liquid Gold

 


Catch the Littlebocker DJs at Littlebocker every fourth Thursday of the month from 9pm-2:30am at Dalston Superstore

 

Sindri

Next Friday sees the Clash Bash queens return their forth mismatched instalment, SEXY SHAPES! Headlining this asymmetrical experiencé, is LA based DJ & nightlife extraordinaire, Sindri! Having been at the forefront of LGBTQ+ nightlife for 15 years and playing at iconic parties across the pond such as Dickslap (Seattle), Honcho (Pittsburgh) & Blow Pony (Portland), there’s no doubt that Sindri is going to unleash some algebraic absurdity in our lazerhole! We caught up with them to chat about their involvement in Taylor Mac’s ‘A 24 Decade History of Popular Music’, meeting Róisín Murphy and what techni-coloured garms we can expect from them at their Superstore debut!

Hey Sindri! We’re stoked to have you joining us soon for Clash Bash! Can you tell us a bit about yourself?

I’m pretty much all things nightlife. DJ, party promoter, performance artist, avid dancer on a Friday night, sweating it out! Been twirling in different facets of club land for about 15 years now. I have a couple residencies and parties I throw in LA, and I dabble in making short films and party promo videos. My newest venture is learning to work with neon and making some fierce art pieces out of that, which I’m really excited about!

You have been involved in Taylor Mac’s “A 24 Decade History of Popular Music”! That’s incredible! Can you tell us a bit about your involvement? 

Yeah, the whole Taylor Mac experience was amazing and truly inspiring. The show is a very particular retelling of history through an exploration of popular music from 1776 to present day. Though told through a very glittery and eccentric lens and done in a 24 hour format. It’s the kind of show that takes audience participation to the nth degree! With surprises around every corner and some of the most over the top costumes I’ve ever seen. I was a “dandy minion” and was in charge of doing anything from handing the audience ping pong balls that they’d later throw at Taylor Mac, to helping hold up a giant 20 foot long inflatable penis around the house, to finding an audience member to make out with during Purple Rain! Taylor was an absolute sweetheart to work with and so genuine, I felt so honoured to be one of the 24 people chosen.

You have played at some of our favourite queer parties across the pond, from Honcho Pittsburgh to Dickslap Seattle and Blow Pony in Portland. What are some of your favourite dancefloors to play at?

I always have the most magical time playing and performing in Provincetown, Massachusetts for Bear Week. It’s a very storybook little New England harbour town that gets taken over by the gays every summer and attracts some of the most amazing queers from all over the world. I dj at Fagbash which has been a staple party there for the past 10 years. It’s also become a tradition that I perform at the massive Horse Meat Disco party that happens during Bear Week! 

What has been your career highlight thus far?

Hands down meeting my music and style icon, Róisín Murphy! I’ve been a big fan of hers since her Moloko days. She rarely comes to the US, and many silly Americans don’t know who she is. I’ve kinda been a major advocate of hers from my SF days, spreading her gospel by throwing many drag tribute nights in her honour, playing her catalogue at the clubs, or making my own fan music videos, one of them going viral to her then unreleased song Simulation. Kinda doing all these things to get her attention oversees, and during a time when Youtube and Instagram were barely coming into existence. It’s to the point now where everyone I know thinks of me when they see or hear anything of hers, and that suits me just fine! I got to throw her an after party for the end of her American tour in 2016. She hadn’t been to the states in 8 years. I got to meet her backstage at the show and then party with her afterwards. It was surreal, and she was everything I hoped she’d be. We got to hang again the next year she was in LA, and we keep in touch online and love to share music with each other. We might even share a pint at a pub while I’m in London! 

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You made the move from San Francisco to LA about five years ago. How has that move impacted on you musically and creatively?

Yeah around 2013, after living in SF for 11years, I decided I needed to “grow up” a bit and start fresh in a place where I wasn’t as known. To kinda test myself and see if I can make it in a bigger pond. San Francisco was the perfect incubator for a queer creative mind, but it was time to really spread my wings. I wasn’t even sure I’d find a like minded community of freaks and music lovers down south. But I did, and it’s been such a rewarding journey. There’s just so much to tap into in LA that the possibilities are endless. It can seem daunting how big it is, but I like that challenge. Even after you’ve stuffed your face with one nook of the city, there’s still so much more to discover. It keeps you on your toes. It’s kinda like you can choose your own destiny. But of course it’s still up to you to work at it. It just inspires you to keep doing more!

You’re playing one of our most colourfulparties, Clash Bash. Will you be packing a special outfit for the occasion? 

I’m really excited to come play Clash Bash! Especially with ShayShay being a California native like myself! Although this particular trip to London I’m not bringing my alter ego Ambrosia Salad, her costumes usually require a whole other check-in suitcase. I will be flashing some serious colour wheel and haute boy drag! 

What does your queer utopia look like?

It would probably look like every set from Dario Argento’s cult horror classic Suspiria! Haha except without all the murders!

 

If you had a time machine and you could go dancing anywhere/when, where would you go?

A Bacchanal in Ancient Rome would be fun! But all the of the music I like wouldn’t have been invented yet. So maybe I’d enjoy transporting myself to Italy in the late 70’s early 80’s during the birth of Italo Disco. And hopping across the Atlantic to New York City for a bit of leather bar cruising in the West Village.

You’re taking us on a date in LA. Where are we going to eat/ drink/ dance?

Okay wow let’s see. Mimosa brunch and pool moment on the roof of The Standard Downtown. Packing a dinner and having a picnic at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery. Starting the night at Bar Mattachine for my weekly residency Salad Saturdays (shameless plug), then heading to my favourite underground, Spotlight, till the wee hours. If anyone’s sober enough to drive after, maybe make our way to Malibu to catch the sunrise.

In five words or less, what are you planning to unleash on the Superstore basement?

All-u-can eat funky beat.


 

Catch Sindri at Clash Bash no.4 ~ Sexy Shapes Friday 25th May from 9pm-4am!

 

Favourite Superstore moments from our special guest DJs!

Our East London queer-topia is diving head first into her tweens, and this Bank Holiday Sunday it’s our Ninth Birthday Bash! After nine years full of all-star special guests, heartwarming fundraisers, drag debauchery and all-nonsense brunch extravaganzas, we are cramming all the best of Dalston Superstore into TEN HOT HOURS OF MAD BIRTHDAY SHENANIGANS! This line-up of infamous faces including Wes Baggaley, Fannar, Rachael, Goldsnap, Chaka Khan’t, Super Drama, Michelle Manetti and A Man To Pet continue to be at the forefront of LGBTQ+ nightlife and have thrown some our most iconic BANGERS over the past nine years. But the real question is, what brings them back? 

We asked them to spill the tea on what they really think of our homo-pleasure palace and what we can expect from them on Sunday! 


 

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Fannar 

My favourite experience or night in Superstore would have to be all the Meat nights, obvs! But when we did meat New Year’s Eve and my mother came down only to stay few hours but ended watching me for five hours while I pretending to be all cool and professional, and when she left that was the end of me, and I crashed out in the DJ booth! Very professional, innit! Til hamingju med afmælid Superstore! 

 

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Wes Baggaley 

I love Dalston Superstore and feel really honoured to have been asked to play at the birthday bash for the second year running. I love it so much because it’s so much more than just a club. You can go there during the day and work on your laptop or just hang out, get food, have drinks or even look at the gallery. It’s all things to everybody. There’s a real sense of inclusivity and a proper community feel. No matter what time you go in you, will always see somebody you know. Not to mention the banging soundsystem in the basement with some of the best, most forward thinking LGBTQ+ nights in the country. My favourite memory of Superstore was playing back to back with Dan Beaumont at the eighth birthday party last year alongside my DJ heroes Derrick Carter and Luke Solomon. I’m really happy to have been asked back to play with the badass Nadia Ksaiba. Here’s a picture of my alter ego Tina Turnip with some of her best friends at Superstore. 

 

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Rachael 

I’ve been part of the Superstore family since the third birthday!  The first time I was invited to play the birthday party (AKA the best party of the year), I was so honoured that I knew I had to pull a very special set out the bag. So I composed a vinyl love letter to Dalston Superstore. My set included Womack & Womack’s Teardrops because the very first week I worked there, we went bowling and all ended up in the karaoke booth in Rowan’s singing it at the top of our lungs. I played Sharon Redd – Can You Handle It cos Dan Beaumont bought me that record for my 30th birthday. I played Pointer Sisters – Dare Me ’cause that was basically on repeat on the disco daytime playlist every day for about three years straight. EVERY.SINGLE.RECORD I played during that set meant something to me about my time there, and every time I’m invited back to play is a goddamn delight!

 

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Goldsnap

Our favourite memory of Superstore is a hard one to pin down. One of them was at the beginning of Goldsnap. There was a lot of hype around it, and everyone was excited to have a new weekly night. People were so hyped they were falling off chairs, balconies… it was chaos, but so much fun! Also, I (Gin) distinctly remember playing Beyonce’s Blow and everyone going wild.
 
We keep coming back because of gigs and of the friends. It’s definitely a safe central spot to meet people, and we know the family. One of the most important things about having a queer space, is keeping it queer. I appreciate that Superstore has a safer spaces policies and actively tries to make sure the customers feel safe. We’ve also met a lot of new friends through Superstore, some of whom have really helped me throughout our respective careers and been there as support. I appreciate the family that keep Superstore going, and I hope they are able to celebrate with us on Sunday!
 
 
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Chaka Khan’t 

Trying to isolate one memory at Dalston Superstore is near impossible, so I think I’ll have to settle on a few! I was stalking the Superstore website and dreaming about partying here long before I even arrived in London. When I started the job – first as a bartender – I knew that I had found an amazing queer family that was going to change the course of my time in London. In the last five years here, nearly all of my greatest memories are of parties in Superstore. Whether it’s setting up my own Tuesday night party Disco Spritz and DJing for the very first time, thrashing around on the bar countless times, discovering the genius that is Grizzle, establishing an incredible extended family of beautiful characters, or spending many hours well into the next day at my very first Superstore Birthday Bash, it has been a wild ride so far. I can’t wait to see what the next year holds in store!
 
 
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Super Drama 
 
After a chance meeting with Chaka Khan’t and Dance Armstrong in a tent in Wales, we soon began playing at Last Resort and Disco Spritz. Our favee memory of Superstore is the party last year when Jerome ripped the back of my (Jon’s) shirt in a perfect square and got multiple compliments off people thinking it was a really strong and fashion-forward look. We keep on returning to play Mints with our amazing dance troupe of K’wality, Kety Perry, Lexy and Pinky Bits who are all hosting the birthday party on Sunday.
 
 
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Nadia Ksaiba

My first memory of superstore was Jonjo’s Hot Boy Dancing Spot‘s construction party, I’m not sure they had finished building but I just remember being jealous of my friend Rory as he went. My favourite experience would have to be one of the Optimo parties back in 2010 that may have started on a Friday and carried on ’til Monday! The Superstore basement is still one of the most underrated clubs in London, there’s always something good going on for £5! I keep coming back because it really is like like family. It’s always good to hear a Dan Beaumont set at a Superstore birthday! 

 
 
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Michelle Manetti 
 
Superstore is by far the most fabulous queer space in London. Fèmmme Fraîche has made a very comfortable home there and the DSS team have always been super supportive of what we do. It’s such an important venue for the London queer scene and i’ve made so many friends, danced wayyy too hard on far too many occasions, and had one-too-many sambucas countless times, but she’ll keep coming back for more. I’ve been partying hard at Superstore since its doors first opened nine years ago, and it’s always a pleasure to DJ and even more of an honour to play at the birthday party, so I’ll be spinning my finest tunes for such an auspicious occasion (just keep pouring me those sambucas!)
 
 
 
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A Man To Pet
 
My first memory of Superstore was the first night that it opened! I remember every single person who was there, and now the most of them are way too old to go out I am so thankful that drinking the coconut water from the bar there keeps me youthful!  My favourite memory is the salmon breakfast and the Basic Boys riming each other on the bar and synchronised swimming with John Sizzle! I won’t say anymore.  Gurl is nine years old and I’ve spent more than 1000 nights either working or dancing there. LOVE SUPERSTORE, more than the glory. Thanx and bye.
 

Catch all these special guests and more at Dalston Superstore’s Ninth Birthday Bash this May Bank Holiday Sunday from 7pm-5am! 

 

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LOFT

This Friday sees the first instalment of MEGALAST, our brand new extravaganza from J. Aria + Ni-Ku! Expect extreme bass, acidic explorations and alien club music. Headlining this experimental, abrasive, uncompromising and trip-inducing experience is LOFT (Astral Plane)!

Following their first release in 2016, the queer Mancunian producer has been quickly making waves. With their mixes encompassing rave birthed drum programming, experimental electronics and kylie edits, their style is renowned for its uniqueness.  Having featured in both Crack Magazine and Mixmag, as well as an EP with the label Wisdom Teeth and contributions to the Astral Plane compilation, LOFT is trailblazing the experimental music scene. More recently, LOFT was given the ultimate seal of approval: Björk selected their track Funemployed alongside the most innovative artists in the game, including Arca and Kelela, in her Mixmag cover mix

We caught up with the experimental producer to chat about their performative DJ sets, their experience of being visibly queer in the nightlife scene and what we can expect from Friday!

 


 

 

Oh hey LOFT, we are SO excited to have you at Dalston Superstore! If our readers aren’t acquainted, can you tell us a little bit about you?

Hello hi friends , I am Joeli and I do the LOFT thing. I’ve been doing it since I was about 14. I make stuff that has the privilege of Wisdom Teeth and Astral Plane Recordings’ love, support and distribution networks.

You’ve been making music since you were 14?! That is quite awhile! Do you have any highlights to your DJ career so far?

Playing in a pub in Lancaster for the drummer of my dad’s best friend’s new krautrock excursion ; playing at a club in Athens where people don’t show up until 2AM at the earliest ; playing in the home HQ safe haven that is The White Hotel on numerous occasions with only the best lineups.

 

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You must have been introduced to some talented DJs, do you take inspiration from anyone?

I’m big into feedback loops , I like listening to Ariana acapella tracks , I’m honoured to be surrounded by people as talented as Anastassia Radtsenko IceBoy Violet, Acre, Forrest Lloyd ,Hesska MICHAELBRAILEY, Szare ; Manchester is fertile atm.

You’re known for having a really unique mixing style, how did you develop this and what is your process in choosing tracks and creating new pieces?

When I was 17 I was a vinyl purist , I’ve done a lot of live “ controllerist “ live sets . I hope I can offer something more dynamic than either of the above these days . Honestly I’m just scrambling for the next tune that will make any ( or no ) sense against the preceding track . 

 

There seems to be almost a theatrical element about you at the decks. Did you intend to integrate performance into your sets?

I get drunk and write poems sometimes and occasionally I perform these to an audience . My main aspiration is to make people feel so included that tears roll from their little eyes . 

Queer Femme producers are at the forefront of the Manchester electronic music scene at the moment, with Castles in the Sky seeming to be paving the way. Have you found solidarity and support through other queers at the top of the game?

Yes absolutely, I would argue that queerness requires no explicity and as such most of the people that have chosen to work with me over the last couple years are at least “ queer sympathisers “ . Love and support is strongest feeling I get from everyone I work with. 

How have you experienced being visibly queer in the nightlife//club scene?

Y’no what ? it’s been alright , sure I experience some weird stereotyping and code switching ( I always find it funny when someone’s like “ Oh honneeeeyyyy “ and I’m ale drunk and respond in a fairly deep northern vernacular ) but within my surrounding club culture I feel pretty safe . The bad shit happens outside of that . 

 

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From your experience playing around the UK and abroad, how do you think queer nightlife can be improved?

More queer spaces in cities outside London . Manchester has a huge gay scene but , as I’m sure we all know , queer =/= gay . BOYGIRL we building it .

So, what would your queer-utopia look like? 

Cop out answer : I couldn’t possibly comprehend . I’d make a comment about it requiring the pursuit of each individual’s ideals but that sounds a bit Randian now doesn’t it ?!

Finally, what can we expect from your premier DJ set at DSS?

Fun , tears , hugging each other , maybe a couple minutes white noise .Honestly I’m so honoured to have been invited.

 


Catch LOFT at MegaLast: LOFT, KRY, NI-KU, ELLES + J.ARIA this Friday at Dalston Superstore 9pm-3am!

 

Jaye Ward plays all night long at Patsy!

by Whitney Weiss


Sweetie Darling! This Friday sees the ABSOLUTELY FABULOUS globe-trotting, multi-generational queer club experience, PATSY, return to the mothership! This time around they are passing their champagne flute to London’s rising DJ Star, Jaye Ward who will be playing whatever the hell she wants ALL NIGHT LONG! Having her roots set in Hackney, Jaye has been involved in music for the best part of the last 30 years, playing the Club Dog parties in the late 80s, through to working for record shops, to DJing and promoting since the 90s.

More recently, she’s been playing a rolling schedule of clubs and festivals, including being a regular face at Superstore! PATSY resident Whitney Weiss caught up with Jaye to tap into her encyclopaedic music knowledge, to find out how she delights dancefloors around the world,  summer plans at the first edition of Albanian Festival Kala and how to charm her with a mixtape!

Hello Jaye! Let’s bring it all back to the start. What’s the first album you ever bought? Where did you buy it and what was it like listening to it for the first time?

I think it was Chic – C’est Chic so that’s 1978, I think. From G&M records in Mare Street, Hackney. I LOVED that shop. I had been allowed to buy 7”s before then. Things I mainly heard on the radio (I mean, I was 10). Pop/disco was huge whenever we went on holiday, mainly holiday camps on the south coast. Obviously I got it for Le Freak. It was on the radio ALL the time. And I loved the photo of the band on the cover—they looked so smooth. I was obsessed by Alfa Anderson lying on the floor in the split skirt. Beige was HUGE back then. When I first listened to it, I remember being disappointed that there wasn’t anything else HUGE like Le Freak on it, but I soon got DEEP into those minor chord changes. It’s still maybe one of my all time favourite LPs for the reasons above and for one of my favourite tunes EVER, At Last I Am Free. I have all sorts of versions of the track… the sublime Robert Wyatt version still sends shivers!

Is there a record that reminds you of when you first started going out clubbing?

I was clubbing before acid house but once that happened all bets were off regarding iconic records as it was like someone had turned the taps on full! But even now 35+ years later, if I ever here GO BANG loud, preferably in a club setting, I’m transported back to warehouses full of dancers from all tribes of nightlife getting their dance on… now THAT’S an iconic record!

What songs do you have playing on repeat at the moment?

God, I’m listening to so much as usual but am currently obsessed with that Tommy Awards II record – both sides are psychedelic beauty. The new MC TALLA NAN CREAG thing that’s going to be coming out on Firecracker is immense too. Been going through loads more dance floor style stuff too for me taking over the basement of the mothership for Patsy and it’s been ace to rediscover (sort of) old records that I remember sounding great loud. Also this week I’ve had the first five Bad Seeds LPs on repeat too… I love Nick Cave. I’m doing a remix for MAN POWER at the moment and so far it’s got a swampy Bad Seeds type of vibration to it, so that’s fine by me.

Your taste in music is just so pleasantly well-rounded. What do you think is the most surprising or unexpected record in your collection?

That’s nice to say, thanks. I think that’s mainly because I’m so old! I’ve always liked joining the dots and happily I still seem to be able to put things together that sound like they wouldn’t go well but in reality connect beautifully. I could easily play the same sounding things for ten hours but I’d be bored out of my skull, let alone punters. I like it when a dance floor or room has that up, down and left to right kind of flow to the evening. It gives people a chance to breath and smile. I think there’s nothing that’s too surprising popping up in my collection seeing as I’ve always gone for the weirder end of things. I do have EVERYTHING done by Toyah though, does that count?

What’s the one record that never leaves your DJ bag because it is 100 percent guaranteed to delight a dance floor?

Ummmm there’s quite a few things that are regulars in my box and now permanently on my USB keys. Flim Flam by Yellow Sox on Nuphonic blew me away when it came out and still does EVERY SINGLE TIME. I reckon it’s one of the best house records EVER made. Fight me. Song for Annie by Erot is of its time but still makes people come and ask me what it is. An ace vocoder version on Chic’s At Last I Am Free is a permanent resident, too. Most of the time I try to vary what I play as much as possible. I guess that’s what has always, up to recently, made me either a hard booking in that I’m VERY balearicly minded even though I don’t really play that sort of thing that much or that I’m super flexible. Not sure. Ha!

Speaking of delighting a dance floor, what’s a record that brings you great joy?

The Chance by Reel Houze on Zoom Records. It’s like an edit of Go Bang with extra drums from Harvey.  A lot of that mid 90s UK nu-disco stuff was and is amazing. The mid 90s was when the quality control suddenly shot up I reckon. It’s one of my fave records still and I’ll drop my lollipop headphone and go dance for 10 minutes or so if I put it on, it’s still immense. Hearing Glenn Underground, Danny Wang, Maurice Fulton or any of that super deep dub instrumental US house over an ace system WILL make me cry. Make It Last forever by Donna McGhee will definitely make me go sploosh too.

If someone fancied you and was making a mix tape (or CD, or Spotify playlist, or USB), what song they could choose that would really charm you?

IF someone fancied me, especially lovely funky queer ladies who have a penchant for tiny women of a certain age, making me a mixtape containing old 80s post punk love songs (they do exist, trust), lo-fi jazzy experiments, deep spiritual jazz, weirdo stuff, dub, lovers’ rock, songs by Nick Cave or the goddess Lydia, old blues and any curve balls of their own would make me blush and then stalk them… y’know.

What’s a record that makes you think of one of your most iconic nights DJing? And if you don’t mind my asking, what was that night like?

God that is hard. Lots of lovely evenings out where certain records have had people singing along or psychically combining to actually change the atmosphere into something like I imagine The Loft would have been like. Mind Fair’s Secret All Night Carnival Version of Spike’s Fooling Around on Gold Channel has that Loft feeling. It’s SO beautiful. Upstairs at Patsy I’ve played it a number of times and people have sort of stopped drinking and swayed all together and danced in a jazzual way, which you can imagine is a bit of a feat there for hyped-up beautiful queers hell bent on a weekend of damnation.

I was in Cyprus playing records for the ace Whizzy Wig crew last month and everyone was dancing and it was very much ace! People screaming, etc. We were all playing lots of jazzy house, disco and Trax style funky acid classics. I played Loose Joints Is It All Over My Face? – the bloke version – and people lost their shit. That was a fun moment. That record nowadays seems to do that for everyone I think. I love that people into dance music of all kinds are now up to speed with how disco really was the source for everything we listen to. Books with huge chunks about David Mancuso, Nicky Siano and Larry Levan etc. have really opened people’s minds to how everything is connected. It’s ace!

What song have you always wanted to hear someone else play out so you could have a dance in public to it?

God there are so many. I play it, but I’d LOVE to here someone randomly play Vinceremos by Working Week. I’d loose my shit totally and sing along, arms waving aloft. Scoops in Columbia by Plaid would have me kicking my shoes off and running to the floor making sure my boob tube was still up—amazing record loud! Random plays by other people is my absolute fave thing.

If you had to choose one album to listen to all summer long, what album would it be?

Ummmmm, wow, another hard one! The loft box sets, ha! Calling Out of Context by Arthur Russell, Colossal Youth by Young Marble Giants, North Marine Drive by Ben Watt, Nothing Can Stop Us by Robert Wyatt or Neil Young On the Beach all have summer vibrations associated with them for me. So maybe them. Tomorrow I may feel differently.

Speaking of summer, what’s a record that you’re really excited to play at the first edition of the Albanian seaside festival Kala this summer?

Not sure yet. I’m taking a seriously wide range of things because they have me playing at various times and in various situations. I really want to get to play glacial electronic stuff alongside pretty songs when the sun goes down under the stars. Living in London I very rarely see stars and really want that scene to happen.

What’s one song that you wish you would have written? Do you write music ever?

I mess about making things. Edits for myself to play. Mainly extensions of things. I have zero musical chops apart from having a good ear for things I suppose. Musicians blow me away. My friend Margo is a producer and amazing musician. She talks about stuff to do with composition and I have to work hard to keep up. Totally in awe. I could easily list a hundred songs that make me go ‘Whoa! How?’ And easily a thousand dance records that I have no idea how they came up with what they came up with. People who do this are living, walking gods to me. In the Bad Seeds film 20,000 Days on Earth there are two moments within that one LP alone where he’s singing songs that they are still working on – Higgs Boson Blues and Give Us A Kiss – where my hair on my arms have sat bolt upright and I’ve started to cry. When he sings Jubilee Street at the Sydney Opera House. The words “I’m vibrating I’m transforming” make me eternally jealous. But to be honest, I’ve had 40 years of records making me feel this way.

 

What record makes you think of PATSY?

God, lots of records! But the first time I played records for PATSY and played I Need Somebody to Love Tonight by SYLVESTER, not only did people dance but a few started singing along and I thought YES!!!


Catch Jaye Ward at Patsy on Friday 20 April from 9pm-4am at Dalston Superstore!

Northern Soul Rave Patrol

This Saturday, we are thrilled to present the top floor debut of London house, disco and soul institution, Northern Soul Rave Patrol. Having played host to the likes of Andrew Weatherall, Sean Johnston and Doc Sleep over the past year, the Tusk crew have become synonymous with dark, deep, quality programming, and we can’t wait to see where they take us in 2018. Promoter and resident Ant C caught up with Chris Sweet and Will Nicol of Northern Soul Rave Patrol ahead of Saturday’s TUSK to chat London clubland, dream gigs, and record bag classics!

Hi guys! I hope you have been enjoying your Easter. Have you been out and about to any parties over the long weekend? What, where and who was playing?

CS: Yes, it’s been a big bank holiday weekend. Started with Jill Brook at our weekly Thursday night party Record Box at The Eagle, which is a vinyl only night playing Torch Song disco, sleaze/ morning music and hi-NRG, influenced by classic clubs like The Saint, Paradise Garage and Heaven. Then Patterns in Brighton on Saturday where Horse Meat Disco have a residency and then back to The Eagle for the packed HMD bank holiday party with Heidi Lawden over from LA – so lots of fun and good music.

WN: Went to see Gilles Peterson at Dreamland in Margate on Friday at the newly refurbished Hall By The Sea.  It’s an amazing venue – closest comparison would be the Box at Ministry but with a decent bar in the same space.  Some great tunes and we really enjoyed ourselves. Saturday I was DJing at Cinque Ports, again in Margate, which was fun although Johnny Henfry (Synth System Sisters) got me into all sorts of trouble!

Where did the idea for NSRP come from and how would you define your sound?

CS: About eight years ago we formed NSRP to reflect the music we loved and the scenes we had been into from soul to disco and house. It’s me, Will and Sean Leonard. We realised we had been friends since the mid eighties mod and Northern Soul scene and 100 Club. Then all got turned on in 1988-89 with the acid house and rave scene, inspired by the madness of Nude night at The Hacienda, Quadrant Park and Will at Shelleys. Plus amazing parties like Boys Own, Sign of the Times and NY house clubs like Body&Soul, Sound Factory and The Shelter through Sabresonic and up to A Love From Outer Space and Horse Meat Disco. All those clubs have soundtracked our lives and influenced us – we love house music but with some heart and soul and a dash of disco. 

If you could play any gig/party/venue anywhere in the world, past or present, where would it be and who would be on your ideal bill with you?

WN: Hacienda 1989 :-)

CS: Ha! That’s a hard one as if we had the nightclub time machine there are a lot of destinations we’d want to plug in… From Manchester’s Twisted Wheel or Wigan Casino or Blackpool Mecca for Northern Soul, to Chicago’s Warehouse to hear Frankie Knuckles or Ron Hardy, but probably the maestro Larry Levan at the Paradise Garage must be the place, to paraphrase Talking Heads.

London has seen a huge amount of change in clubs and clubbing over the past few years, with the closure of many venues. Is this all just part of a repeating cycle in line with current politics, or do you think London is really changing permanently this time?

WN: I think the whole UK club market has changed enormously in the last 15 years – I don’t think it’s just London.  The massive growth in festivals and kids looking for the “big event” rather than a weekly club to call their own, has caused a huge shift.  In London with the economics of gentrification this is multiplied. I think it’s a shame, but then I’m an old git!

CS: I think the relentless rise in house prices in London and redevelopment has led to the loss of so many clubs and music spaces, which squeezes the nightlife out of the city and prices people out. It seems a shame London is becoming a bit sanitised like New York, unlike Berlin. That’s why it is so important for key venues like Dalston Superstore and The Eagle that support quality music and are welcoming spaces. 

WN: London is a versatile and ever changing city, so it will adapt or mutate and re-emerge like dance music culture has over the decades. As Kerri Chandler said, really you just need a red light, a basement and music with feeling – we know Dalston Superstore and TUSK tick all those boxes!

What is one track that never leaves your record bag, and one new one that excites you right now?

CS: A total classic would be The Night Writers – Let the Music Use You (Frankie Knuckles mix).

Lots of great recent music but two that I love and have that emotional content of electronic music with soul would be The Black Madonna – We Still Believe. 

and Sophie Lloyd feat Dames Brown – Calling Out.

WN: Soul classic: Ann Sexton – You’ve Been Gone Too Long.

Modern: HiFi Sean & David McAlmont – Transparent.  Sean’s a friend of both of us and he’s in a rich vein of form right now.  This is a Record Store Day exclusive we’ll definitely be playing it at TUSK.


Catch Northern Soul Rave Patrol’s bar takeover at TUSK on Saturday 07 April from 9pm-3am at Dalston Superstore!

tusk at dalston superstore

Ellis D presents Drag Makeup Demos!

This Thursday, we are beyond thrilled to welcome local East London drag superstar, Lowstakes Festival curator and performance artist Ellis D for a crash course in drag makeup! Expect ‘Low Budget, Lower Concept Last Minute Glam’ from our resident superstar thrifty MUA. She’ll be running through top tips and tricks for executing a flawless face on a budget. Everyone is welcome, and it’ll only set you back a fiver! We caught up with her to chat witchcraft, performance platforms and sources of inspiration!



Hello gorgeous! We can’t wait for your Drag Make-Up Demo this Thursday! You’ve been SLAYING the East London drag scene for years now, but how did it all start? Let’s hear your DRAG-HERSTORY babes.

I started doing drag in 2012(13?) because it seemed like an accessible stage, it’s amazingly easy to find yourself subjecting a packed club to utter trash only two weeks into your illustrious drag career. After a couple of solo ventures I ended up in the Yeast London Cabaret with Oozing Gloop and Rodent DeCay which is where I got most of my terrible librarian drag out my system. Back then it was lipsync or nothing, I was really inspired by performers like Dickie Beau and 2boys.tv. Recently I’ve fallen out of love with lipsync in favour of a semi-improvised, reactionary, ritual mode of performance (performance art – you know the gig). I’ve taken work in that style to performance festivals a few times now and I’m continually frustrated and inspired by it.

The Glory’s cult drag competition LIPSYNC 1000 has now become a phenomenon, and you were its very first winner! How have you developed as a drag artist since that experience?

I wouldn’t perform the act I won with now – it was a little slow and stationary which I do kind of love, my favourite thing is a queen who plants her feet – too many people panic on stage they try and lay claim to every inch by stamping a heel on it and that will always look awful. Be statuesque. But that said it just wasn’t considered enough, it needed a better structural cohesion & a stronger visual – it relied almost entirely on the lip sync precision – which was obviously flawless because I don’t enter competitions I don’t know I’ll win. I had a lot more self-confidence (read: delusion) back then.

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As well as your own work, you’re quite the community queen! Last year, you were one of the curators of the Lowstakes performance festival, which provided a platform for upcoming performance artists! Can you give us the DL?

Lowstakes is a performance festival that I run along with Edythe Wooley and Malik Sharpe. The first iteration at New River Studios was a two-day affair with ?25 artists showing new and developing work. We followed that with a club night at VFD which returns this month on the 23rd. The first festival was done with no money at all and our approach was to programme as many people as we possibly could and work it out on the fly. I’m confident that we had the largest programme of new performance work anywhere in London. We want it to be as painless as possible to access and are always looking to take risks – sketch us a doodle and promise us a show and there’s a good chance we’ll programme it. The two day festival returns in June this year, with the open call to be announced imminently and this time we know what we’re doing. 

From tarot card reading at TUSK to WITCHY performances down the road at VFD, Ritual seems to be the main theme of your recent performances. Can you tell us how this has become the subject of your work?

At first it was a practice of self-care, I found the meditation and goal visualisation of spellcraft helpful, and still do to an extent. I’m not as submerged in it all as I was a year or two ago, but I find the structures and beats of ritual are useful skeletons around which to build performance. The danger being you fall into the trap of spiritual display and exhibitionism which always makes for the most unbearable stomach- churning horrendous work. Mythology has always been what I return to when making new work – I’ve always been obsessed with Norse mythology and read a lot when I was younger, I’m interested in how fictions might inform future socio-political forms, a process called fictioning. Spellcraft is a fictioning, a story told to manifest change. I think performance can do the same.

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We are absolutely GAGGED by the LEWKS you’ve been pulling, where do you get your inspiration? 

I am continually inspired by a whole host of folks. As much as I enjoy makeup, I’ve never really studied it or put much effort into researching references and I am blissfully oblivious to any makeup greats but to name a couple of Instagram favourites: Imp Kid, Nico, Yuri Guaìí. I’m also always here for a Siouxsie Sioux graphic liner moment or a Nina Hagen blush. For the most part I just make it up as I go and trust I’m soaking in influence from somewhere.

Drag-Makeup tutorials are everywhere on YouTube, but they definitely aren’t the most accessible to queens who are new to the game! How will your tutorials help beginners in a rush and on a budget ?

Okay here’s the deal… I’m not Miss Fame, I’m broke as hell and I have very little patience for makeup. Expect tips & tricks, shortcuts and knock-off products. They’ll be as accessible as I can make them for beginners, I’m not giving myself three hours to tinker away –  this is ‘just finished my shift and have two hours to be in face, dressed and out the door’ makeup. I want people just starting out to have a real shot at recreating the look straightaway. That said I can blend a base with the best of ‘em so they’ll be gorgeous no doubt. 

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2018? Give us a sneaky peak of what’s in store for Ellis D.

 Alongside returning to and nurturing my performance practice and continuing to platform some of the best performers and friends I have the honour of knowing 2018 is all about becoming a much pricklier customer, oh and padding. 


Join Ellis D at the “I Have How Much Time?” Drag Demo this Thursday 15 March from 7pm in the Dalston Superstore basement for £5!

Tusk Turns Three!

This February sees an important anniversary of one of our favourite parties, Tusk! Promoters Ant C, James Baillie and Chris Camplin have been bringing over some of Europe’s most impressive underground electronic music talent to our lazer basement for three years now! With previous guests including Andrew Weatherall, Craig Richards and Doc Sleep, we can’t wait to see what they have planned for 2018. They’re kicking it all off with Ostgut Ton legend and Dalston Superstore favourite Prosumer! We caught up with the boys to chat past highlights, favourite club nights and 

You guys have been throwing your TUSK night at Superstore for three years now! That’s awesome, happy anniversary! How did the three of you meet and start promoting together? 

Ant C (AC): Thanks! Time sure has flown. It’s been a lot of fun. Thanks for having us! I’ve known the boys socially for years from out an about around London.

Chris Camplin (CC): Yeah, we would bump into each other at our favourite dance floors – in fact I think I met both James & Ant at Horse Meat Disco initially. I know James came back to my place for a post-HMD afterparty one bank holiday Monday.

James Baillie (JB): It became obvious we all had a love for music, so I took the idea to Chris and Ant about us doing our own night and TUSK developed from there…

For those that have never been to your party before – tell them what it’s about (and what they’re missing out on!)

CC: Amazing music, great DJ lineups, stellar crowd, lasers and that awesome DSS basement sound system.

AC: Yep, that pretty much sums it up. We just want people to have as much fun as we’re having. I do love me some lasers! We bring in some extra lasers for TUSK and the boys have started calling me Laser Minelli. I kinda like it!

If you had to sum up the TUSK sound in one track, what would it be?

CC: For me it would be – Tiga – Love Don’t Dance Here Anymore (C2 Remix 1)

AC: Tough question – I think it would have to be Markus Gibb – Tohl (Original mix) – Always seems to go off, plus I tend to layer it up with a vocal loop from Voodoo Ray, which fits nicely.

JB: For me it would be Shake It by Fantastic Twins.

Who have been some of your favourite guests over the years?

AC: We try to keep things fresh by working with people who have something individual to bring. Doc Sleep was awesome – she really worked us out. Ewan Pearson for his musicality. A Love From Outer Space (Andrew Weatherall and Sean Johnston) when they took over the basement all night for our Pride Special in 2016. Ketiov was great too and a world exclusive for us!

CC: Ketiov, Doc Sleep & Nail have been some of my faves.

JB: A Love From Outer Space, Craig Richards and Doc Sleep.

Has there been an overall highlight for you?

CC: Being able to book some of my favourite DJs and producers at one of my top clubs.

AC: As Chris says, being able to work with some of the people we have admired for years. Everybody has been super nice and its been interesting to hang out and chat with them about their experiences and get their advice and input.

Your special birthday guest is Prosumer – why did you choose him to ring in your fourth year?

CC: I think Prosumer has a special place in all our hearts and we’ve been discussing booking him for some time now and everything just landed into place!

AC: Yeah – absolutely. I met him at Glastonbury a few years ago and we got chatting and stayed in touch. I think he liked what we were trying to do with TUSK and seems much more open to working with people on that basis, rather than just going for the huge shows. I tried to make it happen during 2017, but we couldn’t make the dates line up – so the third birthday party seemed the perfect choice to have him with us!

What are some of your favourite club nights in London at the moment?

CC: Of course at our sisters Discosodoma and Homodrop at Superstore are up there along with the legendary Horse Meat Disco.

AC: All of the above. I’m also enjoying the residency programs that XOYO and Phonox are running – its interesting to get somebody else’s take on who to put together to make a cohesive night of music.

JB: Similar really – A Love From Outer Space, Chapter 10, Discosodoma and Horse Meat Disco.

Any DJs that you would love to work with in the future?

CC: Sure, we have a big list forming. The Honey Soundsystem guys, Midland, The Black Madonna, Octo Octa.

JB: Felix Dickinson, Black Merlin, Job Jobse, Superpitcher, Massimilliano Pagliara.

AC: The list goes on – Jennifer Cardini, Justin Robertson, Optimo, Mike Servito, Marcel Vogel, Derrick Carter – who knows? Watch this space…

Are you pulling out any special surprises for your birthday that you can let us in on?

AC: Now that would be telling…

JB: I’ve got a good few head melting tracks that are not coming out until Spring…

CC: You’ll have to wait and see!    


Catch Tusk at their Third Birthday Bash on Saturday 24 February from 9pm-5am at Dalston Superstore!

Patsy’s Sex Tape! An Interview and Sensual Compilation by Protopapa and Whitney Weiss

by PATSY


For our love-soaked February edition of PATSY, we’re welcoming back international dreamboats Protopapa and Whitney Weiss. To build your anticipation, we’ve asked them to make you a sensual mixtape and talk to us about music for romantic occasions. Read on to get yourself in the mood. 

Hi Protopapa! Hi Whitney! How are you both doing?

Protopapa: Hey CIAO! I’m feeling great, answering you from my second home, NYC.

Whitney Weiss: I’m good, I’m in Paris getting ready to DJ with Kiddy Smile later tonight!

Okay so I’m gonna ask you about some songs so we can build a sensual PATSY Valentine’s Day mixtape together. What’s the song you want played for the first dance at your wedding, if you’re into subverting traditional marriage? 

P: Marcel Vogel – Body to Body (rework of Shades of Love – Keep in Touch) to set the right sensual mood. Even my 70 year old auntie could feel the sex vibes.

WW: Without taking into consideration the musical tastes of the person I’d be marrying, Sade’s The Sweetest Taboo or The Boss by Diana Ross.

Hey Protopapa, what is a song that you put on in Italy that consistently makes people on the dance floor hook up with each other? 

Matia Bazar’s Ti Sento. They sing and dance and make out to it, it’s like an orgy of mouths and tongues.

Whitney, you’re really into the song Horny. Can you tell us a little bit about how it makes you feel and what version you prefer? 

It makes me feel joyful and unashamed. On special occasions, I like to take people by surprise with the extended mix, which has like 2 and a half minutes of the popping bubbles noise before you figure out what’s going on.

Patsy thinks that nothing is sexier than Prince. What is your favorite Prince song?

P: C O N T R O V E R S Y !

WW: In terms of pure sexiness, Darling Nikki or International Lover.

What’s the last song you played on repeat when you had a crush on someone? 

P: Elbee Bad – Just Don’t Stop <3

WW: Radio Dept’s Pulling Our Weight.

If you were both making a mixtape for a romantic interest, what is one song you would definitely include? 

P: Kiss You All Over (Whitney Weiss ’til the night edit). I lost three teeth saying this.

WW: Ahahahaha grazie amore. There’s an edit of Abel’s I Gotta Woman that I’d need to include 😉

If a romantic interest were going to serenade you with a song, what song could they choose that would make you have a moment and cry?

P: Oliver Koletzki – Hypnotized. But it should be a ukulele version.

WW: I’m going to say Modigliani (Lost In Your Eyes) by Book of Love just because answering with another Prince song seems like A LOT of Prince.

What song makes you feel sexiest when you play it out while DJing?

P: Moscoman – Rerotica

WW: Prince – Erotic City

Protopapa, you’re closing one of your Eurocrash parties in Milan and want to play something tender that will make everyone hug and feel connected. What song do you choose? 

P: Lucio Battisi – Ancora Tu.

Whitney, what is the most romantic song we can expect you to play at the next PATSY?

WW: L’Amour – Let’s Make Love Tonight.

Here’s the extra-special Valentine’s Day Mixtape Protopapa and Whitney Weiss made for us:


Catch Whitney Weiss and Protopapa at Patsy on Friday 16 February from 9pm-4am at Dalston Superstore

Mozhgan’s Top Tips For Successful Raving

We can’t wait for notorious rave institution DISCOSODOMA to return to the mothership with an almighty bang this February, as they welcome Iranian-born San Franciscan party maestro Mozhgan to the lazer basement! As the DJ and promoter behind We Are Monsters, she has seen a meteoric rise to success, with sets at Honey Soundsystem and Sunset Sound System catapulting her to play at Berlin’s Panorama Bar, NYC’s Output, Burning Man’s Disco Knights and beyond. The Discosodoma crew caught up to quiz her on her top tips for successful raving ahead of Saturday’s Discosodoma Loves We Are Monsters.

1. Drink water! Hydration is key.

 

2. Wear comfortable shoes.

 

3. Pace yourself. Slow and steady wins the race… 

4.  Deodorant, chap-stick, mints or toothbrush and toothpaste can rejuvenate you when you’re feeling not so fresh. 

5.  Snacks 

6.  No parking on the dance floor

7.  Put your phone away

8.  Sharing is caring

9.  Sunglasses – you never know what time you’re going to leave the party, these can be essential when facing the outside world.

10. Have a good rave buddy – someone that will have your back in case things get a little bit too wild…

 

Catch Mozhgan at Discosodoma this Saturday 10 February from 9pm-4am at Dalston Superstore!

 

Sonikku

By Pavliné


With his music soaked in tropical sounds and releases on labels such as Balearic dream curators Distant Hawaii Sonikku and SWEAT look like a match made in heaven. Headlining this takeaway edition alongside Al Zanders, the Lobster Theremin affiliate talks pop music classics, video game soundtracks and time travel!

Hey Tony, we can’t wait to have you back! You’ve played at Dalston Superstore several times and also at Chapter 10.  For those who might not know you, could you tell us a bit about yourself and your Sonikku moniker?

 SONIKKU is a musical hybrid of Sonic the Hedgehog and Madonna.

Listening to your tracks (in particular Dilemma), it’s obvious your music is widely influenced by pop music. Could you give us  a few examples of the perfect pop album according to you?

First Album – Madonna 

Body Talk – Robyn

Bad Girls – Donna Summer
 

Any pop song you think works especially good on a dance floor?

I love the Instrumental of Katy Perry’s California Gurls, and more recently I’ve been playing ‘I Don’t Want It At All’ by Kim Petras

 Seeing as you described your sound as a musical hybrid of Sonic the Hedgehog and Madonna, any particular video game soundtracks you would recommend to our readers?

Final Fantasy VIII, Killer 7, Ghost in the Shell (PS1), Sonic 3

2018 is very nearly with us. What does the new year have in store for you musically??

 I have three EP’s scheduled for 2018 and I’m currently working with a pop star I really admire.

 What can we expect from your set at Superstore?

 I haven’t played much of my tropical music for a while, I’m looking forward to revisiting those sounds for SWEAT!

Can you think of a track that would fit the tropical and hedonistic aesthetic of SWEAT?

Holiday – Madonna 

And finally, the classic Dalston Superstore question: if we had a time machine ready to take you to any dance floor, past present or future, where would you like to go and why?

Probably Tokyo in the year 3017 or something – and also London 2007 in the Plastic People days – Wish I was old enough to have experienced that period.


Catch Sonikku alongside Al Zanders at SWEAT this Friday 5th January from 9pm-3am at Dalston Superstore!

 

Al Zanders

At the heart of winter, the SWEAT crew is bringing the heat to Dalston Superstore with a sun-drenched double bill! Headlining this takeaway edition alongside Sonikku, the Wolf Music and Phonica Records affiliate, Al Zanders, will be serving disco and trippy house in the laser basement. Sweat head honcho Pavliné caught up with him for a tequila sunrise, and to find out what to expect from him at his Superstore debut!

Hey Alex! First of all and for those who might not know you, could you tell us a bit about yourself and your DJ career?

I’m no salesman, but I make funky, deep and sometimes ethereal house music, as well as edits, all designed to be enjoyable on a dance floor. I tend to DJ a variety and don’t like to stick to one genre or style, so you might hear anything from techno to broken beat.

You’ve recently moved from Sheffield to London. How is the music scene there compared to here in London?

I’ve actually been living here 18 months already. I’d say Sheffield is more communal because of its size – everyone knows everyone. London is a very different kettle of fish.

We are a huge fan of disco edits at SWEAT and your edit of Tangerue ‘Doin Your Own Thing’ is truly amazing. You released it under the Lodger moniker, can you tell us a bit more about that?

Thanks! I personally don’t take a lot of pride in edits, they’re just for me to DJ with. Lodger was the first alias I ever made years ago – and I’m probably not going to release under that moniker again, as I’m too focused on my own productions as AZ.



Your latest EP on Phonica Records had an impressive reception upon it’s release. What was the idea behind the tracks?

Thank you – they were inspired by DJ Shadow, the way he layers samples together from vastly different areas of music into one song, creating an interesting blend. Like that beef custard Joey eats in Friends – wrong but somehow still works…

What does 2018 have in store for you musically??

An EP with one of my biggest musical heroes, the first release on his label in 16 years, plus some fun edits and a track I’m working on with a singer that I’m very excited about. So a lot!

What can we expect from your set at Superstore?

Depends what you guys seem to like, but I’ve been enjoying a lot of trippy techno recently so maybe some of that mixed in with my usual flavours.

Can you think of a track that you might slide into your set to fit the tropical and hedonistic aesthetic of SWEAT?

Try this!

Finally, our classic Dalston Superstore question: if we had a time machine ready to take you to any dance floor, past present or future, where would you like to go and why?

I’d maybe go to see the Co-Op guys at Plastic People, but they seem to be making a comeback now – so no need for the time machine!


Catch Al Zanders alongside Sonikku at SWEAT on Friday 5 January from 9pm-3am at Dalston Superstore!