Posts Tagged ‘East Bloc’

Clam Jam Big Bitch Single Release

The two mega-babes behind Clam Jam have certainly been busy this year, and we’re only just over half way through! In between booking festival slots at Lovebox and Secret Garden Party and club nights at XOYO and East Bloc, they’ve gone all ‘Yonce on us and sprung us with a surprise single release! We sat down to chat party plans, inspiration and …uh… Victoria Sponge!


Bica and Cathal, your Clam Jam babe-duo is such a big part of the success of your parties. How did you two come together?
 

B: I bought a box of cereal one day, which is strange in itself considering I am a full English breakfast kinda gal, and lo and behold he was the free gift in it. I kinda liked him so thought I would keep him.

C: Whilst trawling the internet I stumbled upon Serbianmidgetlover.com, placed a bid and won her for 2p and a ten pack of Richmond Menthol Super 10s. She seemed happy enough and I haven’t had the heart to get rid of her since then. They run a strict no exchange or return policy so we’ve been stuck together for years now.

We knew you could throw an amazing party, but had no idea you had a bloody single up your sleeves! How did this all come about?

C: Ah yes! Well… we had this tune in mind for a while, then our mate producer Alex Blanco, who had been  coming to cLAM jAM a while and loving what we played, suggested we all get in the studio……

B: …. and the rest is history.

Where did you draw inspiration for your video?

B: Cathal has been doing amazing video work forever now, for various personal and professional projects, bands, festivals and fashion designers. I love Victoria sponge…. And he loves to make me look demented!

C: There is no one simple answer for this, being that a ‘big bitch’ isn’t a comment about size I suppose.
Its about being fully saturated, excessive and comfortable in your tastes, sexual habits, body, sense of humour or unapologetic lack of it even. One man’s big bitch is another man’s cream cake.  

2015 is looking set to be a big year for Clam Jam! Can you tell us a bit about your party plans for the next few month?

C: We are keeping our Thursday nights, OBVS, at the Mothership Superstore which just gets better and more lushed-out by the minute. We are playing at this year’s Lovebox for the Little Gay Brother Vegas Room on the Friday 17 July, which we are  excited about. Then the weekend after we are set to get all at one with nature, ahem, and play at the Secret Garden Party Festival ! 

B: Also, this is super secret still but we’ll let ya onto something… cLAM jAM will be doing something bigger and better in an unusual location in August. Can’t say more than that, but watch his space.

You have an extra-special guest planned for the debut of your single. Can you tell us a bit about her ?

B: Yep! Super excited that we got a DJ set for the single launch courtesy of the fabulous Perera Elsewhere from the band Yahcoozi.

C: We’ve been following her for a while now, since she has done bits with our mate Hannah Holland, who in turn hooked us up, and we really wanted her to do the set for this night especially. 
Check her out – it’s gonna be ace! 

 

Join Bica, Cathal and Perera Elsewhere this Thursday 16 July for the Clam Jam Big Bitch single release party from 9pm-2:30am.

Meet Wayne Shires

By Dan Beaumont

Wayne Shires has been at the forefront of London’s underground queer culture for several decades. From the best acid house warehouse parties in ’89 through to legendary dance floors like Substation, Bar Industria, Crash, Area, The Cock and his current baby East Bloc. He’s also been busy preparing for this weekend’s massive Summer Rites festival. Superstore’s Dan Beaumont caught up with him for a cuppa.

 

Can you please explain the compulsion to throw parties and open venues?

I think it must be some form of masochism. It can be really tortuous but at the same time it can be very euphoric and satisfying and rewarding when you get to that point where you see people enjoying themselves, and you’re the one who’s created it. It’s not a vanity project. I just really enjoy people having a good time. I’ve always liked putting on a party.

You started putting on parties during the acid house era?

The very first party I put on was a Sunday night at what used to be called The Apollo, which was a rent boy bar in Soho, which turned into The Brain run by Sean McLusky [legendary London music promoter- Dan] and later become Trash Palace on Wardour street. I’ve been going to clubs since I was about sixteen – I  met Princess Julia around then. I used to go to Heaven, Subway. Lasers on Green Lanes, Bolts.

I started going out in clubbing London and then I moved to America and had a had a stint there hitting the clubs. When I got back, there were warehouse parties and people were taking ecstasy, but there wasn’t really the music.

We used to go to Ibiza every summer. One year we went to Amnesia, I remember turning round and thinking “who are these people in shorts and smiley T-shirts, and what’s this music they’re dancing to? And they’re all off their heads!”

Wayne in Ibiza

That’s when I met Terry Farley and Danny & Jenni Rampling. Jenni said, “We love you guys, you have to come to our club Shoom when you get back to London.”      

I remember the first time I went to Shoom I wore jeans and a shirt. 

Next week in dungarees and smiley T-shirt?

Dungarees, smiley T-shirst and little round glasses. I dived straight into it – this was ’88.

And the Boys Own parties, East Grinsted – the famous one – the one down on the lake. That party was like the Sex Pistols gig at the 100 club. Everyone says they were there but they weren’t! I was there. I can tell you who was there. We were going to all that and I was then going back into ‘gay world’ and thinking “gays would love this.”

We used to go to a club called Queens on a Sunday afternoon run by Phil Perry and we were like the little gang of gays, about five of us – the token gays – but they adored us. Suddenly I was hanging out with football terrace boys, Chelsea fans, and they were all pilled up and loved up and very accepting. I just thought it would be really good to put on a party where that lot met my lot and we just kind of merged it.

The first party (getting back to your original question!) was a Sunday night at the Apollo. We wanted somewhere on a Sunday and the Apollo really unusually had a 5 o’clock license on a Sunday. This was ‘89. So we did a party there called ‘Eclipse’ that both Phil Perry and Danny Rampling played at plus a budding DJ who used to badger me all the time called Ashley Beedle. I gave him his first gig! 

And then you went on to do warehouse parties?

There was an arts space called The Diorama which is at the back of Regents Park Crescent and it’s a really beautiful hexagonal art space. There would be art happenings there and exhibitions. We hired it. It had ridiculous restrictions like you weren’t allowed to sell alcohol so you had to include it in the ticket price. It only went on til 2AM. When we did the first one there was this old guy who used to be the caretaker and actually lived upstairs in this room with an Alsatian dog.  We were getting the stock in on the first one and he said “oh Red Stripe – my favourite drink” and we went “do you want a case” So we gave him a case.

Later on it got to 2AM and he was by the bar loving it and he said “Just go on.”

So we carried on til six in the morning. We got away with doing those monthly for about two years.

Were they gay parties?

They were mixed. We had Kinky Gerlinky drag queens with Terry Farley, and we merged the whole thing. That’s when we started integrating people like Princess Julia and all those DJs in with the West London house DJs. You’d have drag queens dancing next to Chelsea boys.

Wayne Shires with Leigh Bowery

Was your first foray into venue owning Substation?

I had one before that called Bar Industria which was off Regent Street. Fat Tony did a night called ‘Abba’ on a Tuesday. Linda Evangalista DJing, stuff like that. I went up to her and said “Can I get you a drink?”

She said “Yeah bottle of tequila.”

Are we in the ‘90s now?

Yeah ‘91.

So this is supermodels and glam house?

Basically. George Michael used to come. It was fun. That only lasted a year and then we did Substation. Everything I’ve ever done has been inspired by a two year period when I lived in America. Every reference I have ever used is from that. So Bar Industria was Boy Bar, so it was very light, trophies on the wall, table football, checkerboard vinyl flooring, kind of a boys club. Very municipal, like a working men’s club. So there was that and then we went on to do Substation, which was Stallions before, and then became Ghetto after. We were there for five years. That was kind of Anvil/Mineshaft New York. Oil drums, chain link fencing, gay porn vodeo shoot style.

I remember pop videos being shot there?

Yeah quite a few. 

I was hanging out in New York a lot at the time,  hanging out with Rob di Stefano from Tribal Records  and met Danny Tenaglia through him. I did a party for them down at what become the original XXL venue. Danny used to play Substation when he was in town. It was quite a special time, really.  

Then we did Substation South in Brixton, which was a sort of South London version of the Soho one and you’d get away with a lot more there! That was Queer Nation’s home for many years. And it suited it and was perfect.

And then you invented Vauxhall?

I don’t know if I want to be credited for that right now! Substation moved to a bigger space on Dean Street – high ceilings, 600 capacity, we had it for about two years. When we were in the original venue you could open Monday Tuesday, Wednesday with like a hundred people in and it would look great. But the Dean Street venue needed like four hundred people in it and we couldn’t do that Monday to Thursday. We survived there for about two years. We had a lot of shit from the police. They would turn up and there would be a sea of boys with their shirts off and they would say “Your license says people need to be properly attired, tell them to put their shirts back on.”

I would stand at the door arguing with the police saying “You go and tell ’em to put their shirts back on!”

I got taken to court! Basically one Friday night we got a visit from the club squad. About five of them turned up in trench coats– it was all very bizarre. And they came in and said, “Can we just walk around?”

So we walked through the back way and literally as we turned into the dance floor this guy dropped to his knees and started sucking this other guy off!

I just whacked him round the back of the head and said “Security! Throw them out! And if they have memberships, take it off them!”

We all carried on walking and when we reached reception the police turned around and said “Mr Shires you are not obliged to say anything…”

I was done for running a disorderly house and ended up at the magistrate’s court. My business partner at the time had grief from the police for years. He wasn’t having any of it so he got the best barristers and we got it thrown out.

Substation South was running and Lambeth police had a lot more to deal with and were quite happy that there was a safe place the gays were going and had a different attitude. So I loved Lambeth and I suddenly started working really proactively with Lambeth police and the council.

When a railway arch came up in Vauxhall I opened Crash. Which was my version of Tunnel. So that’s the next New York reference.

And that was the first club in Vauxhall?

Yeah you had the Royal Vauxhall Tavern and the Market Tavern, which was a pub in the Nine Elms tower which was great. That was really cool, but it wasn’t a club per se. It was a pub for the traders of Covent Garden Market so it had one of those weird licenses. At one point they used to have an after hours there but you had to buy a bunch of flowers to go in!

Hang on. You were worried about being able to fill Substation in Dean Street so why did you take a massive railway arch in Vauxhall?

Substation South was doing incredibly well and that only held 350/400, it was rammed. Also I knew South London would be a lot more accommodating and Vauxhall was literally on the border – the closest you could get to the West End and the West End was the place to be. Heaven was there, all the gay bars were there. There was nothing East really. I wanted that big superclub! I wanted it to be really underground, I wanted the music to be cutting edge. We were very much into Tribal and Twisted. I was living with Tom Stephan and he was the main DJ from Substsion so it was a platform for his sound. It was all Murk, Tenaglia, it was that whole sound.

Give me one legendary night at Crash. What sticks out in your memory?

Yoko Ono performing.

Wow.

Yeah. I mean getting a phonecall in the office going “Yoko wants to perform in your club but you can’t announce it.”

“Ok.”

It was quite special.

How do you feel about Vauxhall now?

It’s a shame. At one point when I had Crash and we had been open a few years, The Eagle (Horse Meat Disco’s home) had been taken over by Mark Oakley and Paul Wilde. And there was the RVT. So there was a bit of a gay village thing going on. We had meetings with the council to go up to Manchester to see the model of Canal Street. Lambeth were very interested in developing Vauxhall gay village with road signs, we were going to change the name of roads to names with gay references and there was this blossoming idea that we were going to turn it into the gay village. Then other people came into the area with a different game plan. Money driven. The atmosphere changed and it all broke up. At one point it was very ‘us and them’ with a club that opened up. They weren’t particularly nice; they were very spiteful, used dirty tactics and it fell apart. It lost its solidarity. Then I opened Area because I’m a sucker for punishment and I wanted a bigger club.   

So you opened a giant club next door to your other giant club?

When that arch came up next door to my giant arch I thought it’s better for me to open up that giant arch than anyone else. I developed the model – everyone loved Crash and then all the arches were up for grabs. 

So I opened the big club next to the big club, which was a struggle, but programme-wise it kind of worked for a couple of years, but always battling with the people I won’t mention. I made one or two bad business decisions and got involved with the enemy, and the enemy screwed me over. I thought, “I’m out of here.”

It’s a different place now

It is. 

What made you get back on the saddle and start East Bloc?

I’d been a bit battered. I had enjoyed my career and what I had done. A lot of my mates had come East so I moved East. Julia and people were already living here and I bumped into Sean McLusky and he said “There’s a little club on City Road you should check out…”

I went and did a party there and it was just as I was selling Crash. The landlords said, “Do you want to buy it?”

I said, “No, I don’t want to buy a club.”

They said, “Why don’t you take a lease?”

I said, “Alright, I’ll have a go.”

Because I’m a masochist like we said at the beginning

Compared to the stress levels I’ve had in the past East Bloc is a walk in the park. It’s a lovely space to run, the crowd that come are lovely, the promoters are lovely, it’s a pleasure. 

Why do you think clubs like East Bloc are important?

LGBT venues are important because there are so few and it’s really important for people to be themselves. That’s why Dalston Superstore is important. That’s why the Joiners is important. That’s why the George and Dragon is Important. That’s why The Eagle is important. There are thousands of venues in London but what venues can a boy walk in with a beard, covered in glitter, wearing a jockstrap dance on the bar in heels? It’s important we are a safe playground. What I remember growing up is that I loved going out and feeling part of a family. And I think it’s really important to help the legacy of what has come before, to go forward. People in East Bloc, the kids, they will become venue owners when me and you are way long on the tooth to be doing it. I think it’s important to show what is possible. It’s achievable isn’t it?  A lot of people go “Oh my god how do you do this?”

I always thought that owning a venue was something other people did. Then something clicked and I realised it’s achievable. What do you think of the gay scene in London now?

It’s very fractured. You have the Vauxhall ‘good’ people, the bears. Soho is Soho. If a tourist came to London and said “Show me gay London!” and they wanted an overview of the scene I would struggle to find that big club that there used to be – like Heaven used to be. Or Crash was. 

What for you is the ultimate London queer club?

(long pause)

Horse Meat Disco. Has to be. Totally.

Your relationship with Jim Stanton goes back to when you were running The Cock together?

Jim was my assistant! Eve we used to call her – Eve Harrington!

How did The Cock come about?

I was doing Crash, Jim was working in the office and I knew Simon Hobart from Popstarz who had just opened The Ghetto in my old space (The first Substation). Simon had a lesbian night on a Friday that wasn’t working and it kind of reminded me of the East Village. It was a bit alternative. Me and Jim went in there and we were sort of saying “There should be gogo boys in pants like The Cock in New York,”

We were trying to come up with the name and I think it was Jim who said, “Just call it The Cock.”

And I was like “OK.”

We had never worked together creatively on a project before and it just clicked.

Where did the musical identity come from?

That was more Jim. He’s got an incredible music taste. As have I! We’ve both got a very eclectic taste. Jim was very forward in that electro sound. I booked Tasty and Julia, Jim booked the Scissor Sisters. I remember fighting with the Ghetto about the name ‘The Cock.’ There were a lot of gay girls behind the bar and there was a protest before we started. Me and Jim were called in by Simon who told us we had to change the name. They thought we wanted to do a Men Only sex club. 

Was Summer Rites, in its original incarnation, a reaction against Pride?

We got involved with Pride in ’92 when it was Europride. Pride was really exciting then and each year the attendance went up and the sponsorship got bigger and the events got bigger and the budget got bigger. It was free to get in and political and it was great. Very quickly over a five-year period it grew and it became a national thing – you’d have coaches coming from here, there and everywhere. One year we had to turn half of Clapham Common into a coach park. Londoners being Londoners had that kind of slightly snobbish thing going on. So Summer Rites was meant to be a Pride for London. And it was always meant to be representing all the different elements of the London club scene. We were taking all the politics away and we were just having a party for Londoners. A more niche, condensed party without the coaches and all that.

What made you resurrect it three years ago?

Because I’m mental and because I’m a masochist like I said at the beginning! The last one in the ‘90s we were hit by really bad weather. It had been baking all week and it was boiling hot and literally the morning of the day there was a torrential downpour. It has been so dry and it was on a hill so there were rivers coming down. I think we did eight or nine years in the end.

About four years ago I moved to Redchurch Street, Sean McLusky had his offices there and he said “I’m doing this festival called 1234 and you’ve got to come!”

I went with Julia and we had a great time. He spotted me and said “You should do the Sunday! You should bring back Summer Rites!”

I said, “No. I’m alright thank you.”

But because I live on that street and because he saw me going past his office he would come out and badger me.

You got doorstepped into starting a festival!

I got doorstepped by Sean McLusky into starting Summer Rites. It came back. Three years in Shoreditch Park which have been fun, but parks are too stressful because it can just piss down with rain and you’re screwed. Literally it’s the flip of a coin. You put all that effort and then and you’re sat there looking at the weather report. It’s life-changing if it rains.

If I want to buy you a drink this Saturday where can I find you?

You’ll probably find me in the cabaret room. But the whole venue is amazing. I got introduced to the Tobacco Dock at Winter Pride this year. And it’s undercover but feels outside so it’s amazing. It’s half indoors half outdoors. There’s a lot of daylight, there’s a lot of natural light and some big outdoor spaces. It’s beautiful.  And it doesn’t matter of it’s pissing down with rain! 

Join Wayne at Summer Rites at the Tobacco Dock this Saturday from noon, followed by Bender here at Dalston Superstore as one of the afterparties with special guest Den Haan from 9pm- 4am.

Rocky Vs Terry Farley

This Saturday two legends of house join us in the laser basement for a special Christmas edition of Body Talk in the shape of not only acid house hero Terry Farley but X-Press 2 legend Rocky! Ahead of the party, Rocky sent us this ace warm-up mix plus him and Terry sat down for a chat…

Terry interviews Rocky…

Terry: You worked for the Ministry Of Defence – ever thought of doing a WikiLeaks turnout?

Rocky: To be honest it was so long ago the kind of hardware we were knocking out would be like Dads Army stuff today. 

 …did you get to test cool James Bond style weaponry?

Sadly no. I was a progress chaser and looked after projects that made bits for armaments. 

What was your first DJ gig?

First ever would have been the Sixth Form end of term disco at my school. Our head took us to this deserted store room where they had one of those Citronic double deck suitcase things. It was covered in dust. We dragged it out and set it up. I was hooked. Band Aid was big that year.

Can you remember any records you played?

Deffo Band Aid got played. Also some of the Breakdance movie soundtrack. Aside from those, I have no idea. I think everyone brought in their own tunes. There were a couple of us who just went through the tracks and played them. We were a glorified jukebox.

Which DJ inspired you to take up this life?

In all seriousness, out of everyone, I think you and Andrew back in the day.

What’s been your ‘worst gig ever ‘ and why?

I think recently playing to a restaurant of around 20 diners was pretty poor.

And your best gig ever?

Any time that we’ve ever been to Japan has been amazing. This year, the opening of Pacha was quite special as well.

Is HOUSE a feeling or is it just Diesel’s real name ?

It’s just his name.

Rocky interviews Terry Farley

You’re playing Handsome at East Bloc early next year, a perfect fit – why did they wait so long to ask you?    

A question my Mrs has asked along with “Why have they booked you then?” and “You wont be in the club’s pictures”. I can only say it’s a honour to be playing East Bloc again and such a cool party. I will be visiting a spa before hand and sprucing myself up for the night.

Your fave party/club/one off of 2013? One only please. And what made it so special. 

I loved Farr, playing a three- the hard way- clash with Dan Beaumont and Ms Hannah Holland – I love Farr it’s exactly how I would do a ‘festival’, if I had the know-how and the spare bucks to pull it off.

What was your first DJ gig?

Myself and a mate Paul Mckee put on a night in 1981 and we both DJed (there’s a pic of me on that night that just turned  up all these years later on Facebook) – I played a Le Beat Route style set of ’70s funk and disco, some new electro and some leftfield stuff like Prince Charles and the City Beat Band’s seminal track In The Streets. 

Can you remember any records you played?

Prince Charles – In The Streets, Fatback Band – Wicky Wacky,  Roy Ayers – Running Away and Aurra – When I Come Home on Salsoul – I always played those tracks whenever I got to play in clubs or parties after that for ages. 

If you were ‘invited to the ball’, would you have done a Boys Own pod on the Eye?

Was there money involved ? If “yes” and if “a proper drink”, then maybe, (I know Andrew would have laughed down the phone at me if I had rung him up) as it’s what I do for a living. For free? Fuck that, I thought it was a naff idea (I fully appreciated Red Bull’s contribution to house music over the years) and I’ve been on the Eye twice and never liked it much anyway.

Who was the best dresser of the Slough Soul Boys?

Gary Haisman – who went on to be banned from Radio 1 for his ACCCIIIEDD record with D Mob in 1988. He was skinny and lanky and could pull off red peg trousers from SEX and mohair jumpers while I think sadly I always looked a bit like a young Del Boy.

Define HOUSE in 12 words. 

LIFE LIFE LIFE LIFE LIFE LIFE LIFE LIFE LIFE LIFE LIFE.

Will you ever go back on the gas? 

I have dreams (nightmares) of being back pipe fitting, and in those dreams I’m always so slow and fucking rubbish at it. So NO thats never gonna happen, and for safety’s sake thank god.

Are you still a gay black man struggling to escape a white gas fitter’s body?

People still quote that line – in fact loads have stolen it… it was honestly how I felt during the early ’90s and being so into the NY gay culture that surrounded the music we were making, the DJs who were playing it and the Sound Factory, a place I adored. My bluff, however, was called one morning just around the corner from the Sound Factory and I failed the ‘ lad fag’ ( Luke Howard’s term for us lot back then) test badly… bottled it haha.

Join Rocky and Terry Farley this Saturday 21st December for Body Talk at Dalston Superstore from 9pm – 3am. 

World Aids Day

This weekend sees World Aids Day roll around once more and a wonderful reason to empty your wallet for local charity Positive East. With events across east London at venues such as The George & Dragon, East Bloc, The Joiners and right here at Dalston Superstore, there’s plenty of opportunities to be generous.

Kris Di Angelis takes over both floors of Superstore on Saturday 1st December for Super Tramp, an extra-special World Aids Day edition of his party, featuring himself and Jaime Ritchie back to back in the basement for a five hour set whilst upstairs the outrageously sexy Munroe Bergdorf and JonBenet Blonde will be running wild. 

Meanwhile, Dirtbox with Gibson, Princess Michael Of Cunt and The Duchess of Pork will be taking place over at East Bloc, a special X-Factor Live Show with Princess Julia at The George & Dragon and Pantastic with Paul Heron at The Joiners where Positive East can still benefit from your hard-earned cash.

If Friday nights are more your thing then former Tramp guest Jodie Harsh will be at East Bloc for Larry T’s Super Electric Party Machine.

If you’re in any doubt about where you should be this weekend, we’ll leave you with this snap of Munroe looking ridiculously sexy at the last Tramp…

Munroe Bergdorf at Tramp

Join Munroe Bergdorf, Kris Di Angelis, Jaime Ritchie, JonBenet Blonde and more at Super Tramp here at Dalston Superstore on Saturday 1st December from 9pm – 4am.

Kris Di Angelis: Dear Diary…

London’s hardest working DJ Kris Di Angelis shares a page from his diary from last weekend with us ahead of Tramp on Saturday night…

How am I supposed to write up this weekend just gone? Most of the good stuff is unprintable, surely the sign of a good one though eh? I managed to create a weekend diary of five DJ gigs over 32 hours in London via Brighton, plus my club night WAR was talking place at the Summer Rites Festival without me able to be there. This was always going to be a heavy one, so in a sense I knew the gloves were off before it began….

Man who carried Kris's bag

I started my Saturday night by playing a private party in Kettners for a doctor celebrating his 60th birthday. I wouldn’t normally write about a private party except for the fact that this was quite possibly the campest entrance of any 60 year old professional I’ve ever seen. Carried in on a stretcher by half the cast of Priscilla, when his head popped out to lip-sync it was clear ‘He’ was more of a ‘She’ tonight. Turns out the next 15 minutes were choreographed, rehearsed and performed to a Gloria Estefan dance megamix from the very early ‘90s (how now!), even with a bit of classic ‘Quick-Change’ action thrown in. Speechless I was!

On the midnight train to Brighton I got my head together, popped open a bottle of bubbles, mixed it with Red Bull, and got told to “For God’s sake, relax!”. I always get a bit edgy when I play somewhere new. I get unavoidably pensive. Which wasn’t massively helped by the state of post-Pride Brighton. As far as I could see Brighton had lost its shoes, was covered in bruises/sick, and I was in the hands of stewards completely unable to speak English, never mind direct me to the club I was playing in. I asked a landlord in a pub for directions to the Honey Club and got told by a disgruntled bar fly that “I know where the station is… where you can fuck off on a train back to where you came from cunt”. He looked like someone who sort of used to be good looking, so I just kind of smiled, said “Good luck with that” and paid for his pint. Having first discovered there are both Oceana and Hed Kandi clubs in Brighton too (very Brighton Uncovered, as in, I actually saw a girl lick the pavement) I eventually located Wildfruit. And look, it has half of London there! Greeted at the door by Jonny Woo and Chrissy Darling, and hanging inside with Sam DMS, Munroe Bergdorf and Johnny M made it all feel instantly familiar. Wildfruit appears to be the big after party for Pride there so it’s heaving and sweaty (I love this) and everything you’d expect from a big gay super club. VERY different from playing in East London, but that’s the point. I managed to play much cooler records there than I thought I’d get away with too, always a pleasant surprise!

Munroe Bergdorf in Brighton

The next day I decided at the last minute that it might be better to get to London on time for Summer Rites, so I skipped playing Audio and got myself back to Shoreditch as the trains were looking seriously delayed. During the journey I started receiving messages from people in the park as word was starting to spread about my WAR gogo boys. “Bitch, have you really booked dwarf gogo boys?” “There’s a disabled dwarf in the park, please tell me you didn’t….” Well I didn’t go as far as that, but I DID manage to find two handsome dwarves to serve as soldier gogo’s for the WAR slot in the East Bloc tent. THEY WERE AMAZING! I’ve never wanted to get to a park so fast as when I got sent pictures of them half naked throwing themselves around our stage! To top that off I had a whole load of my mates playing together on the stage for the entire set, including Bryony Masters, James Pople, Adam Turner, Joshyou Are and Ariel. No bad can come from a group of DJs having a hilarious time playing together, so it’s safe to say WAR delivered everything I wanted it to. I sped over to finish up the Room Service tent, caught a bit of Boy George’s set (HE SANG VIDEO GAMES!!!), got carried around on somebody’s shoulders, dealt with a million ex’s (why are festivals always like that?) and hurried home to get ready for the Room Service Vs WAR after party.

Gogo dancers at WAR 

This is when my laptop died.

As you may know, I am a laptop DJ. However, having just recently received my entire CD collection out of storage, I decided now was the time to give this archaic medium a run for its money. I packed a case full of music and made my way nervously over to Bar Music Hall. Kim Ann Foxman was playing an absolutely blinding set, I really don’t know if it gets much cooler than her. She’s got excellent taste, so when some gay tapped me on the shoulder and said “Can I ask her to play some proper dance music like Rihanna?” I replied, “If you even think about it, I will kill you”. He then seemingly ignored me and was already prodding her for attention. By the time she turned round though the gravity of what I’d said sunk in, he smiled at her and said “I think you’re amazing”, winked at me and danced his way to the bar. Smoooooth! I then began to play my first ever set on CD, and was struck by how easy it is. A bloody kid could do it! It’s so dumbfoundingly easy to mix on CD’s that I really don’t know where some DJs get their arrogance from. The years I’ve spent getting grief from moronic dinosaurs about being on a laptop! If anything I just found it a bit limiting, but put it this way, I’m SO playing on CDs this Saturday at Tramp! Once the party was FINALLY over I made my way home to have a giggle with the Harsh and a few others. As is always the way when you get that many gays working together, there was a lot of hardcore gossip generated on the day that we had to process. Seemed like everyone went back to Amanda Le Pore’s hotel suite for an after party, but my bed was definitely more attractive than even the world’s No. 1 transsexual.

Jodie Harsh at Summer Rites

All in all it was great, Brighton was great, Summer Rites was great, the after party was great, and having my bag carried for some of the journey was awesome. The only question I have, is that if Severino really was playing absolutely everywhere, how the bloody hell did I miss him?!

Kris Di Angelis plays at his night Tramp this Saturday 8th September with super secret special legendary guests from 9pm – 3am here at Dalston Superstore.

Summer Rites

We’ve very pleased to be joining our friends Gutterslut, East Bloc, Vogue Fabrics and more at this year’s Summer Rites festival! Taking place in Shoreditch park on Sunday 2nd September, the main stage features the talents and delights of Jonny Woo’s Gay Bingo, Bright Light Bright Light, Feral Is Kinky, Mutya and…. BOY GEORGE! 

Rest assured that even though we’ll be nursing our hangovers from Paris’ Acid Ball here at Superstore the night before, we’ll be out in full force hosting a kick-ass, pumpin’ tent with some of our favourite DJs playing all day, including the incredible KIM ANN FOXMAN!!

Joining her will be Grizzle (John Sizzle and A Man To Pet) DJ Squeaky, Rokk, Mikki Most, Dan Beaumont, The Lovely Jonjo Hannah Holland and Severino.

Summer Rites logo

Tickets are £25 from the Summer Rites website or come into Superstore and pick up one of our discounted tickets at £15 each from behind the bar!

For more information be a fan of Summer Rites on Facebook.

The Cock

The Cock is one of those clubs that changed everything. Bravely coming to the rescue of the queer underground and helping to spawn something they called electroclash; The Cock (along with other discos like Nag Nag Nag, 21st Century Bodyrockers and Trash) shook up our perceptions of what we should be dancing to in the small hours with a heady mix of ‘80s synth noise, punk-funk out of New York City and new alien-sounding electronic music coming from Europe. Bringing a much needed rock ‘n’ roll aesthetic back to clubland, The Cock paved the way for much of what we now take for granted on East End dancefloors. For one night only she’s stepping out of cryogenic suspension down the road at XOYO so we spoke to founder Jim Stanton (now Horse Meat Disco megastar) about all things Cock!

The Cock by Kenny Campbell

What prompted you to start The Cock?

Wayne Shires*!!! I met him at Crash when I was working for Sleazenation and Jockey Slut magazines and he asked me to jump on board with Crash as it was expanding. We released compilation CDs and got lots of top guests at the club, Tenaglia, Yoko Ono, Derrick May etc etc! TOP CLUB! Our friend (now sadly departed) Simon Hobart** asked if we could fill the Friday night at the (also now gone) Ghetto club at Falconberg Court***. The rest was history – we robbed the name and all the references from our favourite New York dive bars and clubs. It was an upfront boys-y kind of raucous Friday night out. Musically we were both synth-loving kids, and I was working at Sleazenation at the time… those sorts of things were all the rage in 2002! 

* Cock co-promoter, former founder of Crash, now owner of East Bloc

** The creator of seminal queer indie club Popstarz

*** Also home to the legendary Nag Nag Nag

How did you choose your original residents?

Easy. We picked Princess Julia and Tasty Tim because it was what they had been looking for – a way out of all the bland tech house going on at the time. They were playing for Wayne at Crash as well as other gay clubs around London at the time but The Cock offered them a chance to really indulge their real passions born from the days of the eighties at clubs like Taboo and Kinky Gerlinky. 

The Cock by Kenny Campbell

What were your favourite live performances?

Too many to mention YR MUM YR DAD, Scissor Sisters, Hot Chip… So many!

The Cock by Kenny Campbell

Which London parties do you think are following in the footsteps of The Cock?

It was definitely a DIY aesthetic we had going on and it was very carefree. I think it really gave birth to TrailerTrash.

What are your craziest memories from The Cock?

I can’t remember anything at all! Bjork hiding in the coats in the cloakroom? I do remember it was very celeb-y but not in a wanky way – nobody gave a damn, it was just somewhere people went to throw down after a long week. Very special. 

JIM’S TOP 5 COCK ANTHEMS

Seeleenluft – Manilla (Ewan Pearson mix) 

Freeform Five – Perspex Sex (Ewan’s H-N-RG Mix) 

Le Tigre – Deceptacon (DFA Mix) 

 LCD Soundsystem – Losing My Edge 

Felix Da Housecat – Madame Hollywood (Tiga RMX) 

The Cock’s 10 Year Anniversary Party takes place this Saturday 21st July at XOYO with Mark Moore, Princess Julia, DJ Rokk and Jim Stanton.

Photo credit: Kenny Campbell. For more of Kenny’s work visit kctv.co.uk