Posts Tagged ‘Luke Solomon’

Bottom Heavy

On Saturday, the Laurel and Hardy of Dalston and legendary DJ’s, Dan Beaumont & Wes Baggaley,  are joining forces to get you all bumping and thumping to some deep homosexual house with their brand new night: Bottom Heavy! Having both been prominent figures in London’s queer nightlife for over a decade and played some of the most infamous parties around the globe including The NYC Downlow, we are pretty sure that these two bottoms know how to throw a TOP party.

Despite their quite sickening resumés and having been pals for years, its actually the first time they’ve collaborated together! Don’t worry huns, this isn’t the only venture for the duo. Later in the year, Dan and Wes will be playing back-to-back at Farr festival alongside Prosumer, Tama Sumo and Lakuti! 

To get you lubed up and prepared for Bottom Heavy, Dan and Wes had a little chinwag amongst themselves! Read on to find out what these two legends think about the state of London’s LGBTQ+ Nightlife, their most played records and whats on the horizon for them both!

 Dan: Can you remember the point in your life that house music grabbed you?

Wes: I do actually. I was still at school and too young to go clubbing but I remember when Steve Silk Hurley’ ‘Jack Your Body’ and Raze ‘Break For Love’ were in the UK charts and on Top of the Pops. I remember the video for ‘Jack Your Body’ having a bucking bronco in it. Then there was the whole acid house /rave thing in the tabloids. I became mesmerised by it. I used to buy 7-inch singles every week with my pocket money from being really young and I remember buying ‘Jack Your Body’, ‘Love Can’t Turn Around’ and Inner City ‘Good Life’ on 7inch. The first house music 12 inch I bought was Lil Louis ‘French Kiss’ in 1989/90 which I still have and still play.

Dan: I remember all those weird cartoon videos they threw together for those Chicago house records that became hits. Also remember thinking ‘who is Steve Silk Hurley and why isn’t he in his video?’ Then I got totally obsessed with Betty Boo.  

Wes: What inspired you to open Dalston Superstore? 

Dan: I met Matt and other Dan (DSS co-owners) when they were running Trailer Trash, and I was doing a party called Disco Bloodbath. As promoters, we often had problems with venues, and talked a lot about starting our own. Eventually we began looking in earnest and around 2008 we found the site that became Superstore. It had been empty for a couple of years before we found it. We just wanted to create a space where the people who came to our parties would feel at home, where the music, drinks and food were all good and our friends could be themselves.

Dan: What sounds are you looking for when you go shopping for records to play out? What are you trying to communicate through DJing?

Wes: That’s a tough one. I like a really wide range of different music and play various styles but when I’m looking for sort of functional dancefloor records I tend to be drawn to quite energetic stuff with lots of percussion. I’m a massive fan of the old Cajual, Relief and Dance Mania Records and always tend to gravitate towards that type of jacking type sound. I also like disco and I’m a sucker for a disco sample but I don’t like playing the same sound all night. I just tend to play what feels right at the time, could be soulful, disco, acid, techno, hypnotic deep stuff, jazzy stuff, ravey breaks type stuff, broken beat, African percussion.

Wes: You’re partly responsible for some of the best LGBTQ+ parties around at the moment including my favourite, Chapter 10. What are your thoughts on LGBTQ+ clubbing in London at the moment, especially with a lot of venue closures in the last 5 years? 

Dan: I personally think that LGBTQ+ clubbing is very inspiring right now. Adonis, Discosodoma, Homodrop, PDA, Femmetopia, Gay Garage and loads of others are all pushing underground queer music and culture to new places. Unfortunately the gay scene is still affected by misogyny, internalised homophobia, body shaming, transphobia and masculine bullshit, but it seems like more interesting voices are starting to come through, which means more creativity and more talent steering queer clubbing. Also it’s exciting to see groups like Friends of the Joiners Arms, Resis’Dance, and London  LGBTQ+ Community Centre (all rooted in queer dancefloors) disrupting the status quo.

Chapter 10 Dan

Dan: What do you think are the positives and negatives of LGBTQ+ clubs right now?

Wes: I also think it’s a very good time for LGBTQ+ clubbing at the moment. In spite of a lot of the recent venue closures there are great nights popping up in non LGBTQ+ clubs. Seems to be a sort of creative DIY culture happening which is great. There same is happening in other cities like Manchester with great nights like Meat Free at the White Hotel and Kiss Me Again at the Soup Kitchen. There’s some great music events and brilliant cabaret stuff going on at the likes of The Glory and The RVT. As you mentioned, the internalised homophobia, transphobia and misogyny needs to be addressed. A lot of the fetish venues have closed down and some of the bigger LGBTQ+ fetish nights in London are struggling to get venues. I do think this is a vital part of the culture that is dwindling. I reckon we need a LGBTQ+ fetish rave with good music. 

Dan: Good point about all the amazing queer parties outside of London!

Wes: Can you tell me some of your favourite producers and record labels at the moment?

Dan: Labels: Lionoil, Let’s Go Swimming, Lobster Theramin, E-Beamz/Hothaus/UTTU, Not An Animal, Ransom Note, Sound Signature, Stillove4music, Dolly, The Corner, Work Them, Mistress. Producers: Telfort, Powder, Mr Tophat & Art Alfie, Jay Duncan, Midland, Jonny Rock, LB Dub Corp, Stephen Brown, Garrett David, Steffi, rRoxymore, Pariah, and everything Luke Solomon touches. Loads more that I’ve forgotten!

 

 Dan: I love it when you find a record that you know intimately from the first bar to the outro, and it does a really long stint in your bag. What are your most played records over the past couple of years?

Wes: I’ve got a few of them. I’d say my absolutely most played record is Braxton Holmes and Mark Grant –The Revival on Cajual, which has never left my bag in 20 years. I actually need to replace it because I’ve almost worn it out. Also the Maurice Fulton Syclops ones, Where’s Jason’s K, Jump Bugs and Sarah’s E With Extra P are go to tracks but luckily he’s just released another album of gems. The man’s a genius. There’s Kinshasa Anthem by Philou Lozolo on Lumberjacks in Hell that came out a couple of years ago that I’ve played a lot, and then there’s that Danny Tenaglia remix of Janet Jackson – The Pleasure Principle that I’ve owned for many years but didn’t know what it was until I heard you play it at Phonox haha

Dan: I’ve totally stolen The Revival off you. It’s pure magic.

Russia Wes

Wes: Tell us a bit about the idea behind Bottom Heavy. What can we expect?

Dan: The main idea is so we can play together all night and I can steel your tunes! Whenever I’ve heard you play, I can hear a sound in between all your records, a sort of energy that I’m always searching for myself. It’s hard to describe, but it exists in the space between that jacking Chicago sound, leftfield Detroit stuff and tribal New York tracks. Plus also jazz, afro, techno, electro and disco elements. As we mentioned earlier, here are loads of great gay nights popping off, but I think what’s missing is a really great HOUSE all-nighter that joins the dots between all those sounds. 

Wes: Haha! Well there’ll be a lot of tune stealing going on because I’ve been known to have a sneaky peek through your bag as well. 

 Dan: Back to your earlier point about Fetish nights. Why are they important to the gay scene? Are there any you remember particularly fondly? If you were to throw a fetish party, what would the vibe be?

Wes: With the fetish thing I thing it’s important to have those spaces where you can dress up and sort of act out your fantasies and do whatever you want within reason. I’m actually not massive into the sexual side of it myself believe it or not, but I do like the spectacle of the whole thing and the dressing up and the fact people are free to express themselves sexually at those nights without judgement. Sadly a lot of the fetish nights are also men only parties that go hand in hand with the whole gay misogyny thing. 

 A few years ago me and my friend Lucious Flajore put on a fetish night at The Hoist which is now closed. The night was open to everybody, gay, bi, trans, heterosexual men and women. The soundtrack was dark disco, slow brooding techno and weird electronics in one room where we also had alternative cabaret and showed art house horror movies and in the other lighter room we played disco and showed John Waters films. 

 The atmosphere was great but we had problems with the sound and there was no dancefloor to speak of then the venue closed. We also had a problem with heterosexual men complaining about gays (I know right? At the Hoist!). I am actually thinking about re-launching the party at a new venue and putting in a good sound system but making it more LGBTQ+ focused and making sure people know that women and trans people are more than welcome 

Dan: That sounds amazing. You need to make it happen!

Dan: OK last one from me. Who is your biggest DJ influence?

Wes: That’s really tough but I have to say Derrick Carter. I first heard him play in about 1995 and became obsessed. I loved the way he seemed to mix different styles with ease and mix the records for ages.

Dan: I used to go to his Classic residency at The End religiously, and would always try and describe tunes that Derrick played to people in record shops the following week. I never had any luck. I was probably trying to describe about three records being played at the same time.

Wes: And for my last one I’m going to fire that question back at you and also ask if you have any music coming out soon?

Dan: I’ve got a bunch of music nearly finished that I need to sort out. I’m going to lock myself away and do that. Arranging tracks does my nut in. 


 Catch Dan & Wes at Bottom Heavy Saturday 23rd June 9pm-3am at Dalston Superstore!

Gideön

Gideön is a man of many talents and inclinations – and a serious force to be reckoned with when it comes to throwing a party you’ll never forget! One of the creative masterminds behind arguably the best place to party at Glastonbury – Block9, he is also the owner of a record collection many of us can only dream of, and manages to find the time to manage the super-successful Downlow Radio. Between all this madness, we caught up to pick his brain ahead of this month’s Tusk


Hi Gideon! We can’t wait to have you here for Tusk. What have you been up to over the past few months?

Musically I’ve been playing out a lot… Spunking all my money on records and generally being irresponsible. I’ve be in Berlin quite a lot too. I am doing a club night out there with Yoni who runs Horse Meat Disco over there. We’ve been going out a lot, searching for venues and looking into a few sites that might work for the club.

I’ve been pouring a lot of time and energy into my weekly radio show on London’s Soho radio too. The SohoJams show has been going from strength to strength and my list of up and coming guests is pretty epic – Prosumer, Robert Owens, Bicep, Mr G, Luke Solomon etc.

My Thursday evening slot between 8-10pm is a little oasis in my crazy schedule at Block9 (The set design arts partnership I co-direct with my business partner.) The show is a time when I can do what I want, play what I want and say what I want. I cherish it, it’s sacred to me.

As the one of the masterminds behind the NYC Downlow, how have you watched it transform over the years?

Myself and Steve (my partner in Block9) created the NYC Downlow together. We have watched it grow over the past nine years into a fine thing. The set itself has evolved and become loads more elaborate. At next year’s Glastonbury we will be celebrating it’s 10th birthday and we have some MAJOR surprises up our sleeve. I take care of the music at the Downlow and it’s been amazing to watch it kinda take off. We have so many amazing DJs dying to play records with us now… It’s kind of a nightmare. We have our regular residents who are amazing DJs and then there are the super famous legends of house asking for slots too… Whats a man supposed to do?????

It seems to have been onwards and upwards for Downlow Radio ever since its inception. What’s in the pipeline for 2016?

The Downlow Radio (DLR) is about to get a complete makeover. We have been working on a super flashy new site that will play on phones, tablets and computers and will still function perfectly. The new DLR will continue to feature killer mixes – both live recordings from our venues at Glastonbury and DJ mixes from the friends and family of the NYC Downlow… Watch this space!

Can you tell us a bit about your Northern Soul night, Soulhole in Berlin?

Soulhole in Berlin is a bi-monthly night run by my partner in crime Joshua aka DJ Husband. It’s a killer little party that features homocentric soul, funk, disco and vintage gospel – kinda grown up music connoisseur tunes for the bearier boys of Berlin. It’s a really nice night. I’m just a resident there – it’s Josh’s night though!

What, to you, are some of the most exciting things happening in the London clubbing scene at the moment?

Good question… London clubbing is kinda desperate. So many venues are closing and so many of the ones that remain underachieve. I’m not really sure how to answer this question. It’s really hard to find the right tunes, the right venue and the right people all at the same time!

We have heard a lot about your incredible vinyl collection – what is the most precious record of them all?

Precious in terms of monetary value it’s gotta be Barry Whites’s first ever tune. Barry White & The Atlantics – Tracy from 1964 on Faro records.

In terms of the record that is most precious to me….there are a few. I think probably it’s gotta be one of the ultra rare gospels 7”s like I Am A Soldier by Shirley James on Gospel Express from 1978.

A favourite curveball to throw to keep people on their toes?

ZKY – Bassline tool. Great to chuck into a deep house set to noise people up a little bit!

Can you tell us in three words what you have in store for Tusk?

Deep Hard Homo

Catch Gideön alongside Terry Childs and Sean Johnston at Tusk at Dalston Superstore on Saturday 28 November from 9pm-4am.  

Alinka

One half of Chicago’s Twirl, partner-in-crime to Shaun J Wright and celebrated DJ and producer in her own right, Alinka finally joins us here at Superstore for B(e)ast! Having just quit her day job to focus on making music alongside launching Twirl Records with Shaun, she took a moment out of her busy schedule to talk to us about dancefloors and DJ booths, the importance of her hometown, and of course, the Classic Music Company and Derrick Carter…

Who are your UNSUNG house heroes and why do they warrant more appreciation?

Well I’m very much obsessed with Hard Ton and Mamacita’s music right now. I wouldn’t say they’re so much unsung heroes because they’re doing amazing things and are definitely out there in the world, but I think they deserve all the attention and more because their sound is so unique. There’s so much music coming out these days and so much of it just sounds similar or fits a formula. I think what they’re doing is really creative and special, and I really want everyone in the world to hear it and appreciate it as much as I do!

My unsung DJ hero is definitely Michael Serafini who owns Gramaphone Records in Chicago, he’s by far one of my favorite DJ’s. I’ve known Michael for about 14 years now. I used to skip school to go hang out at the record shop when I was starting out. He would help me pick out tracks, and put away little side piles for me because back then you’d have to fight for all the new stuff and you know I was young and quite little haha. He’s finally getting the attention he deserves. I know he just played Panorama bar recently for the first time and has been traveling quite a bit. He’s just a great person and an amazing DJ that deserves the spotlight.   

Let’s have some positivity instead of eliciting a DJ rant… what makes you full of love?

Shaun J. Wright makes me full of love! Since we met and teamed up, the series of events that have transpired, the people I’ve met, the music we’ve made, all the experiences collectively have been the most amazing and significant in my life. I’m very grateful for that. It’s just been really positive all around and I know that energy and love flows into the music we’re making. I’ve definitely sat down and cried listening back to songs in the studio, and we’ve had many moments where it just feels really magical.  I don’t think I ever really quite fit in or found people I completely relate to musically and in life until the past few years because of meeting Shaun. Not to say I didn’t have great friends and mentors prior, but my newfound little music family around the world has really inspired me and made me feel complete.

We previously had your sister-in-Twirl, Shaun J Wright, playing at B(e)ast here at Superstore- how do you plan to turn it out even more than he did?

Ha! Shaun is an amazing DJ and performer! I don’t think I can honestly say anyone would turn it out more than Shaun, but I’ll do my thing and give you a little piece of Chicago!

What’s had the biggest impact on your sound- the city of Chicago or Shaun J Wright? Or are they inextricably linked?

They are definitely linked! I’ve lived in Chicago since I was eight years old. It’s tattooed on me in a few places, I would say it’s in my blood at this point. I learned from watching DJ’s like Derrick Carter, Heather, and Justin Long so I think my style of DJ’ing is very much influenced by Chicago. Chicago house is what made me fall in love with dance music and basically give up any chance of a basic life (thank god). Shaun has had the most impact on me as an artist. I had taken a break from dance music for a few years because I got really burnt out and I wasn’t feeling inspired by the music that was coming out at the time. I was really down and unsure of where I wanted to go musically and in life. I really didn’t feel like I fit in with what was happening around me. Hercules and Love Affair was pretty much the only electronic music I would listen to at the time, I thought it was so epic. It got me through some difficult times and made me feel like there’s a light at the end of the tunnel. I never actually thought I would meet any of those guys, it was never a goal or anything I just really loved their music and it was monumentally important to me.

Flash forward a few years… I was in this band when my manager at the time Scott Cramer said “Hey Shaun J. Wright just moved back to Chicago you guys should do something together”.  I looked at him like he was crazy for not thinking of this earlier and keeping this info from me haha! Three years later here we are. I was so nervous to work with him because I admired him so much as an artist, it really pushed me to become a better producer. He gave me the confidence to finally make the music I always wanted to create. He really brought it out of me. He’s constantly inspiring me to grow and evolve as an artist and a human. I would say meeting him has been the most impactful thing in my career and my life generally. As you can see there’s a lot of love there haha!

Can you talk us through the evolution of Twirl?

Twirl started out as a monthly party from Shaun, myself, and our good friend Mr. White, with the help of Scott Cramer and our host Sissy Spastik at Berlin Night Club. We started it because we wanted a fun space to DJ together and wanted to showcase some of our favorite DJ’s and friends that weren’t necessarily playing in Chicago as often as they should. We just wanted to do something unique that fit our style. Berlin Night Club and Scott allowed us to really be creative and do our thing. We were fortunate to be able to bring in Eli Escobar, Lauren Flax, Heather, Derrick Carter, JD Samson, The Carry Nation, and a long list of DJ’s we really love. It recently evolved into a record label because Shaun and I were making so much music we wanted to give it a home of its own. We love working with other labels, but nothing compares to having full creative control over your own tracks and really working on every part of the release from the ground up. It’s been really amazing curating remixers and just being involved with every bit of what goes into the process. Luckily we have a great team that works very hard and supports one another. It’s gotten a pretty amazing reception thus far so hopefully we’re doing something right!

You’re taking us out in your hometown… where are we going, what are we doing? What are your Chicago musts!

Ok so I’m a huge foodie and there’s so many amazing restaurants in Chicago, but there’s one I bring every (non-vegetarian) guest to when they’re in town. It’s called Au Cheval and it’s my absolute favorite! Best burger in the universe, though really everything there is amazing. Now that we’re not hungry, we’d have to go to Gramaphone Records and pick up some classics. I hardly play vinyl out of the house these days but I’m still a collector and anyone visiting me likely is as well. It’s just a part of Chicago history you can’t avoid if you’re a music fan. After we’ve gotten that fix we’re off for drinks at Wang’s. Wang’s is my favorite bar, it’s our spot. We have a song called Wang’s On Broadway coming out on Classic Music Company next year, so obviously Wang’s has been an inspiration! It’s just epic. Our friends Banjee Report and Men’s Room have thrown some great parties there. Wang’s is a must. If you can still walk after this there’s obviously some great clubs in Chicago. Smart Bar, Primary, and Spy Bar are all doing great things on the regular so if you’d like to go for a dance then I’d head to one of those. Outside of that I spend most of my time at home in the studio so you’re more than welcome to hang out at my apartment with Shaun and I plus ‘The Ratners’. I have two cats and a dog currently, which I refer to as ‘The Ratners’ or the children. Anyway, you’re all invited! 

How did you come to be part of the amazing Classic family?

I met Derrick Carter when I was 19 through my friend DJ Dayhota who was dragging me around town to lots of amazing places I couldn’t get into on my own. Being illegal and very curious wasn’t always easy, but with the help of great friends anything is possible. Her and Derrick were good friends and I was still very fresh to the scene and learning about house music and life in general. I remember I had drinks with her and Derrick one night and then I went to Gramaphone Records a few days later and that record 10 had just come out on Classic with his picture out it. Whoever was working at the time rushed over and told me I had to get this record, and in my head I was like whatever I just had drinks with that guy no big deal, because I was actually that clueless at the time. Then I listened to it and basically bought every record on the label I could get my hands on, and he became my favorite DJ. The label has a massive section in my record collection dedicated to them and Music For Freaks. I’m a huge fan of Luke and Derrick and the artists they’ve had on the label. Classic and Cajual really changed my life.

Anyway, when we finished our first EP we sent it off to Derrick who then passed it onto Luke. We didn’t really know if they’d even listen to it but we like to aim high and luckily they picked it up! It was a dream come true for me honestly, and it was really encouraging that our first project was going to them. It meant a lot. It’s just been an amazing experience working with them, and I’m really looking forward to our second EP on the label and hopefully others to come. 

We managed to secure you a time machine and you can visit any dancefloor for any point in time! Where/when are we setting the dials for?

Oh wow my own time machine! First I’d go back and buy all the Air Jordans I can no longer afford, then we can go dancing!  To me the best decades were the ’80s and ’90s and I’d have to get to Chicago, NYC, Detroit, and definitely tour the clubs in the UK. I got to go to The Loft last year thanks to my friend Will Automagic, and that was an amazing experience! Honestly my time machine would probably be flying in circles trying to figure it out with a mild hangover like we were trying to decide on brunch. Life is hard sometimes. Thankfully we’ve had some amazing dance music come out throughout the years to make this decision nearly impossible. 

Speaking of dancefloors, who has been your most musically out there guest ever at Twirl?

This is a difficult one. They’ve all been pretty out there that’s why they’re our friends.  Musically I’d have to say Tiffany Roth of Midnight Magic. She’s really incredible and her track selection is brilliant and very versatile. 

What is your ultimate DJ booth horror story?

Ooh I have a good one! This happened recently actually. I’ve never been one to understand the ‘request’ thing but I try to be as polite as possible about it when it does happen. Like if I’m playing at your house or your brother’s birthday party then fine I could see a reason for asking me to play your favorite song which you just heard 10 times in your car on the way to the party. But luckily we’ve moved past that point in my career when you show up at the crowded club. Anyway, I was opening for Roy Davis Jr to a packed room. About half way through my set I could see this group of girls in front of the booth staring at me like they wanted to have a chat. I knew where this was going so I continued mixing and didn’t pay any attention to them. A minute later I could see long dark hair to the side of me in the DJ booth and of course I thought it was my friend because who else would force their way into a tiny DJ booth at a packed club when they don’t know the DJ. Please visualize a tiny space where there is definitely not enough room for two people to stand unless one is being pressed back into the wall.

All of the sudden the long hair started getting closer and I turned my head to notice not only is this not my friend but she’s now pushing me off to the side and leaning over the CDJ’s reaching out to her friends while laughing and trying to have a conversation with them like reality has just left the building. As I’m in shock and staring at this person with a look of confusion while also in the middle of a blend, she elbows the CDJ stops all the music and then continues her conversation as well as hovering and bumping into me and the gear at which point I have to restart the track and everyone is staring at both of us. I asked her if she knew that she was in the DJ booth and why she was there. Instead of having any kind of remorse she turned to me and said “I’m here to make a request” with a very eager look on her face, to which I responded “Absolutely not.” This did not register and left her in shock and unwilling to leave at which point I knew we would never be on the same page. So it ended in her getting escorted back to her circle followed by her making evil eyes at me while all my friends and I shook our heads in disbelief while mouthing “Unbelievable.” She still didn’t understand why anything was wrong with any of this and thought I’d done her a great injustice by not letting her back in or playing her song. I’m not sorry.  

Join Alinka for B(e)ast at Dalston Superstore on Saturday 6th December from 9pm – 3am.

Sci-Fi Is A Drag!

By: Dr Sharon Husbands

This Friday at FLHOSTON PARADISE we’ll be celebrating the whacky, weird and other-wordly!  The party name itself references a film that makes the list below, The Fifth Element!

One of the best things about Science Fiction is the way some of its best artists play with gender, usually through makeup and costume. And what do us tranny-whores (careful, you can’t say those words out-loud or the gender and sex police cum on you) love more than playing with gender? Below is a (highly subjective and not-at-all exhaustive) list of some great gender bending moments in science fiction film and television that might inspire your look:

10. The Junk Lady, Labyrinth

Ok, both 10 and 9 actually fall in the genre of fantasy, but now one cares about genre anymore, do they?

The Junk Lady was just fucking awesome. She wanted Sarah to become a hunched old hag: so did we. Anyone who wouldn’t wanna funk with Bowie’s package in a muppet filled labyrinth needed something terrible to happen to her. The look requires some architecture experience and great balance. 

Runner Up: Mommy Fortuna from The Last Unicorn, bitch used horns to achieve a new level of fierce! Again, this is F-to-F drag at its best. 

Mommy Fortuna

9. Orlando, Orlando

Tilda Swinton plays Orlando, ordered to stay young forever and doing so across sexes and sexualities. So many looks to choose from and really, this one is about the costume change – show up in princess garb and knock ‘em dead as a dandy on your way out.

8. Jadzia Dax, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

In keeping with the long-life sex-change theme, we call upon a simple Trekky-fetish look that will win over the nerdy gaymers out there: JADZIA! A host for a parasitic worm-alien that inhabits bodies over its lifetime. Dax’s past friends can’t ever seem to get their gender pronoun right. It’s like a weekend in Berlin, really.

Jadzia Dax Star Trek DS9

Also: LESBIAN KISSING:

DS9 lesbian kiss

7. Curtis, Misfits

Another TV related top tenner and another simple look, for lazy queens like me, there’s Curtis. Curtis starts out as the object of the affection of a girl who’s super power is to make men horny (really? That’s not a power that just RAPEY). He then switches his time travel powers to sex swapping powes, getting stuck in his female form for quite some time and experiencing pleasure in ways HE never imagined.  Simple orange jumpsuit and a wig to take on and off will do. 

6.  Thomas Jerome Newton, The Man Who Fell To Earth

Ok, so I had Tilda, so I had to have Bowie. Also, Mary Lou, HELLO. Do her looks! Amaze. But yeah this is like an important alien moment with some boy glamour thrown in. Useful, important, and already worn by so many. 

5.  Cinna, The Hunger Games

As with Curtis above, this is an easy one, but super effective and good for the fashion student who fancies themselves a “club kid” (which is anachronistic and highly questionable, but let’s not get into disco politics, shall we?). This film is like a MAC Superstore, so pick and choose, but I love a simple pandrogyny look.  Oh and yeah, it’s probably not science fiction, but remember my point about about genre? ALSO some fan made these which makes me really happy (cause they have so much time and Photoshop).

Cinna Hunger Games

4. Dren, Splice

Dren is a humanoid figure formed by the copulation of Fred and Ginger, two multi-animal hybrids. Dren is a fierce timely look and great for baldies. Also, her “mom” changes from Ginger to Ginge later in the film, cause animals can do that. Humans can too, but the NHS has a waiting list.

Dren Splice

3. Plavalaguna, The Fifth Element

There a plenty of hot looks in this film, try em on. But for the drag queen, this DIVA takes the cake cause she got TALENT to back up her HOT LOOK. It’s not just about being pretty in a dress, it’s also about wowing the crowd. 

2. Barbarella, Barbarella

Everyone I asked said this first, I was reticent cause she’s cis-gendered and I did that a bit at the start of the list BUT. Maje looks. Hot realness. Do it. Also, clearly John Sizzle’s main source of inspiration.

Barbarella

1. Frank N. Furter, The Rocky Horror Picture Show

The alien transsexual that started us all off on our path to bisexual party play. She wins. 

Frank N Furter

Below is a horrid video of a tv of “Rose Tint My World” which shows many new tranny Dalstonites on their first time in heels on stage…

Honourable Mention:

Ruth Patchett, She-Devil

Roseanne plays the best drag mommy ever. 

Join us tonight (Friday 11th July) for Fhloston Paradise with special guest Luke Solomon at Dalston Superstore from 9pm – 3am.

Superstore & Voodoo Ray’s at Glastonbury

We are honoured to back at Glastonbury this year! The Superstore crew take over the Downlow Radio room on Saturday night – expect festival pumpers from Hannah Holland, Josh Caffe, The Lovely Jonjo and Mikki Most.
 
Also in the Downlow over the weekend you can catch Berghain residents Tama Sumo, ND_baumecker, a Frankie Knuckles tribute from David Morales, Luke Solomon, Danny Krivit, Seth Troxler, Jovonn, James Hillard, Luke Howard, Grizzle and loads more.
 
Luke Howard at Glastonbury
 
In case you were wondering the NYC Downlow is the wold’s only travelling gay disco and we think it’s probably the best place in the entire world.
 
If that wasn’t enough, our pizza sisters at Voodoo Ray’s are bringing down their brand new trailer and setting up shop in the Block9 field (right next to The Downlow). ALL your pizza needs will be fulfilled, in fact over the weekend the chefs will be making pizzas until 7am to refuel you and keep your hangover at bay. 
 
VDR at Field Day
 
Dalston Superstore at the NYC Downlow
Hannah Holland, The Lovely Jonjo, Josh Caffe, Mikki Most
Saturday night in the Downlow Radio room, Block9
 
Josh Caffe and The Lovely Jonjo at Glasto
 
Voodoo Ray’s at Block 9
–       Wednesday 19:00-03:30
–       Thursday 15:00-04:00
–       Friday 15:00-07:00
–       Saturday 15:00-07:00
–       Sunday 15:00-07:00
–       Monday 10:00-16:00
 
VDR trailer at night
 
Join us this weekend in the Block9 Field at Glastonbury Festival, Pilton, Somerset.

Classic Goodybag Giveaway

Just ahead of this weekend’s next Classic Music Company party, they’ve had a dig about the office and filled another Classic tote bag with goodies (including signed vinyl) for us to give away. 

They’re teaming up with local heroes Paris’ Acid Ball for a whole night of two-floor bumpers and pumpers and all-round acid mischief. Classic boss Luke Solomon is joined by Hannah Holland and DJ Squeaky in the basement whilst upstairs Horse Meat Discoer Luke Howard and Superstore head honcho Dan Beaumont takeover.

For your chance to get your mitts on a Classic goodybag plus free entry for you and a pal to Saturday’s party email the correct answer to hello@dalstonsuperstore.com by 12pm (noon) Friday 6th September.

*only the winner will be contacted

Which other Luke will be joining Luke Solomon this Saturday?

a. Laidback Luke

b. Luke Whostalking

c. Luke Howard

Join the whole gang this Saturday 7th September at Dalston Superstore for Classic X Paris’ Acid Ball from 9pm – 4am.

Kevin McKay

By Sigmund K

On the 5th of July, Ubermax returns to the lazer basement with Glasgow Underground’s boss Kevin McKay, a man who has been in the industry since the ’90s and who has, amongst other many achievements, discovered Mylo, and released steadily throughout the decade on his own label. In the ’00s, Kevin spent most of his time managing the career of his artists, releasing only a few records on GU, until a couple of years ago when he decided to re-launch the label and do what is the most important for us; release amazing music. We asked him a few questions ahead of Ubermax…

Kevin, you decided a couple of years ago to re-launch Glasgow Underground (GU), which looks like a brilliant decision when we look at the quality of all the new releases. It seems that your whole career has been fed by the need of picking up new challenges, was reviving GU a new challenge or did you feel that people were getting back to the older house sound?

I think that’s part of the joy of working in music. You’re never allowed to rest on your laurels for too long: the scene changes too quickly. There is a real change-or-die mentality that runs through the music business. Obviously you see that everywhere to some extent, but in music I think it is all the more evident. Luckily I get bored quite easily so I’m always looking for new things. I signed Mylo and set up Breastfed partly as a reaction to how serious house music had become. This time round it’s a bit different. I had spent the last four or five years doing too much of the business side of running a label and wanted to get back into the creative side. Glasgow Underground had put out the odd release since 2002 but I hadn’t really done anything with it due to my commitments to Mylo and Grum. I was also really enjoying where house/dance music had ended up post minimal and electro and so when I started making tracks again, it seemed like the perfect home for them.

GU has recently launched a series of compilations, with the first edition mixed by JD Twitch from Optimo. Can you tell us a bit more about this project, and can give us some hints about the rest of the series?

I love compilations but there are so many fantastic ones that people can get for free these days from the likes of RA, Fact and Data Transmission that the idea of putting up something for sale just because it’s a great selection of music seems a little out of date. As well as this, dance music is now a truly global phenomenon. As a DJ in the ’80s and ’90s you might come across the odd record from outside of the main dance music strongholds; the UK, the US and mainland Europe, but it was rare. Nowadays there are thriving dance scenes from Melbourne to Mexico City with their own collectives of DJs and producers. I wanted to create a compilation series that reflected this and gave the listener a kind of audio rough guide to a city’s underground scene. I started with Glasgow as it’s probably the city I know best. Keith/Twitch is a brilliant DJ, has great taste in music and was using Ableton at Optimo when a lot of laptop DJs were still at school. He also stands above the cliquishness that often permeates through Glasgow’s club scene. Those reasons meant he was the best person to give an eclectic, inclusive snapshot of the homegrown Glasgow club scene in 2013. 

In terms of future editions, there are loads that I want to do but I also want to make sure that I get the right people to do them and if that means waiting for DJs/producers other commitments to finish before I get to do a certain city, so be it. Hopefully I’ll be able to announce the next volume soon.

The Glasgow scene looks like it is exploding, and exporting more and more young talents. We are big fans of that scene at Ubermax as our past guests include Ooft! and Sei A. What do you think is Glasgow’s role in the global dance scene?

I hear a lot of DJs cite nights in Glasgow as some of the best DJing experiences they’ve ever had, so I guess on one level, Glasgow provides the kind of hedonistic underground scene that delivers world-class DJ experiences. Not that I’m gloating about Glasgow, its just that in a city that doesn’t boast the riches of London or New York, where it seems to rain for 11 and a half months of the year and where the population apparently have the highest rate of heart disease in the world, there has to be one good reason to live there.

If there’s anything that I’ve learned from starting out as a DJ and producer in Glasgow it’s how important it is too keep your feet on the ground. There’s a healthy you’re-only-making-dance-music-son-it’s-not-a-cure-for-cancer style reality checkpoint awaiting anyone who starts putting on too many airs and graces. It is also a common Scottish trait not to praise people for fear that “they will get too big for their own boots” and so when you do get props, you know it’s truly well deserved. And while I don’t think a lack of praise is the best way to encourage new talent, I do think that people that come through the Glasgow scene retain a down-to-earth-ness that can be lacking in well-known producers from other places. 

Over the years you’ve been an excellent spotter of new talent. Are there some young artists that you really like at the moment? Or that will appear on GU and that we haven’t yet heard of?

Cheers! I really enjoy the A&R process. There are a few producers from Glasgow that I really like right now. Some (and hopefully all) of these will appear on Glasgow Underground in the future; Barrientos, ThoseBeats, Mermaids. Outside of Glasgow we have a single due from London/Bristol based Bxentric that Cosmic Kids, Phil Kelsey and I have remixed and there’s a new producer from London called Lumino who’s also recording for Danse Club and has an EP due on GU. As well as that, there are loads of people not on the label that I’m into. I do a monthly radio show on www.sceen.fm that archives on the Glasgow Underground Soundcloud and you’ll find loads of new music and producers on that.

Let’s talk about London now… What is you experience of London as a DJ? Can you tell us your best and worse London gig memories? 

I haven’t DJed in London for a while so I’m really looking forward to it and in terms of experiences, I’ve never had a bad one in London, I guess I’ve just been lucky. My favourite place to play in the past was a straight tie between Kenny Hawkes and Luke Solomon’s Space @ Bar Rhumba and Harri’s night at Plastic People (when it was on Oxford Street). 

What are your next challenges for the future?

Keeping working in music and having as much fun as I can doing so!

Join Kevin McKay this Friday 5th July at Dalston Superstore for Ubermax from 9pm – 3am.

Five Minutes With Dave Kendrick

Dave Kendrick returns to Superstore this Saturday with a Macho City dream team in tow, consisting of himself, Severino and Charlie Porter. The three of them takeover the top bar for our second Classic Records party, whilst the laser basement plays host to Classic boss Luke Solomon, Chris Duckenfield and Dan Beaumont!

We spoke to Dave ahead of tomorrow’s party to find out all the latest updates in Macho…

What is currently on repeat on your stereo?

I’ve dug out Daft Punk’s – Homework again for obvs reasons. It’s still as berserk as ever.

I’m also listening to a radio recording of the Paradise Garage 2nd Birthday Party with Larry Levan in the mix.

Tell us the Man Of Macho for 2013!

Ron Swanson from Parks & Recreation! He’s the ultimate Man of Macho. He loves Meat! And Hunting! He’s Hot!

Ron Swanson Man Of Macho 2013 

What are your favourite defunct nights of London- what would you resurrect given the chance?

Garage at Heaven, Queer Nation at the Gardening Club and The Cock!

Best DJ set you’ve seen or heard recently?

Tama Sumo at Dance Tunnel was by far was the most inspiring set I’ve heard in ages. She was like an artist, playing B side vinyl jams, weird drum tracks, Chicago and Detroit oddities. The place went crazy.

Who is your ultimate Macho City icon?

Giorgio Moroder by a mile.

Giorgio Moroder Macho City Icon

Why should everyone support same sex marriage?

Because they’re fabulous. Gay weddings should be enforced by law, for everyone.

With Dalston having been bathed in sunshine this week- what is your go-to summer music to play out?

House Music!

Join Dave for the Macho City top bar takeover at Classic X Superstore #2 this Saturday 27th April from 9pm – 4am

Win A Classic Goody Bag!

Next weekend sees one of our favourite record labels, Classic Music Company, return to Superstore for another amazing team-up! Classic boss Luke Solomon is joined in the laser basement by Chris Duckenfield and Dan Beaumont, whilst upstairs it’s a Macho City takeover with Severino, Dave Kendrick and Charlie Porter all taking to the decks.

Ahead of the party, the lovely people at Classic have sent us one of the amazing and super limited edition hand-printed Dalston Superstore X Classic tote bags FILLED WITH CLASSIC TREATS to give away to a lucky winner!

You too can look as good as Honey Dijon and Classic co-boss Derrick Carter showing off your Classic tote around town…

Honey Dijon and Derrick Carter

All you have to do to be with a chance to win is email the correct answer to hello@dalstonsuperstore.com by 10am Tuesday 23rd April with the subject “I NEED A DALSTON SUPERSTORE X CLASSIC BAG!”

Only the winner will be contacted.

Who runs Classic Music Company with Luke Solomon. Is it…

a. Beyoncé Knowles-Carter

b. Aaron Carter

c. Derrick Carter

Join Luke, Chris, Severino and more at Dalston Superstore on Saturday 27th April for Classic X Superstore #2 from 9pm – 3am. 

Image courtesy of Honey Dijon’s Instagram.

Luke Solomon

Luke Solomon is one of the true heroes of house music. From the legendary midweeker Space that he ran through the ’90s with the late (and much missed) Kenny Hawkes, to the hugely influential Classic Music Company he started with Chicago’s Derrick Carter, Luke has always championed the underground, the leftfield and anything that makes you move. Now that Classic are bringing the party to Superstore, Luke kindly answered some of Dan Beaumont’s questions…

You have been prolific in the studio lately… What drives your creativity?

Mostly sadness, pain and sorrow, oh and anger and frustration… I find it quite hard to be creative when I am happy. I usually use the happy periods to finish the music I made when I was unhappy. Well you did ask…..

The Digital Kid… An analogue experiment… Whose side are you on in the format wars? 

I am generally at war with myself in the format wars. My mind constantly contradicts itself. I buy digital music continuously. I also buy physical music continuously. What I have begun to realise is that they are almost like two completely different worlds running in tangent to each other.

It’s kind of interesting because at Classic we do one thing, i.e. we release vinyl, run vinyl exclusives, and then do digital.

But at Defected, we will release digital, then if the record does well, we will release vinyl post release….

So I like both… I just hate the downside of the internet… i.e. piracy and idiotic people.

And I dislike the fact that it’s so hard to sell vinyl and break even on it….

But the world needs a balance of both.

Why does HOUSE need Classic now more than ever?

I think house needs a a community again, especially in the UK. I think that the whole scene became fragmented by egos and people just looking out for themselves. I guess money and a rubbish economy naturally does that to people. Both Derrick and myself feel that that selflessness needs to be injected back in order to grow a world of great music within our scene that is not just centred around a DJ using a label as a vehicle in order to rule the world and be the next biggest thing ever.

What do you argue with Derrick Carter about?

We don’t really argue. Especially not about music. We have had our moments, but those are generally because we are both being big old grumps. Nothing more.

What are you looking forward to in 2013?

Paint testing parties. And the rise of the welly sock. 

What record do you wish you had signed?

Knights Of The Hunted – X The Beat.  But it got lost on my hard drive after Parrot sent it to me and Toddla and Raf picked it up. We got to release the vinyl though as compensation.

What tune has spent the longest time in your record box?

I always take something by Spencer Kincey. He’s my musical good luck charm.

Join Luke Solomon, Dan Beaumont, Rob Mello and Severino for Classic X Superstore on Saturday 26th January from 9pm – 3am.