Posts Tagged ‘JD Twitch’

Hot Mess

By Hot Mess

What does a Hot Mess look like? They come in all shapes and sizes, although it’s fair to say the majority are kinda scruffy with facial hair and a suspicious bulge in their pants. A more interesting question is: what does a Hot Mess feel like? At our parties we’re trying to make people feel the following…

In no particular order: elated, excited, aroused, disoriented, joyous, heartbroken, invincible, overstimulated, enchanted, aroused – did I say that already? You get the picture.

Optimo’s JD Twitch said this when he played at the club in April this year:

Apart from the fact it’s an honour to be asked to play at Hot Mess, I enjoy playing there because it is one of very few club nights in Glasgow that is doing something different and that has built a true sense of community around it. It isn’t about booking big names guests to pull people in, but through hard work and simply playing great music that Simon truly believes in, it has become one of the most important and vital club nights in Glasgow and has inspired others to follow suit.

And here are five “What Does A Hot Mess Look Like” tracks:

The Galleria – Calling Card

The Galleria is a collaboration between NYC producer Morgan Geist (the man behind Metro Area and Storm Queen) and singer Jessy Lanza. It’s cold as ice! Super-sharp electro-boogie.

Nancy Whang and Audiojack – Like An Eagle

Nancy Whang has sung with LCD Soundsystem and The Juan Maclean and she is great. This cover of a ’79 disco classic SOARS. God bless Nancy and her voice of glacial delight.

Christian S: The Power Of Now

 This is the definition of a solid banger. Arpeggios. Disco drums. Relentless. Kinda what it would have sounded like if Daft Punk had met Giorgio Moroder in 1993 rather than 2013.

Lena Willikens – Howlin Lupus

I wasn’t sure how this would go down when I played it, but it was welcomed on the dancefloor like an old friend. Dark, disorienting and deeply groovy. Last time I played it at Hot Mess it resulted in a total “taps aff” moment and much snogging.

Tom Rowlands – Through Me

Tom Rowlands is one half of the Chemical Brothers and Through Me is possibly my favourite 12” of the past five years. It’s so full of energy and demented glee! I usually accompany it with a strobe light overdose, which instantly lifts a hundred pairs of sweaty hands into the air.

Join Hot Mess on Friday 17th July for Shake Yer Dix at Dalston Superstore from 9pm – 3am.

Kevin McKay

By Sigmund K

On the 5th of July, Ubermax returns to the lazer basement with Glasgow Underground’s boss Kevin McKay, a man who has been in the industry since the ’90s and who has, amongst other many achievements, discovered Mylo, and released steadily throughout the decade on his own label. In the ’00s, Kevin spent most of his time managing the career of his artists, releasing only a few records on GU, until a couple of years ago when he decided to re-launch the label and do what is the most important for us; release amazing music. We asked him a few questions ahead of Ubermax…

Kevin, you decided a couple of years ago to re-launch Glasgow Underground (GU), which looks like a brilliant decision when we look at the quality of all the new releases. It seems that your whole career has been fed by the need of picking up new challenges, was reviving GU a new challenge or did you feel that people were getting back to the older house sound?

I think that’s part of the joy of working in music. You’re never allowed to rest on your laurels for too long: the scene changes too quickly. There is a real change-or-die mentality that runs through the music business. Obviously you see that everywhere to some extent, but in music I think it is all the more evident. Luckily I get bored quite easily so I’m always looking for new things. I signed Mylo and set up Breastfed partly as a reaction to how serious house music had become. This time round it’s a bit different. I had spent the last four or five years doing too much of the business side of running a label and wanted to get back into the creative side. Glasgow Underground had put out the odd release since 2002 but I hadn’t really done anything with it due to my commitments to Mylo and Grum. I was also really enjoying where house/dance music had ended up post minimal and electro and so when I started making tracks again, it seemed like the perfect home for them.

GU has recently launched a series of compilations, with the first edition mixed by JD Twitch from Optimo. Can you tell us a bit more about this project, and can give us some hints about the rest of the series?

I love compilations but there are so many fantastic ones that people can get for free these days from the likes of RA, Fact and Data Transmission that the idea of putting up something for sale just because it’s a great selection of music seems a little out of date. As well as this, dance music is now a truly global phenomenon. As a DJ in the ’80s and ’90s you might come across the odd record from outside of the main dance music strongholds; the UK, the US and mainland Europe, but it was rare. Nowadays there are thriving dance scenes from Melbourne to Mexico City with their own collectives of DJs and producers. I wanted to create a compilation series that reflected this and gave the listener a kind of audio rough guide to a city’s underground scene. I started with Glasgow as it’s probably the city I know best. Keith/Twitch is a brilliant DJ, has great taste in music and was using Ableton at Optimo when a lot of laptop DJs were still at school. He also stands above the cliquishness that often permeates through Glasgow’s club scene. Those reasons meant he was the best person to give an eclectic, inclusive snapshot of the homegrown Glasgow club scene in 2013. 

In terms of future editions, there are loads that I want to do but I also want to make sure that I get the right people to do them and if that means waiting for DJs/producers other commitments to finish before I get to do a certain city, so be it. Hopefully I’ll be able to announce the next volume soon.

The Glasgow scene looks like it is exploding, and exporting more and more young talents. We are big fans of that scene at Ubermax as our past guests include Ooft! and Sei A. What do you think is Glasgow’s role in the global dance scene?

I hear a lot of DJs cite nights in Glasgow as some of the best DJing experiences they’ve ever had, so I guess on one level, Glasgow provides the kind of hedonistic underground scene that delivers world-class DJ experiences. Not that I’m gloating about Glasgow, its just that in a city that doesn’t boast the riches of London or New York, where it seems to rain for 11 and a half months of the year and where the population apparently have the highest rate of heart disease in the world, there has to be one good reason to live there.

If there’s anything that I’ve learned from starting out as a DJ and producer in Glasgow it’s how important it is too keep your feet on the ground. There’s a healthy you’re-only-making-dance-music-son-it’s-not-a-cure-for-cancer style reality checkpoint awaiting anyone who starts putting on too many airs and graces. It is also a common Scottish trait not to praise people for fear that “they will get too big for their own boots” and so when you do get props, you know it’s truly well deserved. And while I don’t think a lack of praise is the best way to encourage new talent, I do think that people that come through the Glasgow scene retain a down-to-earth-ness that can be lacking in well-known producers from other places. 

Over the years you’ve been an excellent spotter of new talent. Are there some young artists that you really like at the moment? Or that will appear on GU and that we haven’t yet heard of?

Cheers! I really enjoy the A&R process. There are a few producers from Glasgow that I really like right now. Some (and hopefully all) of these will appear on Glasgow Underground in the future; Barrientos, ThoseBeats, Mermaids. Outside of Glasgow we have a single due from London/Bristol based Bxentric that Cosmic Kids, Phil Kelsey and I have remixed and there’s a new producer from London called Lumino who’s also recording for Danse Club and has an EP due on GU. As well as that, there are loads of people not on the label that I’m into. I do a monthly radio show on www.sceen.fm that archives on the Glasgow Underground Soundcloud and you’ll find loads of new music and producers on that.

Let’s talk about London now… What is you experience of London as a DJ? Can you tell us your best and worse London gig memories? 

I haven’t DJed in London for a while so I’m really looking forward to it and in terms of experiences, I’ve never had a bad one in London, I guess I’ve just been lucky. My favourite place to play in the past was a straight tie between Kenny Hawkes and Luke Solomon’s Space @ Bar Rhumba and Harri’s night at Plastic People (when it was on Oxford Street). 

What are your next challenges for the future?

Keeping working in music and having as much fun as I can doing so!

Join Kevin McKay this Friday 5th July at Dalston Superstore for Ubermax from 9pm – 3am.

How The Other Half Lives

This Saturday sees two of our favourite parties come to Superstore for an excellent team-up taking place over both floors. The basement plays host to Hot Boy Dancing Spot, where special guest Rory Phillips, fresh from a US tour that even took in a celebrated Beats In Space appearance, will join residents The Lovely Jonjo and Hello Mozart. Meanwhile, upstairs, vinyl-obsessives Drop The Needle return for another journey through the depths of their record bags.

We caught up with DTN guest Goncalo Pereira aka ZNTN from record label and mixtape series How The Other Half Lives to quiz him on all things wax ahead of the party…

Why the cassette tape limitations on the HTOHL mixtapes?

As I didn’t want people to try to use obvious dance music genres or edits I thought that referring to it as a mix-tape would help to put it in perspective. No mixing and a short amount of time will make people only get their favourites and not care if a track is easily mixable or not. Also making a reference to cassettes might bring back memories of old tapes. 

Is there much, or any, crossover with tracks that feature on them, to what you play out?

Depends on the night. It’s a great way to find new tracks and I’ve had a couple residencies that worked around the same sort of music selection and mixing style, but I’m mostly booked for more of a club type of night. I do try to mix it up a bit if it’s early enough and bring some weird gems through the night but I suppose this project is an outlet for music I don’t usually play out.
 
Which one do you find yourself coming back to more often that not?
 
I try to go over all of them every now and then and my best-of keeps on changing, I think some of them take a while to get to you. I’d suggest as a starting point the mix-tapes by Ivan Smagghe, Bennedict Bull’s four part mix-tape, Romain BNO, Scott Fraser, Justin Robertson, JD Twitch…
 
What can we look forward to on the record label for the rest of the year?
 
I just released a couple weeks ago a double 12” by The Draughtsman (Alex Egan), that includes six original tracks and remixes by Cosmo Vitelli, Tim Paris, Daniel Avery and Roman Flugel.

Currently I am working on release number four which includes a new project called Herman Brahns (Unlikely and Medlar) with remixes by Scott Fraser and DMX Krew.

Plus getting back on guest mix-tapes and more of my own original material.

What’s currently on your stereo?
 
Currently on my stereo or piled next to it are Office Of Future Plans, The Asphodells, Iron & Wine – Kiss Each Other Clean, Yo La Tengo – Fade, Macadam Mambo 003, Anthony Naples – Moscato, Rogue Edits 003.
 
What’s your favourite record store ever?
 
Embarrassed to pick favourites but I make a weekly visit to Rough Trade for my ‘rock’ collection and to Phonica for my ‘electronic’ collection. Kristina and Sounds Of The Universe are also unmissable. Back in Lisbon I’d pick Flur as a mandatory stop.
 
What was the last record you bought?
 
You can never buy just one and you can tell how divided I feel about my collection which prompted the mix-tape project.

Last week includes Crackboy – Crackwood, Doubleheart – Roots, Brassica – Temple Fortune, Jawbreaker/Jawbox split, Husker Du – Everything Falls Apart…

Why is wax still so important?
 
If you’re paying for something it has to count – I completely understand the necessity for digital for it’s portability and accessibility but digital-only releases are disposable. If you’re willing to release a vinyl record or to pay for one then there’s more effort involved and that will keep the quality on another level. The records you buy on vinyl will most likely be your favourites. Plus the obvious higher quality and amazing artwork! Having said that I love when albums come with voucher for digital.

 

Discogs or crate digging?

I have to say it’s usually Discogs, I do some digging but mostly trying to track down records I’ve missed or are out of print. There are also a lot of American labels that I admire which don’t seem to do particularly well in the UK so it’s impossible to find them in second-hand shops.

And what’s one track we can expect to hear from you at Drop The Needle?
 
Can I pick two? An upper and a downer?

Fader – Fortunate Alpha

Sophie – Nothing More To Say (Jackmaster Dub)

Join Goncalo in the top bar this Saturday 23rd February for Drop The Needle. Downstairs plays host to Hot Boy Dancing Spot with special guest Rory Phillips.

Farr Festival

This summer sees our favourite Thursday night acid house party Society team up with one of favourite websites The Ransom Note to host a stage at Hertfordshire’s Farr Festival. They’re in good company as they’re joined by Bristol based night Just Jack, long-running north London party Sancho Panza and Leeds night Flux.

The line-up boasts Miguel Campbell, Eats Everything, George FitzGerald, Waifs & Strays, Huxley and Jozif, whilst over on the Ransom Note Vs Society stage they’ll be bringing you the sounds of:

JD Twitch from Optimo
Hannah Holland
Terry Farley
our very own Dan Beaumont
Trevor Fung (who’ll be playing a special sunset set)
the Thunder DJs 
and more

Check out this amazing Balearic mix from Optimo to get you in the mood!

Farr Festival takes place 27th-28th July and tickets are only £35 direct from The Ransom Note. If you can’t wait that long for a spot of acid house, pop down to see Trevor Fung play Society’s monthly party with Robert Owens in the Superstore lazer basement on Thursday 26th April 9pm – 3am.

For more info on Farr Festival and the full line-up visit their official website: farrfestival.co.uk