Posts Tagged ‘Prosumer’

Bottom Heavy

On Saturday, the Laurel and Hardy of Dalston and legendary DJ’s, Dan Beaumont & Wes Baggaley,  are joining forces to get you all bumping and thumping to some deep homosexual house with their brand new night: Bottom Heavy! Having both been prominent figures in London’s queer nightlife for over a decade and played some of the most infamous parties around the globe including The NYC Downlow, we are pretty sure that these two bottoms know how to throw a TOP party.

Despite their quite sickening resumés and having been pals for years, its actually the first time they’ve collaborated together! Don’t worry huns, this isn’t the only venture for the duo. Later in the year, Dan and Wes will be playing back-to-back at Farr festival alongside Prosumer, Tama Sumo and Lakuti! 

To get you lubed up and prepared for Bottom Heavy, Dan and Wes had a little chinwag amongst themselves! Read on to find out what these two legends think about the state of London’s LGBTQ+ Nightlife, their most played records and whats on the horizon for them both!

 Dan: Can you remember the point in your life that house music grabbed you?

Wes: I do actually. I was still at school and too young to go clubbing but I remember when Steve Silk Hurley’ ‘Jack Your Body’ and Raze ‘Break For Love’ were in the UK charts and on Top of the Pops. I remember the video for ‘Jack Your Body’ having a bucking bronco in it. Then there was the whole acid house /rave thing in the tabloids. I became mesmerised by it. I used to buy 7-inch singles every week with my pocket money from being really young and I remember buying ‘Jack Your Body’, ‘Love Can’t Turn Around’ and Inner City ‘Good Life’ on 7inch. The first house music 12 inch I bought was Lil Louis ‘French Kiss’ in 1989/90 which I still have and still play.

Dan: I remember all those weird cartoon videos they threw together for those Chicago house records that became hits. Also remember thinking ‘who is Steve Silk Hurley and why isn’t he in his video?’ Then I got totally obsessed with Betty Boo.  

Wes: What inspired you to open Dalston Superstore? 

Dan: I met Matt and other Dan (DSS co-owners) when they were running Trailer Trash, and I was doing a party called Disco Bloodbath. As promoters, we often had problems with venues, and talked a lot about starting our own. Eventually we began looking in earnest and around 2008 we found the site that became Superstore. It had been empty for a couple of years before we found it. We just wanted to create a space where the people who came to our parties would feel at home, where the music, drinks and food were all good and our friends could be themselves.

Dan: What sounds are you looking for when you go shopping for records to play out? What are you trying to communicate through DJing?

Wes: That’s a tough one. I like a really wide range of different music and play various styles but when I’m looking for sort of functional dancefloor records I tend to be drawn to quite energetic stuff with lots of percussion. I’m a massive fan of the old Cajual, Relief and Dance Mania Records and always tend to gravitate towards that type of jacking type sound. I also like disco and I’m a sucker for a disco sample but I don’t like playing the same sound all night. I just tend to play what feels right at the time, could be soulful, disco, acid, techno, hypnotic deep stuff, jazzy stuff, ravey breaks type stuff, broken beat, African percussion.

Wes: You’re partly responsible for some of the best LGBTQ+ parties around at the moment including my favourite, Chapter 10. What are your thoughts on LGBTQ+ clubbing in London at the moment, especially with a lot of venue closures in the last 5 years? 

Dan: I personally think that LGBTQ+ clubbing is very inspiring right now. Adonis, Discosodoma, Homodrop, PDA, Femmetopia, Gay Garage and loads of others are all pushing underground queer music and culture to new places. Unfortunately the gay scene is still affected by misogyny, internalised homophobia, body shaming, transphobia and masculine bullshit, but it seems like more interesting voices are starting to come through, which means more creativity and more talent steering queer clubbing. Also it’s exciting to see groups like Friends of the Joiners Arms, Resis’Dance, and London  LGBTQ+ Community Centre (all rooted in queer dancefloors) disrupting the status quo.

Chapter 10 Dan

Dan: What do you think are the positives and negatives of LGBTQ+ clubs right now?

Wes: I also think it’s a very good time for LGBTQ+ clubbing at the moment. In spite of a lot of the recent venue closures there are great nights popping up in non LGBTQ+ clubs. Seems to be a sort of creative DIY culture happening which is great. There same is happening in other cities like Manchester with great nights like Meat Free at the White Hotel and Kiss Me Again at the Soup Kitchen. There’s some great music events and brilliant cabaret stuff going on at the likes of The Glory and The RVT. As you mentioned, the internalised homophobia, transphobia and misogyny needs to be addressed. A lot of the fetish venues have closed down and some of the bigger LGBTQ+ fetish nights in London are struggling to get venues. I do think this is a vital part of the culture that is dwindling. I reckon we need a LGBTQ+ fetish rave with good music. 

Dan: Good point about all the amazing queer parties outside of London!

Wes: Can you tell me some of your favourite producers and record labels at the moment?

Dan: Labels: Lionoil, Let’s Go Swimming, Lobster Theramin, E-Beamz/Hothaus/UTTU, Not An Animal, Ransom Note, Sound Signature, Stillove4music, Dolly, The Corner, Work Them, Mistress. Producers: Telfort, Powder, Mr Tophat & Art Alfie, Jay Duncan, Midland, Jonny Rock, LB Dub Corp, Stephen Brown, Garrett David, Steffi, rRoxymore, Pariah, and everything Luke Solomon touches. Loads more that I’ve forgotten!

 

 Dan: I love it when you find a record that you know intimately from the first bar to the outro, and it does a really long stint in your bag. What are your most played records over the past couple of years?

Wes: I’ve got a few of them. I’d say my absolutely most played record is Braxton Holmes and Mark Grant –The Revival on Cajual, which has never left my bag in 20 years. I actually need to replace it because I’ve almost worn it out. Also the Maurice Fulton Syclops ones, Where’s Jason’s K, Jump Bugs and Sarah’s E With Extra P are go to tracks but luckily he’s just released another album of gems. The man’s a genius. There’s Kinshasa Anthem by Philou Lozolo on Lumberjacks in Hell that came out a couple of years ago that I’ve played a lot, and then there’s that Danny Tenaglia remix of Janet Jackson – The Pleasure Principle that I’ve owned for many years but didn’t know what it was until I heard you play it at Phonox haha

Dan: I’ve totally stolen The Revival off you. It’s pure magic.

Russia Wes

Wes: Tell us a bit about the idea behind Bottom Heavy. What can we expect?

Dan: The main idea is so we can play together all night and I can steel your tunes! Whenever I’ve heard you play, I can hear a sound in between all your records, a sort of energy that I’m always searching for myself. It’s hard to describe, but it exists in the space between that jacking Chicago sound, leftfield Detroit stuff and tribal New York tracks. Plus also jazz, afro, techno, electro and disco elements. As we mentioned earlier, here are loads of great gay nights popping off, but I think what’s missing is a really great HOUSE all-nighter that joins the dots between all those sounds. 

Wes: Haha! Well there’ll be a lot of tune stealing going on because I’ve been known to have a sneaky peek through your bag as well. 

 Dan: Back to your earlier point about Fetish nights. Why are they important to the gay scene? Are there any you remember particularly fondly? If you were to throw a fetish party, what would the vibe be?

Wes: With the fetish thing I thing it’s important to have those spaces where you can dress up and sort of act out your fantasies and do whatever you want within reason. I’m actually not massive into the sexual side of it myself believe it or not, but I do like the spectacle of the whole thing and the dressing up and the fact people are free to express themselves sexually at those nights without judgement. Sadly a lot of the fetish nights are also men only parties that go hand in hand with the whole gay misogyny thing. 

 A few years ago me and my friend Lucious Flajore put on a fetish night at The Hoist which is now closed. The night was open to everybody, gay, bi, trans, heterosexual men and women. The soundtrack was dark disco, slow brooding techno and weird electronics in one room where we also had alternative cabaret and showed art house horror movies and in the other lighter room we played disco and showed John Waters films. 

 The atmosphere was great but we had problems with the sound and there was no dancefloor to speak of then the venue closed. We also had a problem with heterosexual men complaining about gays (I know right? At the Hoist!). I am actually thinking about re-launching the party at a new venue and putting in a good sound system but making it more LGBTQ+ focused and making sure people know that women and trans people are more than welcome 

Dan: That sounds amazing. You need to make it happen!

Dan: OK last one from me. Who is your biggest DJ influence?

Wes: That’s really tough but I have to say Derrick Carter. I first heard him play in about 1995 and became obsessed. I loved the way he seemed to mix different styles with ease and mix the records for ages.

Dan: I used to go to his Classic residency at The End religiously, and would always try and describe tunes that Derrick played to people in record shops the following week. I never had any luck. I was probably trying to describe about three records being played at the same time.

Wes: And for my last one I’m going to fire that question back at you and also ask if you have any music coming out soon?

Dan: I’ve got a bunch of music nearly finished that I need to sort out. I’m going to lock myself away and do that. Arranging tracks does my nut in. 


 Catch Dan & Wes at Bottom Heavy Saturday 23rd June 9pm-3am at Dalston Superstore!

Tusk Turns Three!

This February sees an important anniversary of one of our favourite parties, Tusk! Promoters Ant C, James Baillie and Chris Camplin have been bringing over some of Europe’s most impressive underground electronic music talent to our lazer basement for three years now! With previous guests including Andrew Weatherall, Craig Richards and Doc Sleep, we can’t wait to see what they have planned for 2018. They’re kicking it all off with Ostgut Ton legend and Dalston Superstore favourite Prosumer! We caught up with the boys to chat past highlights, favourite club nights and 

You guys have been throwing your TUSK night at Superstore for three years now! That’s awesome, happy anniversary! How did the three of you meet and start promoting together? 

Ant C (AC): Thanks! Time sure has flown. It’s been a lot of fun. Thanks for having us! I’ve known the boys socially for years from out an about around London.

Chris Camplin (CC): Yeah, we would bump into each other at our favourite dance floors – in fact I think I met both James & Ant at Horse Meat Disco initially. I know James came back to my place for a post-HMD afterparty one bank holiday Monday.

James Baillie (JB): It became obvious we all had a love for music, so I took the idea to Chris and Ant about us doing our own night and TUSK developed from there…

For those that have never been to your party before – tell them what it’s about (and what they’re missing out on!)

CC: Amazing music, great DJ lineups, stellar crowd, lasers and that awesome DSS basement sound system.

AC: Yep, that pretty much sums it up. We just want people to have as much fun as we’re having. I do love me some lasers! We bring in some extra lasers for TUSK and the boys have started calling me Laser Minelli. I kinda like it!

If you had to sum up the TUSK sound in one track, what would it be?

CC: For me it would be – Tiga – Love Don’t Dance Here Anymore (C2 Remix 1)

AC: Tough question – I think it would have to be Markus Gibb – Tohl (Original mix) – Always seems to go off, plus I tend to layer it up with a vocal loop from Voodoo Ray, which fits nicely.

JB: For me it would be Shake It by Fantastic Twins.

Who have been some of your favourite guests over the years?

AC: We try to keep things fresh by working with people who have something individual to bring. Doc Sleep was awesome – she really worked us out. Ewan Pearson for his musicality. A Love From Outer Space (Andrew Weatherall and Sean Johnston) when they took over the basement all night for our Pride Special in 2016. Ketiov was great too and a world exclusive for us!

CC: Ketiov, Doc Sleep & Nail have been some of my faves.

JB: A Love From Outer Space, Craig Richards and Doc Sleep.

Has there been an overall highlight for you?

CC: Being able to book some of my favourite DJs and producers at one of my top clubs.

AC: As Chris says, being able to work with some of the people we have admired for years. Everybody has been super nice and its been interesting to hang out and chat with them about their experiences and get their advice and input.

Your special birthday guest is Prosumer – why did you choose him to ring in your fourth year?

CC: I think Prosumer has a special place in all our hearts and we’ve been discussing booking him for some time now and everything just landed into place!

AC: Yeah – absolutely. I met him at Glastonbury a few years ago and we got chatting and stayed in touch. I think he liked what we were trying to do with TUSK and seems much more open to working with people on that basis, rather than just going for the huge shows. I tried to make it happen during 2017, but we couldn’t make the dates line up – so the third birthday party seemed the perfect choice to have him with us!

What are some of your favourite club nights in London at the moment?

CC: Of course at our sisters Discosodoma and Homodrop at Superstore are up there along with the legendary Horse Meat Disco.

AC: All of the above. I’m also enjoying the residency programs that XOYO and Phonox are running – its interesting to get somebody else’s take on who to put together to make a cohesive night of music.

JB: Similar really – A Love From Outer Space, Chapter 10, Discosodoma and Horse Meat Disco.

Any DJs that you would love to work with in the future?

CC: Sure, we have a big list forming. The Honey Soundsystem guys, Midland, The Black Madonna, Octo Octa.

JB: Felix Dickinson, Black Merlin, Job Jobse, Superpitcher, Massimilliano Pagliara.

AC: The list goes on – Jennifer Cardini, Justin Robertson, Optimo, Mike Servito, Marcel Vogel, Derrick Carter – who knows? Watch this space…

Are you pulling out any special surprises for your birthday that you can let us in on?

AC: Now that would be telling…

JB: I’ve got a good few head melting tracks that are not coming out until Spring…

CC: You’ll have to wait and see!    


Catch Tusk at their Third Birthday Bash on Saturday 24 February from 9pm-5am at Dalston Superstore!

Nick V

By Pavliné


After the Berlin edition, the SWEAT crew is now looking at Paris for its second bash at Dalston Superstore. For this special dance edition, it just seemed natural to invite Nick V, the DJ who took it upon himself to bring expressive dancing back to the forefront of the clubbing experience during his eight year residency at Mona in Paris! After a ten year hiatus from playing in London, we can’t wait to welcome him to the lazerpit. We caught up with him to chat about the importance of dance as a cultural force, starting an independent label, and musical discoveries!

Hey Nick, first of all and for those who might not know you, could you tell us a bit about yourself and your DJ career?

I was born in Manchester in the UK and lived there for 17 years until 1987. My parents are Franco Vietnamese but the start of my life was very English. Coming from Manchester, music was a strong part of my life. During the 70s and 80s so many new popular music genres were born, including the ones that laid the basis for today’s dance music culture.

I moved to Paris in 1987 and started DJing in 1993, specialising in the more soulful side of house music, from the disco inspired garage sound to the jazz grooves of deep house, still a strong part of my sets today. My first gigs were at Queen club on Champs Elysées opening for US house DJs to a predominantly gay crowd. The people running the club were very strict about having the dancefloor full so I learnt how to push a crowd and challenge myself as a DJ. I was looking for more musical freedom though, so I started the first of a series of residencies in Paris in 2003, playing a mixed bag of records to a mixed crowd. This is was the beginning of what I am doing today at Mona where retro house fuses with newer sounds, vintage disco and jacking acid house or techno.

Tell us a bit about your residency at Mona and what makes this party so special?

Mona started in 2008. At the beginning it was the continuation of my previous residencies in Paris. We weren’t that successful at the start. We decided to turn things around in 2010 by inviting younger cats to play at the party and instantly the crowd started to change, especially when the My Love Is Underground crew (Jeremy Underground and Brawther) came. We like to invite back regular guests such as Daniel Wang, Prosumer, Honey Dijon, Karizma, Giles Smith or Mike Huckaby.

The dance “element” is quintessential to the party ?

The big change came when we started to get involved in the Paris dance scene, putting on events for dancers and also for non-regular dancers who still loved to dance, via the Mona dance class at the start of the night.

I have always been a dance enthusiast but I noticed that except for one or two very specialist exceptions, dance wasn’t really happening in the clubs. I found this is a shame as many dances started in the clubs.

Pavliné: This is where the idea of dance classes came from?

I wanted the ordinary non-dancers to be at the centre of things. With the help of some of the best dance talents Paris has to offer, we set up the classes, devoting the first hour of the night to dance, free and open to all and especially beginners, with every month a different teacher coming down to teach house dance, voguing or waacking.

We then started throwing, every three or four months, kiki vogue balls and now dance contests that incorporate vogue, waack, house dance and even more, so that some of the more regular dancers could show their moves. We make sure the atmosphere stays very relaxed though and having fun is our priority, for the hardcore competition vibe you need to attend the battles! With dance our crowd changed and the party changed with the positive energy that comes with it.

Pavliné: If you had to choose one record to represent Mona?

I like to break tracks into my sets and turn them into Mona classics that the crowd recognise instantly. There have been quite a few over the years. The big one at the moment is the e-smoove remix of Taylor Dayne’s I’ll Wait that dates from 1994.

 

It’s a bit of old news now but Paris has experienced a sort of dance music revival. Can you tell us a bit about that and how does it feel for someone like you who’s been part of the scene for a lot longer than that?

As I said earlier, things haven’t always been this way. About eight years ago parties in Paris were much less diverse than they are today – the successful ones were more orientated towards the minimal techno sound dominant at the time.

Many people were going to clubs outside of France, to Berlin, London or Barcelona and bringing back new ideas and a fresh outlook on clubbing. So it was only a matter of time before they started to do their own thing over here, with the vibrant energy of the younger generation challenging established promoters and pushing boundaries, even literally, with new alternative venues appearing far away from the centre of Paris, which was unheard of in the past.

That’s how it started, in reaction to the lack of a scene. I believe that’s how things happen, so I don’t really mind when things go “bad”, it’s always part of a cycle and there’s always something new and interesting that comes afterwards.

Jeremy Underground and Brawther played some of their first gigs with you. Who are your more recent discoveries and artists to watch?

I’m very much into the Australian producers of the moment such as Harvey Sutherland or Jad and The. In France there’s Gary Gritness, an amazing multi instrumentalist and a great set of producers who produce both house and hip hop such as Neue Graphik, Mad Rey or Hugo LX who signed the first release on my new label.

As you mention it, can you tell us a bit about the record label?

Mona Musique is a project that has been in my head for a while and I have only just started to find some free time to make it happen. I have been curating music for a while and receive a lot of good stuff, so setting up a label was the logical step forward. I wanted to link it to my party Mona, and the idea is for tracks to be designed for the party, incorporating and appealing to its different aspects: the dresscodes, the thrill of the dancefloor, the mixed crowd and the creativity of the dancers. The first release is out now and I am working on the next set. I have come to realise how hard it is to maintain a consistent level of releases and a steady work rate, so hats off to all the longstanding independent labels!

What can we expect from your set at Superstore?

I haven’t played in London for over ten years so I’m quite excited about the idea of coming over, and thank you very much for the invitation. I never really prepare my sets that much, I throw into my box a good mix of classics and recent records that I’m feeling, and everything comes together on the spot depending on the vibe, how people feel and how they react to what I’m playing, so I can’t really say much more in advance.

I must say I like it when people come to dance with an enthusiastic and open mindset, and that they don’t take things too seriously, it doesn’t matter if you don’t know who is making the music, fun always comes first for me. I try to keep this in my own mind myself when I play, so if you see me dancing then it’s a good sign!

Finally, can you think of a track that would fit the tropical and hedonistic aesthetic of SWEAT?

This traditional Gwoka drum track from Guadeloupe in the French Antilles and released on London based label, Sofrito, is fast becoming a Mona classic. It’s a super DJ tool sitting well between any genres and putting dancers into a trance. The kind of track that lets your body take control.

I bought that record when it was released a few months back but never got to play it in a club. If you do play it on the 19th, you can be sure I’ll be dancing on my ass off!


Catch Nick V at Sweat Dance Party this Friday 19 May from 9pm-3am at Dalston Superstore!

 

Gideön

Gideön is a man of many talents and inclinations – and a serious force to be reckoned with when it comes to throwing a party you’ll never forget! One of the creative masterminds behind arguably the best place to party at Glastonbury – Block9, he is also the owner of a record collection many of us can only dream of, and manages to find the time to manage the super-successful Downlow Radio. Between all this madness, we caught up to pick his brain ahead of this month’s Tusk


Hi Gideon! We can’t wait to have you here for Tusk. What have you been up to over the past few months?

Musically I’ve been playing out a lot… Spunking all my money on records and generally being irresponsible. I’ve be in Berlin quite a lot too. I am doing a club night out there with Yoni who runs Horse Meat Disco over there. We’ve been going out a lot, searching for venues and looking into a few sites that might work for the club.

I’ve been pouring a lot of time and energy into my weekly radio show on London’s Soho radio too. The SohoJams show has been going from strength to strength and my list of up and coming guests is pretty epic – Prosumer, Robert Owens, Bicep, Mr G, Luke Solomon etc.

My Thursday evening slot between 8-10pm is a little oasis in my crazy schedule at Block9 (The set design arts partnership I co-direct with my business partner.) The show is a time when I can do what I want, play what I want and say what I want. I cherish it, it’s sacred to me.

As the one of the masterminds behind the NYC Downlow, how have you watched it transform over the years?

Myself and Steve (my partner in Block9) created the NYC Downlow together. We have watched it grow over the past nine years into a fine thing. The set itself has evolved and become loads more elaborate. At next year’s Glastonbury we will be celebrating it’s 10th birthday and we have some MAJOR surprises up our sleeve. I take care of the music at the Downlow and it’s been amazing to watch it kinda take off. We have so many amazing DJs dying to play records with us now… It’s kind of a nightmare. We have our regular residents who are amazing DJs and then there are the super famous legends of house asking for slots too… Whats a man supposed to do?????

It seems to have been onwards and upwards for Downlow Radio ever since its inception. What’s in the pipeline for 2016?

The Downlow Radio (DLR) is about to get a complete makeover. We have been working on a super flashy new site that will play on phones, tablets and computers and will still function perfectly. The new DLR will continue to feature killer mixes – both live recordings from our venues at Glastonbury and DJ mixes from the friends and family of the NYC Downlow… Watch this space!

Can you tell us a bit about your Northern Soul night, Soulhole in Berlin?

Soulhole in Berlin is a bi-monthly night run by my partner in crime Joshua aka DJ Husband. It’s a killer little party that features homocentric soul, funk, disco and vintage gospel – kinda grown up music connoisseur tunes for the bearier boys of Berlin. It’s a really nice night. I’m just a resident there – it’s Josh’s night though!

What, to you, are some of the most exciting things happening in the London clubbing scene at the moment?

Good question… London clubbing is kinda desperate. So many venues are closing and so many of the ones that remain underachieve. I’m not really sure how to answer this question. It’s really hard to find the right tunes, the right venue and the right people all at the same time!

We have heard a lot about your incredible vinyl collection – what is the most precious record of them all?

Precious in terms of monetary value it’s gotta be Barry Whites’s first ever tune. Barry White & The Atlantics – Tracy from 1964 on Faro records.

In terms of the record that is most precious to me….there are a few. I think probably it’s gotta be one of the ultra rare gospels 7”s like I Am A Soldier by Shirley James on Gospel Express from 1978.

A favourite curveball to throw to keep people on their toes?

ZKY – Bassline tool. Great to chuck into a deep house set to noise people up a little bit!

Can you tell us in three words what you have in store for Tusk?

Deep Hard Homo

Catch Gideön alongside Terry Childs and Sean Johnston at Tusk at Dalston Superstore on Saturday 28 November from 9pm-4am.  

Happy 5th Birthday DSS

By Cliff Joannou / reprinted from QX Magazine with kind permission

Dalston Superstore put queer East on the map five years ago. With an incredible array of club nights, combining explosive DJs with the most mentalist drag queens and trannies, you don’t get more bang for your buck than a weekend at the ‘Superstore. Owners Mikki Most and Dan Beaumont plied Cliff Joannou with plenty of prosecco and told him just how they pull it all together every week…

CLIFF: Why is Dalston Superstore the dog’s bollocks?

DAN: Come down to our birthday next Sunday and we’ll show you…

You’re on. How has Dalston itself evolved over the past five years, and what impact has the ‘Superstore had on the area…

DAN: When we started out people thought we were crazy trying to open a gay bar in Dalston! 

MIKKI: Yes, we were pretty much the first bar in the area, and certainly the first gay bar, so I think people thought we were mental. We’ve opened up a lot of doors in the area for people though, and it’s been amazing to be part of helping make Dalston more diverse. It’s been stressful at times but the booze helps!

How have you set it apart from other gay venues?

DAN: Music, booze, food and fun! You never know what to expect at the ‘Superstore. You could find Grizzle reenacting the Human Centipede on the bar – don’t ask! – and then pop downstairs for dance courtesy of some hot young DJ we’ve found in New York or Berlin.

MIKKI: Yes, we’ve always tried to push things a bit here and not just do the obvious stuff. We both ran clubs before [TrailerTrash and Disco Bloodbath] and putting on great DJs is fundamental. We’re open day and night, and I like the idea you can come for a decent cocktail and some food early evening and still be here at 4am in the morning dancing… There’s not too many places offering that in London.

For such an intimate club spot, you’ve had some very cool DJs jump at the chance to play there…

DAN: The best thing about programming your own discotheque is that you get to bring all your favourite DJs over to play. Highlights for us have been an amazing set from Prosumer in the early days, Erol Alkan dropping a disco set, the legendary David Morales playing for four hours, and multiple visits from people like Optimo, Horse Meat Disco, Chloé and Spencer Parker. Plus, our amazing residents – it wouldn’t be the same without Hannah Holland, Borja Peña, the Little Gay Brother guys, Lovely Jonjo, Dave Kendrick, Jos Gibson and the Duchess of Pork et al.

MIKKI: Absolutely, we recently had the guys over from Members Club in Berlin for B(e)ast and the music was really amazing and fresh for London. It’s great to have the freedom to bring over international talent and introduce it to our scene over here.

And it’s the place to put a wig on it…

MIKKI: It’s part of what we are and to be honest all the best nights I can remember at ‘Superstore have involved wigs and heels flying around all over the place. So many of our regulars turn up in flats and leave in heels, it’s what gives the place its sparkle.

DAN: [Laughs] Yes, our bar very often gets mistaken for a stage by our bewigged regulars doesn’t it? We wouldn’t be the venue we are without the support of people like Jonny Woo, A Man To Pet, John Sizzle, Jacqui Potato and Glyn Famous. In fact we are still in awe of their talents… not to mention their ability to stage dive in heels on a Friday night without sustaining any injuries.

Dalston Superstore (117 Kingsland High St, E8 2PB) celebrates its 5th birthday over the May Bank Holiday weekend with the main party on Sunday 4th May.