Posts Tagged ‘Derrick Carter’

Bottom Heavy

On Saturday, the Laurel and Hardy of Dalston and legendary DJ’s, Dan Beaumont & Wes Baggaley,  are joining forces to get you all bumping and thumping to some deep homosexual house with their brand new night: Bottom Heavy! Having both been prominent figures in London’s queer nightlife for over a decade and played some of the most infamous parties around the globe including The NYC Downlow, we are pretty sure that these two bottoms know how to throw a TOP party.

Despite their quite sickening resumés and having been pals for years, its actually the first time they’ve collaborated together! Don’t worry huns, this isn’t the only venture for the duo. Later in the year, Dan and Wes will be playing back-to-back at Farr festival alongside Prosumer, Tama Sumo and Lakuti! 

To get you lubed up and prepared for Bottom Heavy, Dan and Wes had a little chinwag amongst themselves! Read on to find out what these two legends think about the state of London’s LGBTQ+ Nightlife, their most played records and whats on the horizon for them both!

 Dan: Can you remember the point in your life that house music grabbed you?

Wes: I do actually. I was still at school and too young to go clubbing but I remember when Steve Silk Hurley’ ‘Jack Your Body’ and Raze ‘Break For Love’ were in the UK charts and on Top of the Pops. I remember the video for ‘Jack Your Body’ having a bucking bronco in it. Then there was the whole acid house /rave thing in the tabloids. I became mesmerised by it. I used to buy 7-inch singles every week with my pocket money from being really young and I remember buying ‘Jack Your Body’, ‘Love Can’t Turn Around’ and Inner City ‘Good Life’ on 7inch. The first house music 12 inch I bought was Lil Louis ‘French Kiss’ in 1989/90 which I still have and still play.

Dan: I remember all those weird cartoon videos they threw together for those Chicago house records that became hits. Also remember thinking ‘who is Steve Silk Hurley and why isn’t he in his video?’ Then I got totally obsessed with Betty Boo.  

Wes: What inspired you to open Dalston Superstore? 

Dan: I met Matt and other Dan (DSS co-owners) when they were running Trailer Trash, and I was doing a party called Disco Bloodbath. As promoters, we often had problems with venues, and talked a lot about starting our own. Eventually we began looking in earnest and around 2008 we found the site that became Superstore. It had been empty for a couple of years before we found it. We just wanted to create a space where the people who came to our parties would feel at home, where the music, drinks and food were all good and our friends could be themselves.

Dan: What sounds are you looking for when you go shopping for records to play out? What are you trying to communicate through DJing?

Wes: That’s a tough one. I like a really wide range of different music and play various styles but when I’m looking for sort of functional dancefloor records I tend to be drawn to quite energetic stuff with lots of percussion. I’m a massive fan of the old Cajual, Relief and Dance Mania Records and always tend to gravitate towards that type of jacking type sound. I also like disco and I’m a sucker for a disco sample but I don’t like playing the same sound all night. I just tend to play what feels right at the time, could be soulful, disco, acid, techno, hypnotic deep stuff, jazzy stuff, ravey breaks type stuff, broken beat, African percussion.

Wes: You’re partly responsible for some of the best LGBTQ+ parties around at the moment including my favourite, Chapter 10. What are your thoughts on LGBTQ+ clubbing in London at the moment, especially with a lot of venue closures in the last 5 years? 

Dan: I personally think that LGBTQ+ clubbing is very inspiring right now. Adonis, Discosodoma, Homodrop, PDA, Femmetopia, Gay Garage and loads of others are all pushing underground queer music and culture to new places. Unfortunately the gay scene is still affected by misogyny, internalised homophobia, body shaming, transphobia and masculine bullshit, but it seems like more interesting voices are starting to come through, which means more creativity and more talent steering queer clubbing. Also it’s exciting to see groups like Friends of the Joiners Arms, Resis’Dance, and London  LGBTQ+ Community Centre (all rooted in queer dancefloors) disrupting the status quo.

Chapter 10 Dan

Dan: What do you think are the positives and negatives of LGBTQ+ clubs right now?

Wes: I also think it’s a very good time for LGBTQ+ clubbing at the moment. In spite of a lot of the recent venue closures there are great nights popping up in non LGBTQ+ clubs. Seems to be a sort of creative DIY culture happening which is great. There same is happening in other cities like Manchester with great nights like Meat Free at the White Hotel and Kiss Me Again at the Soup Kitchen. There’s some great music events and brilliant cabaret stuff going on at the likes of The Glory and The RVT. As you mentioned, the internalised homophobia, transphobia and misogyny needs to be addressed. A lot of the fetish venues have closed down and some of the bigger LGBTQ+ fetish nights in London are struggling to get venues. I do think this is a vital part of the culture that is dwindling. I reckon we need a LGBTQ+ fetish rave with good music. 

Dan: Good point about all the amazing queer parties outside of London!

Wes: Can you tell me some of your favourite producers and record labels at the moment?

Dan: Labels: Lionoil, Let’s Go Swimming, Lobster Theramin, E-Beamz/Hothaus/UTTU, Not An Animal, Ransom Note, Sound Signature, Stillove4music, Dolly, The Corner, Work Them, Mistress. Producers: Telfort, Powder, Mr Tophat & Art Alfie, Jay Duncan, Midland, Jonny Rock, LB Dub Corp, Stephen Brown, Garrett David, Steffi, rRoxymore, Pariah, and everything Luke Solomon touches. Loads more that I’ve forgotten!

 

 Dan: I love it when you find a record that you know intimately from the first bar to the outro, and it does a really long stint in your bag. What are your most played records over the past couple of years?

Wes: I’ve got a few of them. I’d say my absolutely most played record is Braxton Holmes and Mark Grant –The Revival on Cajual, which has never left my bag in 20 years. I actually need to replace it because I’ve almost worn it out. Also the Maurice Fulton Syclops ones, Where’s Jason’s K, Jump Bugs and Sarah’s E With Extra P are go to tracks but luckily he’s just released another album of gems. The man’s a genius. There’s Kinshasa Anthem by Philou Lozolo on Lumberjacks in Hell that came out a couple of years ago that I’ve played a lot, and then there’s that Danny Tenaglia remix of Janet Jackson – The Pleasure Principle that I’ve owned for many years but didn’t know what it was until I heard you play it at Phonox haha

Dan: I’ve totally stolen The Revival off you. It’s pure magic.

Russia Wes

Wes: Tell us a bit about the idea behind Bottom Heavy. What can we expect?

Dan: The main idea is so we can play together all night and I can steel your tunes! Whenever I’ve heard you play, I can hear a sound in between all your records, a sort of energy that I’m always searching for myself. It’s hard to describe, but it exists in the space between that jacking Chicago sound, leftfield Detroit stuff and tribal New York tracks. Plus also jazz, afro, techno, electro and disco elements. As we mentioned earlier, here are loads of great gay nights popping off, but I think what’s missing is a really great HOUSE all-nighter that joins the dots between all those sounds. 

Wes: Haha! Well there’ll be a lot of tune stealing going on because I’ve been known to have a sneaky peek through your bag as well. 

 Dan: Back to your earlier point about Fetish nights. Why are they important to the gay scene? Are there any you remember particularly fondly? If you were to throw a fetish party, what would the vibe be?

Wes: With the fetish thing I thing it’s important to have those spaces where you can dress up and sort of act out your fantasies and do whatever you want within reason. I’m actually not massive into the sexual side of it myself believe it or not, but I do like the spectacle of the whole thing and the dressing up and the fact people are free to express themselves sexually at those nights without judgement. Sadly a lot of the fetish nights are also men only parties that go hand in hand with the whole gay misogyny thing. 

 A few years ago me and my friend Lucious Flajore put on a fetish night at The Hoist which is now closed. The night was open to everybody, gay, bi, trans, heterosexual men and women. The soundtrack was dark disco, slow brooding techno and weird electronics in one room where we also had alternative cabaret and showed art house horror movies and in the other lighter room we played disco and showed John Waters films. 

 The atmosphere was great but we had problems with the sound and there was no dancefloor to speak of then the venue closed. We also had a problem with heterosexual men complaining about gays (I know right? At the Hoist!). I am actually thinking about re-launching the party at a new venue and putting in a good sound system but making it more LGBTQ+ focused and making sure people know that women and trans people are more than welcome 

Dan: That sounds amazing. You need to make it happen!

Dan: OK last one from me. Who is your biggest DJ influence?

Wes: That’s really tough but I have to say Derrick Carter. I first heard him play in about 1995 and became obsessed. I loved the way he seemed to mix different styles with ease and mix the records for ages.

Dan: I used to go to his Classic residency at The End religiously, and would always try and describe tunes that Derrick played to people in record shops the following week. I never had any luck. I was probably trying to describe about three records being played at the same time.

Wes: And for my last one I’m going to fire that question back at you and also ask if you have any music coming out soon?

Dan: I’ve got a bunch of music nearly finished that I need to sort out. I’m going to lock myself away and do that. Arranging tracks does my nut in. 


 Catch Dan & Wes at Bottom Heavy Saturday 23rd June 9pm-3am at Dalston Superstore!

The Black Madonna

By Dan Beaumont
 
The Black Madonna has had quite the year in 2014. We fell in love with her from afar via some standout mixes, stellar word of mouth, on-point interviews and through booking all of our favourite DJs at Chicago’s legendary Smart Bar, where she just happens to be talent buyer by day and resident by night. She makes her first appearance in the lazer pit on January 3rd so we thought we’d have a look inside her record box…
  
A record where the vocal gets you every time?
Hit It N Quit by Jamie 3:26 and Cratebug.This is one of the best records ever made and the vocal is scorching. It’s really become a signature record for me. 
 

A record that reminds you of when you first real dancefloor experience
Bizarre Love Triangle by New Order. I remember spinning around on a dancefloor when I was 14 in a tiny club in Kentucky when the arpeggio comes in. Heavenly experience. It sticks in my mind clearly over 20 years later. 
 

 A record that is forever Chicago
Gotta go with The Percolator by Cajmere. I used to have a Percolator ringtone on my phone and when it would go off it didn’t matter who was around. Grandmas in the grocery, bus drivers, teenagers: everyone knew just what it was. I think it’s the national anthem of Chicago. 
 

A record that was passed to you by a DJ mentor
You know, I wasn’t really friends with my mentors. My “mentors” were people who made the mixtapes I loved. I learned to DJ essentially completely alone in a college radio station. So many records I play came to me from knowing the sets that my “mentors” played, but I don’t think any of those were ever given to me. I had a lot of DJ friends, but I wasn’t lucky enough to have a close, trusted mentor in that way. 
 
A record that who’s lyrics could be about your life
Getting Away With It by Electronic.
 

An album you listen to from start to finish on a regular basis
Metro Area, Metro Area. I heard this right when it came out. It appeared in my local record store in Kentucky, Ear Xtacy (RIP). It actually took me a while to warm to it. My ears just weren’t ready for the whole idea. What made me really pay attention was the use of Miura in a DJ Hell mix. He did something with that record that framed it for me in the way I needed to have it framed and suddenly the whole record made sense. I think no matter what I do as a producer, I’m still returning to this record. As a producer, as a listener. 
 

Your favourite Smart Bar anthem
You Can’t Hide From Yourself, Teddy Pendergrass. Our main man Derrick Carter rinses this one. I have several specific memories of him dropping this in his legendary 7 hour sets. No bassline has ever been bigger. Those stabs. The horns. It’s pure Derrick.
 

A record that’s missing from your collection 
The 12″ of Losing My Mind by the Pet Shop Boys. I have never owned it, believe it or not. I probably have dozens of PSB records, but this just isn’t one of them. 
 

A record that you can’t listen to because it makes you too sad
What’s Going On by Marvin Gaye.
 

Join The Black Madonna for Battered Sausage alongside Severino, Nadia Ksaiba and more on Saturday 3rd January at Dalston Superstore from 9pm – 3am.

Alinka

One half of Chicago’s Twirl, partner-in-crime to Shaun J Wright and celebrated DJ and producer in her own right, Alinka finally joins us here at Superstore for B(e)ast! Having just quit her day job to focus on making music alongside launching Twirl Records with Shaun, she took a moment out of her busy schedule to talk to us about dancefloors and DJ booths, the importance of her hometown, and of course, the Classic Music Company and Derrick Carter…

Who are your UNSUNG house heroes and why do they warrant more appreciation?

Well I’m very much obsessed with Hard Ton and Mamacita’s music right now. I wouldn’t say they’re so much unsung heroes because they’re doing amazing things and are definitely out there in the world, but I think they deserve all the attention and more because their sound is so unique. There’s so much music coming out these days and so much of it just sounds similar or fits a formula. I think what they’re doing is really creative and special, and I really want everyone in the world to hear it and appreciate it as much as I do!

My unsung DJ hero is definitely Michael Serafini who owns Gramaphone Records in Chicago, he’s by far one of my favorite DJ’s. I’ve known Michael for about 14 years now. I used to skip school to go hang out at the record shop when I was starting out. He would help me pick out tracks, and put away little side piles for me because back then you’d have to fight for all the new stuff and you know I was young and quite little haha. He’s finally getting the attention he deserves. I know he just played Panorama bar recently for the first time and has been traveling quite a bit. He’s just a great person and an amazing DJ that deserves the spotlight.   

Let’s have some positivity instead of eliciting a DJ rant… what makes you full of love?

Shaun J. Wright makes me full of love! Since we met and teamed up, the series of events that have transpired, the people I’ve met, the music we’ve made, all the experiences collectively have been the most amazing and significant in my life. I’m very grateful for that. It’s just been really positive all around and I know that energy and love flows into the music we’re making. I’ve definitely sat down and cried listening back to songs in the studio, and we’ve had many moments where it just feels really magical.  I don’t think I ever really quite fit in or found people I completely relate to musically and in life until the past few years because of meeting Shaun. Not to say I didn’t have great friends and mentors prior, but my newfound little music family around the world has really inspired me and made me feel complete.

We previously had your sister-in-Twirl, Shaun J Wright, playing at B(e)ast here at Superstore- how do you plan to turn it out even more than he did?

Ha! Shaun is an amazing DJ and performer! I don’t think I can honestly say anyone would turn it out more than Shaun, but I’ll do my thing and give you a little piece of Chicago!

What’s had the biggest impact on your sound- the city of Chicago or Shaun J Wright? Or are they inextricably linked?

They are definitely linked! I’ve lived in Chicago since I was eight years old. It’s tattooed on me in a few places, I would say it’s in my blood at this point. I learned from watching DJ’s like Derrick Carter, Heather, and Justin Long so I think my style of DJ’ing is very much influenced by Chicago. Chicago house is what made me fall in love with dance music and basically give up any chance of a basic life (thank god). Shaun has had the most impact on me as an artist. I had taken a break from dance music for a few years because I got really burnt out and I wasn’t feeling inspired by the music that was coming out at the time. I was really down and unsure of where I wanted to go musically and in life. I really didn’t feel like I fit in with what was happening around me. Hercules and Love Affair was pretty much the only electronic music I would listen to at the time, I thought it was so epic. It got me through some difficult times and made me feel like there’s a light at the end of the tunnel. I never actually thought I would meet any of those guys, it was never a goal or anything I just really loved their music and it was monumentally important to me.

Flash forward a few years… I was in this band when my manager at the time Scott Cramer said “Hey Shaun J. Wright just moved back to Chicago you guys should do something together”.  I looked at him like he was crazy for not thinking of this earlier and keeping this info from me haha! Three years later here we are. I was so nervous to work with him because I admired him so much as an artist, it really pushed me to become a better producer. He gave me the confidence to finally make the music I always wanted to create. He really brought it out of me. He’s constantly inspiring me to grow and evolve as an artist and a human. I would say meeting him has been the most impactful thing in my career and my life generally. As you can see there’s a lot of love there haha!

Can you talk us through the evolution of Twirl?

Twirl started out as a monthly party from Shaun, myself, and our good friend Mr. White, with the help of Scott Cramer and our host Sissy Spastik at Berlin Night Club. We started it because we wanted a fun space to DJ together and wanted to showcase some of our favorite DJ’s and friends that weren’t necessarily playing in Chicago as often as they should. We just wanted to do something unique that fit our style. Berlin Night Club and Scott allowed us to really be creative and do our thing. We were fortunate to be able to bring in Eli Escobar, Lauren Flax, Heather, Derrick Carter, JD Samson, The Carry Nation, and a long list of DJ’s we really love. It recently evolved into a record label because Shaun and I were making so much music we wanted to give it a home of its own. We love working with other labels, but nothing compares to having full creative control over your own tracks and really working on every part of the release from the ground up. It’s been really amazing curating remixers and just being involved with every bit of what goes into the process. Luckily we have a great team that works very hard and supports one another. It’s gotten a pretty amazing reception thus far so hopefully we’re doing something right!

You’re taking us out in your hometown… where are we going, what are we doing? What are your Chicago musts!

Ok so I’m a huge foodie and there’s so many amazing restaurants in Chicago, but there’s one I bring every (non-vegetarian) guest to when they’re in town. It’s called Au Cheval and it’s my absolute favorite! Best burger in the universe, though really everything there is amazing. Now that we’re not hungry, we’d have to go to Gramaphone Records and pick up some classics. I hardly play vinyl out of the house these days but I’m still a collector and anyone visiting me likely is as well. It’s just a part of Chicago history you can’t avoid if you’re a music fan. After we’ve gotten that fix we’re off for drinks at Wang’s. Wang’s is my favorite bar, it’s our spot. We have a song called Wang’s On Broadway coming out on Classic Music Company next year, so obviously Wang’s has been an inspiration! It’s just epic. Our friends Banjee Report and Men’s Room have thrown some great parties there. Wang’s is a must. If you can still walk after this there’s obviously some great clubs in Chicago. Smart Bar, Primary, and Spy Bar are all doing great things on the regular so if you’d like to go for a dance then I’d head to one of those. Outside of that I spend most of my time at home in the studio so you’re more than welcome to hang out at my apartment with Shaun and I plus ‘The Ratners’. I have two cats and a dog currently, which I refer to as ‘The Ratners’ or the children. Anyway, you’re all invited! 

How did you come to be part of the amazing Classic family?

I met Derrick Carter when I was 19 through my friend DJ Dayhota who was dragging me around town to lots of amazing places I couldn’t get into on my own. Being illegal and very curious wasn’t always easy, but with the help of great friends anything is possible. Her and Derrick were good friends and I was still very fresh to the scene and learning about house music and life in general. I remember I had drinks with her and Derrick one night and then I went to Gramaphone Records a few days later and that record 10 had just come out on Classic with his picture out it. Whoever was working at the time rushed over and told me I had to get this record, and in my head I was like whatever I just had drinks with that guy no big deal, because I was actually that clueless at the time. Then I listened to it and basically bought every record on the label I could get my hands on, and he became my favorite DJ. The label has a massive section in my record collection dedicated to them and Music For Freaks. I’m a huge fan of Luke and Derrick and the artists they’ve had on the label. Classic and Cajual really changed my life.

Anyway, when we finished our first EP we sent it off to Derrick who then passed it onto Luke. We didn’t really know if they’d even listen to it but we like to aim high and luckily they picked it up! It was a dream come true for me honestly, and it was really encouraging that our first project was going to them. It meant a lot. It’s just been an amazing experience working with them, and I’m really looking forward to our second EP on the label and hopefully others to come. 

We managed to secure you a time machine and you can visit any dancefloor for any point in time! Where/when are we setting the dials for?

Oh wow my own time machine! First I’d go back and buy all the Air Jordans I can no longer afford, then we can go dancing!  To me the best decades were the ’80s and ’90s and I’d have to get to Chicago, NYC, Detroit, and definitely tour the clubs in the UK. I got to go to The Loft last year thanks to my friend Will Automagic, and that was an amazing experience! Honestly my time machine would probably be flying in circles trying to figure it out with a mild hangover like we were trying to decide on brunch. Life is hard sometimes. Thankfully we’ve had some amazing dance music come out throughout the years to make this decision nearly impossible. 

Speaking of dancefloors, who has been your most musically out there guest ever at Twirl?

This is a difficult one. They’ve all been pretty out there that’s why they’re our friends.  Musically I’d have to say Tiffany Roth of Midnight Magic. She’s really incredible and her track selection is brilliant and very versatile. 

What is your ultimate DJ booth horror story?

Ooh I have a good one! This happened recently actually. I’ve never been one to understand the ‘request’ thing but I try to be as polite as possible about it when it does happen. Like if I’m playing at your house or your brother’s birthday party then fine I could see a reason for asking me to play your favorite song which you just heard 10 times in your car on the way to the party. But luckily we’ve moved past that point in my career when you show up at the crowded club. Anyway, I was opening for Roy Davis Jr to a packed room. About half way through my set I could see this group of girls in front of the booth staring at me like they wanted to have a chat. I knew where this was going so I continued mixing and didn’t pay any attention to them. A minute later I could see long dark hair to the side of me in the DJ booth and of course I thought it was my friend because who else would force their way into a tiny DJ booth at a packed club when they don’t know the DJ. Please visualize a tiny space where there is definitely not enough room for two people to stand unless one is being pressed back into the wall.

All of the sudden the long hair started getting closer and I turned my head to notice not only is this not my friend but she’s now pushing me off to the side and leaning over the CDJ’s reaching out to her friends while laughing and trying to have a conversation with them like reality has just left the building. As I’m in shock and staring at this person with a look of confusion while also in the middle of a blend, she elbows the CDJ stops all the music and then continues her conversation as well as hovering and bumping into me and the gear at which point I have to restart the track and everyone is staring at both of us. I asked her if she knew that she was in the DJ booth and why she was there. Instead of having any kind of remorse she turned to me and said “I’m here to make a request” with a very eager look on her face, to which I responded “Absolutely not.” This did not register and left her in shock and unwilling to leave at which point I knew we would never be on the same page. So it ended in her getting escorted back to her circle followed by her making evil eyes at me while all my friends and I shook our heads in disbelief while mouthing “Unbelievable.” She still didn’t understand why anything was wrong with any of this and thought I’d done her a great injustice by not letting her back in or playing her song. I’m not sorry.  

Join Alinka for B(e)ast at Dalston Superstore on Saturday 6th December from 9pm – 3am.

Long-Lost London House

By Manu Ekanayake

House music is a culture in this city: the DJs, the clubs, the dancers, the fashions – they all play a part in London’s fascination with this thing called ‘house’, which is so central to all the dancefloors we love so dearly. But when all’s said and done, when the media stops caring (or starts to miss the point), it all comes down to music: the tracks we hold in our hearts; the ones that make us smile and make our hearts race every time we hear just a few bars. If clubbing is about anything, it’s about that: the special feeling the right record can give, distilled into a sonic tonic that can be administered over many hours, or even days, in the right hands, i.e those of our favourite DJs.

So it was to them we turned, to better explore some highlights of London house tracks of the past. Music is such a personal experience: one person’s tune can be another’s audio nightmare, but these guys are all past masters at making a dancefloor move, of shaping your nights out with the right track for the right time, at making you smile and making you move.  They’re also good friends of DSS (and our stylish sister venue, Dance Tunnel), so we asked them to share tracks they know and love, but that you probably don’t. 

The results are illuminating, to say the least, as they reveal as much about our city’s love affair with house as they do about the music itself. And with the powers that be squeezing nightlife ever-harder, there’s never been a better time to remember what we’re doing here in the first place. These are the tracks that brought us together; the tracks that remind us that ‘house’ is a feeling – one that London must never lose. 

DSS’ favourite acid house hero-turned afro-futurist, Ashley Beedle goes back to ’91 with a tune that bought different crowds together… 

Shay Jones – Are You Gonna Be There

Ashley: Produced by the legend that is Steve ‘Silk’ Hurley outta Chicago, this track has a beautiful vocal and a bumping groove that really crossed the soulboy /original garage-head divide. It came out when things were getting a bit ravetastic, to say the least. At the time, I was managing Black Market Records (the house section). This was a breath of fresh air and we definitely sold quite a few boxes. It even made the swingbeat b-boys from downstairs come and check it out! Hahahaha. I remember hearing people like Jazzie B, Phil Asher, Keith Franklin, Kid Batchelor, Frankie Foncett, Norman Jay, Coldcut and the Boy’s Own crew drop this killer, to name but a few. It wasn’t made in London but we made it a London record, for sure. It’s when that piano kicks in… sheer joy!

Veryverywrongindeed’s Tim Sheridan gets personal with a tune that soundtracked his move to London from his hometown, Leeds, back in the 80s…

The Raid – Jump Up In The Air

Tim: I chose The Raid’s Jump Up In The Air because it is spread all through my personal history from when it came out to even right now. It was the soundtrack of my moving to London from the north in the mid ’80s. I used to hear it in so many varied places; from Clink Street to the Orbital raves to the legit clubs. I was the first and last DJ to play at the UK’s attempt at the Love Parade and I played this as the first and last record and to see 300,000 people going mental to it was a rush and a sort of House justice too. It deserves it. It has all the elements of being a chant and a call to arms, as well as an invitation to party. It would do it a great disrespect to try to describe it further than saying that to this day if I hear it I get chills and will pogo like a nob the minute it comes on. For me it’s the definitive house record. Todd Terry innit! 

Joe Hart of Body Hammer and World Unknown just about remembers this Planet E stormer from various nights out… 

Common Factor – Positive Visual

Joe: I remember first hearing this at LOST, or some Wiggle thing, or maybe it was at The End? To be honest, I don’t really remember. What I can remember is it being one of those records that cut through everything and it being the one experience you take away from 6 hours in the dark listening to the ‘doof-doof’. I never found out what it was until many years later, I bought it and forgot I had it ‘til just now…

Now we come to the Thunder DJs – first off, the authoritative Miles Simpson takes the brief literally and recalls a London-made tune that slipped through the cracks the first time round…  

Melancholy Man –Joy

Miles: You don’t get much more LONDON and HOUSE than Warriors Dance, the West London label set up by Tony Thorpe of Moody Boys fame. It was home to Tony’s act, No Smoke, who made Koro Koro, possibly the greatest British records of all time, and also to Kid Batchelor’s legendary Bang the Party, who have claims of their own to the title I just bestowed on No Smoke!

 One record that seemed to slip through the net, though, was Melancholy Man’s Joy. Produced by Bang the Party but with what was, at the time, a rare vocal from Robert Owens, it pretty much sunk without trace. Maybe the slightly disjointed drums didn’t quite cut it in the four/four driven world of the 1989 rave scene, but the production is still beautiful and Robert really, really turns it out.

 This was once pretty hard to find and to do so required much scrabbling around in the basement of Record and Tape, but internet means it’s now a 50p virtual-bargain-bin record these days… but you know, sometimes they’re the best ones.

Then the sublime Joseph Apted goes a little bit tech-house. But not a lot…

Presence – Gettin’ Lifted

I guess this record might get lumped in with the much-maligned ‘tech house’ scene, but like most scenes if you dig about in the dross there always a few gems to be discovered and this is one of them. Presence is one of Charles Webster’s many aliases, and to be fair I could probably pick quite a few of his mid-’90s records as lost London classics i.e his remix of Hot Lizard’s The Theme, or his collaboration with Matthew Herbert as DJ Boom, but I went for this one as it’s perhaps less well- known. It’s a subtle record, couldn’t be less of a ‘banger’, but for me has a druggy, dreamy, ethereal quality to it that lifts it above a lot of other records from that period. It’s absolutely a record to get lost to at 5am in the morning in a sweaty, smoky basement and reminds me of going to nights at the End, or Brixton parties like Kerfuffle when I first moved to London. I looked it up on Discogs yesterday for the first time ever, just to remind myself what year it came outin, and was genuinely amazed to see some chancers trying to sell copies of it for over 100 quid! Although I think that says more about the amount of piss-takers there is on Discogs these days than anything else! Collectable or not, it’s a great record that you should hunt down, and listening to it again has made me want to stick it in my bag for the next Thunder!

And finally the (musically) ruthless Rick Hopkins looks back to look forward with a little slice of house music gold…

Tone Theory – ‘Limbo Of Vanished Possibilities’ (Derrick Carter & The Innocent Original Mix)

This little ditty dates from 1995, I was in my mid 20’s and frequenting clubs like Sabresonic II, Drum Club, Club UK, Strutt & Full Circle and this record was a mainstay at all of them. A fantastic production from one Derrick Carter on Mr C’s infamous Plink Plonk Records, a record that is as relevant today as it was back then and deserves to be out in the open once again, lovely piano hook, keys, whirling synth pads, some deep vocals from (I think) Derrick and the break from Gaz – Sing Sing all put to wondrous effect.

So, what does all this digging tell us? Well, it proves that house is a feeling that lingers through the years, as our DJs have proven with their fond recollections. Hopefully they made you think about your own long-lost house favourites from your own salad days in clubland… feel free to post them below, along with a memory or two of why they moved you in the first place?

To get things started, here’s the tune that started it all for this writer. Not a massive Orbital fan in general – and calling this one ‘house’ is probably pushing it – but hearing the mad proggy bassline on this, via a Darren Emerson mixtape for Muzik magazine (RIP) in 1996, was enough to to kick-start a love-affair with club culture that’s lasted nearly 20 years. If my ‘research’ ever ends, I’ll call you with the results…

Orbital – Walk Now

Win A Classic Goody Bag!

Next weekend sees one of our favourite record labels, Classic Music Company, return to Superstore for another amazing team-up! Classic boss Luke Solomon is joined in the laser basement by Chris Duckenfield and Dan Beaumont, whilst upstairs it’s a Macho City takeover with Severino, Dave Kendrick and Charlie Porter all taking to the decks.

Ahead of the party, the lovely people at Classic have sent us one of the amazing and super limited edition hand-printed Dalston Superstore X Classic tote bags FILLED WITH CLASSIC TREATS to give away to a lucky winner!

You too can look as good as Honey Dijon and Classic co-boss Derrick Carter showing off your Classic tote around town…

Honey Dijon and Derrick Carter

All you have to do to be with a chance to win is email the correct answer to hello@dalstonsuperstore.com by 10am Tuesday 23rd April with the subject “I NEED A DALSTON SUPERSTORE X CLASSIC BAG!”

Only the winner will be contacted.

Who runs Classic Music Company with Luke Solomon. Is it…

a. Beyoncé Knowles-Carter

b. Aaron Carter

c. Derrick Carter

Join Luke, Chris, Severino and more at Dalston Superstore on Saturday 27th April for Classic X Superstore #2 from 9pm – 3am. 

Image courtesy of Honey Dijon’s Instagram.

Luke Solomon

Luke Solomon is one of the true heroes of house music. From the legendary midweeker Space that he ran through the ’90s with the late (and much missed) Kenny Hawkes, to the hugely influential Classic Music Company he started with Chicago’s Derrick Carter, Luke has always championed the underground, the leftfield and anything that makes you move. Now that Classic are bringing the party to Superstore, Luke kindly answered some of Dan Beaumont’s questions…

You have been prolific in the studio lately… What drives your creativity?

Mostly sadness, pain and sorrow, oh and anger and frustration… I find it quite hard to be creative when I am happy. I usually use the happy periods to finish the music I made when I was unhappy. Well you did ask…..

The Digital Kid… An analogue experiment… Whose side are you on in the format wars? 

I am generally at war with myself in the format wars. My mind constantly contradicts itself. I buy digital music continuously. I also buy physical music continuously. What I have begun to realise is that they are almost like two completely different worlds running in tangent to each other.

It’s kind of interesting because at Classic we do one thing, i.e. we release vinyl, run vinyl exclusives, and then do digital.

But at Defected, we will release digital, then if the record does well, we will release vinyl post release….

So I like both… I just hate the downside of the internet… i.e. piracy and idiotic people.

And I dislike the fact that it’s so hard to sell vinyl and break even on it….

But the world needs a balance of both.

Why does HOUSE need Classic now more than ever?

I think house needs a a community again, especially in the UK. I think that the whole scene became fragmented by egos and people just looking out for themselves. I guess money and a rubbish economy naturally does that to people. Both Derrick and myself feel that that selflessness needs to be injected back in order to grow a world of great music within our scene that is not just centred around a DJ using a label as a vehicle in order to rule the world and be the next biggest thing ever.

What do you argue with Derrick Carter about?

We don’t really argue. Especially not about music. We have had our moments, but those are generally because we are both being big old grumps. Nothing more.

What are you looking forward to in 2013?

Paint testing parties. And the rise of the welly sock. 

What record do you wish you had signed?

Knights Of The Hunted – X The Beat.  But it got lost on my hard drive after Parrot sent it to me and Toddla and Raf picked it up. We got to release the vinyl though as compensation.

What tune has spent the longest time in your record box?

I always take something by Spencer Kincey. He’s my musical good luck charm.

Join Luke Solomon, Dan Beaumont, Rob Mello and Severino for Classic X Superstore on Saturday 26th January from 9pm – 3am.