Posts Tagged ‘Hannah Holland’

Kid Batchelor

By Hannah Holland

A pioneer of the musical explosion on ‘80s London who DJ’ed at many of the revolutionary clubs of the time, as well as making legendary records… We are honoured to have Kid Batchelor spin in the laser pit at Paris’ Acid Ball this week, and learn a little history along the way…. 

Hi Lawrence aka Kid Batchelor. You were born and bred in Hackney. Must have changed a bit?? What was the music scene like when you first wet your toes?

When I started playing records in the ‘80s the music scene was simply electric. London was a maelstrom of creative activity. I could dazzle you with sparkling anecdotes aplenty from acid house-era London and beyond – if I could remember. A gentleman has no memory. 

I was born in Hackney, my family and I lived in Clissold Park, and I remember growing up near Hoxton. Just some of the changes I have witnessed over the last 20 years… It went from NDC to ultra-trendy enclave, with real estate developers tripping over each other to get a slice of the action.

What happened in ‘Shoho’ circa 1986, it was akin to East Berlin post ’89, meaning a foray into uncharted territory. Artists attracted by large open plan spaces and low rents moved in. It used to be cheap. Now though, property prices are much higher. The greasy spoons have given way to bijou restaurants. We have witnessed this happen to Soho and Shoho, Dalston has been trendier than Chelsea’s heyday for the last few years, but now Hackney has posted the ‘full-up’ sign there too. London venues and its electronic arts are in danger of being priced out of the city. It’s the Manhattanisation of London. 

Today according to a recent report London is officially the most expensive city in the world. From the price of a beer to bus fare to the shoe boxes that people call home. And, of course, rents continue to rise but salaries are staying the same; so what’s a gal/guy, to do?

Overheard as I passed a young couple standing outside an estate agents window in Shadwell this week: Him: “No that’s a garage.” Her: “Oh!”

What turned you onto DJing and where did you start?

My Adventures On The Wheels of Steel, so to speak, corresponds with the dawn of hip hop, which has just turned 40. I heard a set by DJ Cash Money, just from seeing him on the decks scratching to the funk; he’s had me as his love slave since. Forty years on from the first inklings of hip-hop filtered out of DJ Kool Herc’s decks: allowing one song to segue into another, at a Bronx house party in 1973.

Together with Jazzie B, Tony Humphries’ KISS FM MASTERMIX SHOW, and Tom Moulton’s High Fidelity, concepts that single-handedly created a new industry of remixing-producing records with greater dance impact. His super-sonic frequency design went much further than Motown ever did. Tom brought out the “blood and guts”, the things that really count in a song. These relationships played a huge role in my own development as DJ of 30 years standing. 

 Kid Batchelor

I was also hugely interested in disco, which became so ubiquitous it choked on its own backlash, and clouded the minds of suburban fans who forgot that the music had already been a big part of black, Latino, and gay culture for a half-decade. Disco died in 1979, or so they say. In truth, its influence metastasised throughout dance music. House music was disco in the raw. Frankie Knuckles and the other gay African Americans who invented house music began the process of rescuing disco from its own excesses by stripping away the clichés and reconnecting it with its subversive counter-cultural roots. When house music became the dominant popular style in the early 1980’s, first in Chicago then in NYC, San Francisco, LA, and all the other major US cities, before spreading across the country and the world.

Your work has been heavily influenced by New York ‘80s underground music scene, what was your first experiences of the music and the city? Must have been so fresh…

As in London, so New York was a hotbed of energy and ideas i.e. Keith Haring’s immersion in New York’s downtown cultural life; he quickly became a fixture on the New York artistic scene, befriending other artists like Jean-Michel Basquiat and Kenny Scharf, as well as many of the most innovative cultural figures of that period e.g. Fab Five Freddy. The role these relationships played in Haring’s development as a public artist and facilitator of group exhibitions and performances was very important, and I just thank god for my late friend Keith Haring who introduced me to Larry Levan at his ‘Party Of Life’ at the Paradise Garage.

Party Of Life flyer by Keith Haring

He knew what the latest records and the dances were; and artists like him went out at night and listened to music and danced a lot, they painted in the daytime that was the whole idea – it was all seen as one. Jean Michel Basquiat too, was an artist whose work symbolised a Cultural Movement, which had at its centre break-dancing, graffiti art and rap music. Through his work, he came to prominence in New York.

The late Dennis Hopper was also a connoisseur, he spoke about Afro-American Pop-Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat in the following terms: “He has it all. Basquiat used to walk these streets with hundreds of thousands of dollars in shopping bags from his art sales. He enjoyed contradictions, art critics found him confusing. I don’t have any cynicism about him, however, he never said very much in interviews, yet there was a big idea to his art. He stands for a inquest post-modern type of beauty. He does something a lot of painters today want to do, but with theirs it comes out too controlled or twee, with Basquiat it’s alive. He had an incredible natural faculty…”

New York’s late ‘80s and ‘90s Sound Factory, Paradise Garage, Ballroom Culture and acid of Music Box is some of our biggest inspiration for Paris’ Acid Ball. You went to some of these clubs, what was the impact it had on you?

Believe me when I say this, I think it changed my perceptions of what was possible. 

I have always loved radio, especially from the US. Ever since I was a teenager collecting music – I fell in love, from then on the obsession grew and now I’ve been catapulted back, reflecting this knowledge and appreciation of the popular music of my youth. 

How did London and New York compliment each other back then? 

An important factor in making London a global Mecca for electronic arts is its cultural and social diversity (at least as great as New York).

In such a hotbed of energy and ideas, the process of reinvention never sits idle. For gangs of individuals driving such change, this city of 7.8 million people can support niche clubs and intensely-focussed musical style and act as a perfect playground in which to sculpt and grown our reputation as, yes, the artistic capital of the world. It’s like a nappy, the contents has to be changed regularly.

But if you looked at London in the mid ’80s, with its 3am license in the West End only, and compared it to New York (the city that gave us disco and hip hop with clubs like Area, Danceteria, Paradise Garage, The Palladium, CBGB) you might have laughed at the notion that London could supercede New York by the mid ’90s. 

It is easy to locate the parallels and synergies between British and American Pop Art of the 1960′s and ’70s. Clive Baker’s work can feel, despite it’s ‘Britishness’, like a celebration of the popular that we have come to associate with the USA. Such is the power and profile of Warhol, Lichtenstein, Wesselmann et al, that it is easy to forget that the genesis of Pop Art lies not in New York but in London. 

You were DJing at the legendary Soul II Soul party at the Africa Centre. It seemed like a perfect slice of London’s music scene, creating something totally unique. What was your experience of it? What were the big tunes you would play there?

Thirty years ago, Thatcherism was a boom/bust economy; racism was a street reality as well as a nightclub door policy. A tough pressured time, it led to the emergence of one of the most radical club scenes in the world. Thank heavens for the Funki Dreds aka Soul II Soul (SIIS )– a legendary sound system that became a Grammy award winning soul act. Headman Jazzie B took me in as just a Kid (hence my handle) who could rock turntables’ and together we tore club culture apart.

The Funki Dreds

Our music policy was Afro/soul. We hooked up with crews like Wicked Pulse (Soul Kitchen), Family Funktion, Norman Jay and Nellie Hooper’s Bristol Massive (The Wild Bunch/Massive Attack). Jazzie’s music became steeped in seventies James Brown beats and classic revival tunes, whereas I moved forward towards electronica, new sounds, garage and house etc. Although I am still down with the Funki Dreds we never overcame that crucial fissure, me to the future, they to the past. 

The late ’70s and the early ’80s reggae imagery – of painted medallions, fists, sensi plant or leaf, images of the Ethiopian Emperor who died in 1960s and was considered divine by Rastafarians, Zion – a referencing to Jerusalem and the Emperor Haile Salassie is believed to have been Christ incarnate, and so on gave way to ’80s African imagery, long canvases decorated these dance halls like Africa Centre in Covent Garden; so we got musical forms with its own imagery e.g. Soul II Soul, Funki Dred.

I’ve been commissioned to make a radio programme about Soul II Soul, a musical ideology which has remained at the avant-garde of what many describe as an oxymoron, British soul music. Yet in the eighties one man and a group of friends took on that transatlantic cynicism and nullified it in the most revolutionary style imaginable. That man was Jazzie B, and his friends, a bunch of talented singers and performers who had all until then been denied any major form of success. But with Soul II Soul these singers’ names became familiar with millions of lips, as SIIS became the neologism of London and then the world. 

What do you think it was about the UK that embraced the explosion of acid house in1988?!

London has been a hugely successful Mecca for the electronic arts enthusiasts over the last couple of decades, for a variety of reasons… among them: its cultural and social diversity. The development of the one-nighter club format from the early ‘80s, Warehouse parties. Pirate radio. Home-grown UK producers (in the 80s) and pioneering musical genres (Jungle, UK garage, D&B, dubstep). Sound system culture. Gay and polysexual scenes. Its size. And its party people, who made the parties matter in spite of 2am licenses and other restrictions.

In the ’80s, a new sound emerged across London’s dancefloors – a plethora of musical communities and sub communities – house, new beat, garage, techno and balearic beats. This sound exploded right across London and beyond, under the Acid House banner (smiley faces), which conveys the heady days of the Balearic spirit for those who can only dream of having been there.

Give us an insight into your record box gems of the time.

Too many favourites, hundreds in fact, but Will Downing – In My Dreams is one that popped to the head of the queue when I read your question. In half an hour it could be a pet Bas Noir, or a Fast Eddie’s Let’s Go, or some new, young artist from Croydon or Italy. Tough and electronic sounds.

I played all the best tunes during the rise of each genre – electro, rap, funk, house. During the late 1980′s acid house era, I shifted towards a more radical model of uniting art and music technology. 

Your Bang The Party records were some of the first proper UK house cuts to emerge on the scene, how did Bang The Party come about ? 

Dance act Bang The Party (founded 1986), originally a trio including Keith (KCC) Franklin, KCL Project. But then were downed to two, Lesley ‘Bullet’ Lawrence and I. 

Release Your Body, with Derrick May, an acid house fave, was followed by Bang Bang You’re Mine, a garage classic. We also released an album, Back To Prison.

Since those golden times you’ve gone on to be a creative director for London’s best super club Fabric, a regular record player in Europe (particularly Italian Rivera), worked on various TV projects + host a weekly radio show Mi-Soul. What advice would you give to a young Londoner stepping out to play music?!

The single ingredient you’ll need in spades is PASSION. And a lot of LUCK.

Nobody does dedication like James Brown, the minister of super heavy weight funk and social commentator. Here’s his charming point of view …

“Put your hand on the box and feel this,
Lay your hand up there and feel it,
If you got any kind of soul you got to feel it.”
 (James Brown, I Got To Move)

GET the message? This is not for the feckless or faint hearted. What you hold here is a funk bomb, primed to vaporise lethargy. A compound of full-length, full-strength masterfunk. An hour or so of GET UP and go. The jungle groove.

Sadly, in the industry as in life, being the best you can be isn’t necessarily a winning formula. All ironically, in the words of The Last Poets “We started on the corner and ended up in the square”.

Join Kid Batchelor this Saturday for Paris’ Acid Ball at Dalston Superstore 9pm – 3am.

Hannah Holland’s Heroes of 2013

By Hannah Holland

10 things I’ve discovered – rediscovered, obsessed over and loved this year.. art and personal heroes of 2013!

Sister Rosetta Tharpe

Sister Rosetta Tharpe

Fierce women from the ’30s and ’40s that influenced Elvis and Little Richard. Love this women, what a powerhouse. BBC4 did a great doco about her this year, which was great as she’s rarely written about.

Xander Gaines

Xander Gaines

I met this magical person in New York, he is living breathing art and made me want to make a track inspired by how much I love New York!! Check out my Live It EP on Get Up from earlier this year!

Gay Bingo 

Gay Bingo

Jonny Woo, John Sizzle and Ma Butcher made the final 10 year shebang at Hackney Empire, a huge moment in East London herstory. Also I went on an Australian tour with them earlier in the year for Mardi Gras, which was a riot!

Connan Mockasin

The smooth tones of this album have been keeping me company whenever I need some delights upon the ear…

David Bowie

Bowie exhibition at the V&A

Always a constant obsession with Bowie, but his exhibition at the V & A was endless and incredible.

Alex Noble – Creatures From The Kaleidoscope 

My good friend and partner in Batty Bass, Alex Noble, had his first ever solo exhibition, which incorporated his talent into all the different mediums he works with, under the themes of death, spirituality and conscious awakening. The scope of work was beautiful and I’m dead proud!!!! 

Alex Noble’s Creatures From The Kaleidoscope from Ryan Lanji on Vimeo.

Black Gold Buffalo 

Black Gold Buffalo

Loving playing bass for exciting new band Black Gold Buffalo with my amazing girls Keziah and Anna Argiros. We played gigs all over London this year including Lovebox and Loco Disco festival… next year we’ll be releasing some music, watch this space, we’ve been busy in the studio!  

Goldfrapp

Goldfrapp

Wow the new album  Tales Of Us is totally sublime, classic sounding, I can’t stop listening.

Laurie Anderson

I’ve always known about Laurie Anderson, but it took me ’til this year to become obsessed. Maybe the beautiful words she wrote about Lou Reed and his death drew me in, but I can’t get enough of her brain power.

Savages

Savages

I haven’t felt this much excitement for a band since I was about 14. The girls totally kick ass live and their album is killer, stripped back to its raw energy and the message – Silence Yourself. 

Yoko Ono 

What a woman! She curated this year’s Meltdown Festival, and it was the best line up I think I’ve ever seen there!!! Iggy Pop, Savages, Kim Gordon, Bo Ningen, Peaches, Siouxsie Sioux etc and lots of Yoko’s art throughout the South Bank centre. A great moment in London for 2013 especially women in music

Kim Gordon

Kim Gordon

I love this pic I took of one of my teenage heroes Kim Gordon.

Check out Hannah’s latest mix for more heroes…

And join her TONIGHT in the laser basement for Little Gay Brother Present Studio 54 NYE Tuesday 31st January at Dalston Superstore from 9pm – 4.30am.

Caffe Culture

Ahead of tonight’s Grizzle Cosmic Fembot Extravaganza we pinned down man about town DJ/Producer Josh Caffe. His debut release Caffe Culture Pt 1 is out now on Batty Bass featuring the track Let Love Ruin with David Newtron and remixes from Hannah Holland, The Carry Nation and Leo Zero! He told us all about the track and more!

It’s Grizzle’s Cosmic Fembot Extravaganza tonight… what/who is your sexy robot pick?

 I love the fembots by Hajime Sorayama. Proper sex bots.

Sorayama Sexy Robot

How long has Caffe Culture been in the making for?

For quite some time. I initially came about idea late last year but I wasn’t really sure whether to do it or not as it was my first production and vocals project and I kinda felt a bit out of my depth. I’m quite a perfectionist with my music and wanted this project to be 100% amazing but didn’t feel confident enough…..I overcame that!

Working with Jeroen (aka David Newtron) was such a natural process too, we really bounce off each other with ideas, which made things a whole lot easier in the studio writing or messing around with random objects for instruments. The guy managed to get me to sing! Never would have dared try that on my own.

Which remix of Let Love Ruin can we expect to hear tonight?

I’m hoping to squeeze all of them in. They’re all good!

Who is your biggest inspiration for the record?

Without a doubt Jamie Principle.

What prompted your personal transition from DJ to producer?

It just felt like the right time… and also meeting the right people to collaborate with at the right time. I love DJing to bits, but being able to play out something you’ve produced and worked day and night on is such an amazing feeling. Really makes me want to produce more and more and DJ more and more. Just want to constantly keep sharing good music with people really.

And you sing too! Who are your vocal heroes?

I do! That was a hard experience, which I didn’t like at first since I’m not a natural singer at all. But the more we worked on Let Love Ruin the more we felt it needed more than just a simple hook. I really had figure out how my vocal limit/range could work on things and ALSO I hate the sound of my voice so I criticized everything but Jeroen was like “seriously Josh this is good!”

Vocal heroes would have to be Ralph Tresvant, Robert Owens, Vikter Duplaix, Larry Ernest Blackmon (to name a few).

Describe your ideal music video for Let Love Ruin…

Ummm, I’m having discussions about potentially doing one so I can’t really say the idea otherwise it will ruin the surprise when you see it. It would be my dream idea if it happens though.

Who would you just die to collaborate with?

Todd Terry, Sonny Fodera.

What’s next for Caffe Culture?

Well Caffe Culture comes in two parts so we’re just finishing up the second release As I Look which will be out later in the year. Watch this space!!

Join Josh TONIGHT (Friday 11th October) for Grizzle’s Cosmic Fembot Extravaganza at Dalston Superstore from 9pm – 3am.

Hannah Holland’s Activathuh Mix

Paris’ Acid Ball queen and Batty Bass head honcho Hannah Holland lays this hot mix on us to brighten your Friday! Featuring tracks from some of our favourite people including Cormac, The Carry Nation, Shaun J Wright, Ashworth and recent laser basement guest Brodanse, it’s sure to have you slipping on your dancing shoes. Get hyped for tonight courtesy of Miss Holland.

TRACKLISTING!

Ashworth - Changry  [Native City]
Auntie Susan - Triangle [Forthcoming on Batty Bass]
Cormac - Tone Alone [WetYourself! Records]
Ashworth - Cash Soup (Aggborough Remix) [Native City]
Shaun J Wright & Alinka- Love Inspired [Classic Music Company]
The Carry Nation & The Cucarachas - Oracle (Dub) [Tribal Records]
 Josh Caffe & David Newtron - Let Love Ruin (The Carry Nation Remix) [Batty Bass]
Christy Love - I’m Goin’ Under (Hannah Holland Dub) [Get Up Recordings]
Brodanse - Activate ft Cari Golden [Danse Club]

For more on Hannah Holland and Batty Bass visit : www.battybass.com

Classic Goodybag Giveaway

Just ahead of this weekend’s next Classic Music Company party, they’ve had a dig about the office and filled another Classic tote bag with goodies (including signed vinyl) for us to give away. 

They’re teaming up with local heroes Paris’ Acid Ball for a whole night of two-floor bumpers and pumpers and all-round acid mischief. Classic boss Luke Solomon is joined by Hannah Holland and DJ Squeaky in the basement whilst upstairs Horse Meat Discoer Luke Howard and Superstore head honcho Dan Beaumont takeover.

For your chance to get your mitts on a Classic goodybag plus free entry for you and a pal to Saturday’s party email the correct answer to hello@dalstonsuperstore.com by 12pm (noon) Friday 6th September.

*only the winner will be contacted

Which other Luke will be joining Luke Solomon this Saturday?

a. Laidback Luke

b. Luke Whostalking

c. Luke Howard

Join the whole gang this Saturday 7th September at Dalston Superstore for Classic X Paris’ Acid Ball from 9pm – 4am.

Classic Society Tracks

Ahead of Society’s residents party this Thursday, we asked the collective to pick their quintessential Society tracks, the songs that really sum up their most successful outings taking into account all the acid and Chicago house luminaries that have graced their decks. Not only did they come up with a cracking selection but they also sent us this amazing deep house mix from Joshua Ford who’ll be playing on the night…

Kieran: 

 
 
Marshall Jefferson – Move Your Body (The House Music Anthem)
 
We brought Marshall Jefferson over for our second big warehouse party a few years ago, ably supported by Superstore’s own Dan Beaumont and Dissident’s Andy Blake. We took over a dirty old car park in Shoreditch and filled it up with lots of acid house lovers – only problem being I misplaced (ahem) the Chicago’an in the middle of Shoreditch on a Friday night. After a frantic search around the whole of Shoreditch, we found him a few roads up from the venue giving two excited guys his autograph. He came in, full of smiles, jumped straight on the decks and played an absolute belter, with this track being the highlight. Lovely, lovely chap, and a pretty damn good DJ/Producer.
 
Ciaran:

Frankie Knuckles Presents Satoshi Tomiie (Vocal by Robert Owens) – Tears
 
This record is everything. Beautiful simplicity, a heartfelt lyric and haunting vocal sung with such tenderness by Robert Owens. Tears encapsulates everything I love about music and was the genesis that sparked my love of house music. We have been fortunate to host a series of intimate Society happenings with Robert over the last year, a journey that culminated this summer in his set on our stage at Farr Festival. Surrounded by the darkened forest, Robert sang Tears. Wearing a brightly coloured feathered hat, met by a sea of smiling faces, friend, family, the whole tent dance and sang along. It was our second year collaborating with Ransom Note’s Wil Troup, pulling together a fantasy line up to play the small but fantastic Farr festival. It was a night I won’t forget, a record that is everything.
 
Henry:
 
 
 
Hannah Holland – Paris’ Acid Ball
 
When we first came up with the idea for Society we decided that while the focus would always be on a legendary DJ from the era, we would also feature another headliner; a younger DJ influenced by the sound. For our first event at the Metal Works we booked Hannah Holland. Hannah killed it and has since played for us numerous times, always delivering an amazing set. My choice is Hannah’s massive 2010 release “Paris Acid Ball”, her homage to the Jackin’ Chicago sound.
 
Nicola:
 

Phuture – Acid Tracks 

My pick has to come from The Don himself, DJ Pierre. We brought him over from Chicago for a huge warehouse party celebrating all of his (many) aliases. I remember going to pick him up from the hotel to escort him to the venue (we weren’t going to make the same mistake we did with Marshall!) and feeling pretty nervous about finally meeting him. On the way to the venue he was asking me what we wanted him to play, there was me, telling the inventor of acid house what to play! ‘Acid tracks’ sums up the sound and movement that the man himself started and means so much to me and many, many others.

Join the Society residents this Thursday 29th August at Dalston Superstore from 9pm – 2:30am for Society Presents Robert Owens.

Roxy

Our good friends at Batty Bass Records have been kind enough to share this amazing interview with the legendary Roxy! Superstore fave Josh Caffe sat down to Skype with the Love To Do It vocalist to talk about the latest Ride Committee track, Guess Who, and about coming over to London…

Listen to Ride Committee feat Roxy – Guess Who out now on Batty Bass…

Find out more about Roxy via her Facebook fanpage: www.facebook.com/ROXYTHEARTIST

The Carry Nation at Paris’ Acid Ball

Tomorrow night we are pleased to welcome our good friends The Carry Nation to the Dalston Superstore laser basement for Paris’ Acid Ball!!! Comprised of Nita Aviance and Will Automagic, these New York wunderchildren are in the process of finishing up their current European mini-tour that took in Batty Bass, Horse Meat Disco, Glastonbury and more! And there’s just time for one last hurrah/Glastonbury Love-in Reunion with Hannah Holland, Dan Beaumont, DJ Squeaky and Cathal. We caught up with one half of The Carry Nation, Miss Nita Aviance herself to find out how their magical team-up came to be, their hot NYC tips and so much more…

What lead to you guys naming yourselves after Carrie Nation?

Nita: One day we were working in the studio and took a break, Russ Meyer’s Beyond The Valley Of The Dolls happened to be on the TV, and y’know, for a couple of us who happen to “carry on” all the time, it seemed really appropriate haha.

How did you both meet?

We’ve known each other for years actually. We’ve been DJing a lot of similar parties, known a lot of the same people, worked at each other’s parties a lot- have each other guest DJ. But the production team started when Will had all these great out-takes from his Escandalo project with Viva Ruiz and Desi Santiago and he said to me “I’m gonna give these to all of our friends!” and I said “Oh no you’re not! Let’s make a track! This is a record.” And that’s where This Bitch Is Alive came from. We really just clicked quite well in the studio, it was so easy, and it came out so well, so, it was on!

Describe The Carry Nation’s perfect summer NYC night out?

Ohhh, the perfect night out? I don’t know… it would probably have to be one of our parties! We’ve been doing a lot of loft and warehouse stuff right now, mostly at The Spectrum. But I think my favourite one we did recently was just us for nine hours, track for track. It was kind of a big night in Brooklyn, there was a lot of different parties… we go late! But yeah, it was really just nice and easy and effortless to play together for that long. And you really get to explore so many musical places that way. That’s really what we like to do. I’m from the school of LONG long sets. That’s how we were raised. Raised on the dance floor.

You’ve just played the Batty Bass warehouse, Horse Meat Disco at the Eagle, Block 9 at Glastonbury, then back to London to play here at Dalston Superstore. What kind of venue style suits The Carry Nation best?

I think the thing about The Carry Nation that works really anywhere is the fact that Will and I have had so many years playing records in a lot of different places in New York, as New York has changed over time- from big clubs to small bars to now, Brooklyn warehouse stuff. We’ve had the sound evolve and we’ve evolved with the sound. It’s always basically house music with a strong influence from everything that’s going on around the world. So I think it allows us to go anywhere and play in any kinda space…. Also, y’know, trying to bring all the music with you that you might possibly need can be a bit of an exciting chore haha… god love USB sticks now!

Which queer DJs across the world have influenced your style the most?

Coming and playing here in London has been really wonderful. Especially all the different people that we end up playing with. Because it really is a variety. From Junior Vasquez from when we were first coming up, to Severino right now- one of the most positive, joyous, energetic DJs that I know. But y’know, travelling all the way over to Australia even, you really get a sense now that it’s a global underground culture. And we really are all pushing the same thing. I always say it’s just about a beat, if it gets you on the dance floor, if it gets your asses shaking, then that’s all that’s necessary! It’s the same everywhere.

You recently released on Batty Bass Records. Why did you decide to release on a UK label?

I don’t even remember how we discovered Batty Bass but it came up somewhere and we really liked the stuff they were putting out. When I enquired from friends in London about Batty Bass and about Hannah Holland, they immediately said “Yep. That’s where you need to go. This is the kinda girl doing the exact same thing as you’re doing in New York right now.” And we wanted something to help expand the sound out of New York. It can be really insular there and, like anywhere, you can just put out stuff for you and yours. But we wanted to make it more global. It was our first choice and when she signed the record I couldn’t have been happier.

You mentioned working with Viva Ruiz for This Bitch Is Alive… what other vocalists, past or present, are on your wish list?

Oh my god, well, we’re actually working on a new record right now with Tigga Calore that we’re very excited about, and we just remixed N’Dea Davenport’s incredible voice on the upcoming Automagic release. And we’re producing Escandalo’s next record too. It’s so exciting to have people come to us and be interested in working with us. For us, it’s never really so much about working with a full vocal as it is cut ups and stuff so it’s exciting to be getting into that. There’s so many really great rappers coming out of New York City right now and that’s where the sound is…

Like who?

Le1f, House Of Ladosha, Zebra Katz, Cakes Da Killa… they’re all our friends and they perform at our parties in New York, so it’s really a great house-hip hop mix, which is really the roots of all this anyways.

Who are the best New York hidden gems we should be listening out for?

Other than us?! Goodness… well, House Of Ladosha really is incredible. Juliana Huxtable really is just a muse to the whole scene right now and has just started DJing. We found out she was gonna play one night so we went to see her and really had our minds blown. The track selection, from someone so young, it was amazing how far back she could reach, not to mention she’s just like a beautiful alien and we love her.

Juliana Huxtable 

Fatherhood is really an amazing group, made up of Physical Therapy and Michael Magnan. They’re our brothers in arms over there. They did a remix of the track, Warriors, that we did with The Cucarachas. Their stuff is brilliant and they play HARD. They get you to the dance floor.

How long did it take to wash all the glitter off from your amazing photoshoot you did with Leo Herrera?

Hahaha, oh god, probably not as long as it took to touch us up afterwards! The thing that’s wonderful about working with somebody like Leo is that he’s so fast and he has a vision. And we really only needed to give him a few words… it’s wonderful working with your friends that way. The crew that we have in New York is so close, we all cross over with each other… it really benefits the process. You get to move quick and you get exactly what you’re looking for, even if it’s not what you know you’re looking for yet! But yeah. Glitter. Glitter was everywhere. And we didn’t even use all the glitter! We ended up saving it for our next party which I didn’t have to clean up haha! 

 The Carry Nation by Leo Herrera

Tell us about your amazing artwork…

It’s all done by Troy Clark, who’s an amazing visual artist from New York. I’ve been working with him for a very long time on my personal stuff and it was the right move going with him for The Carry Nation. It was another one of those things where we just toss out a few key words and we just let him go with it. He knows us well and comes to all of our parties, knows exactly where we’re going musically. So he’s able to drive the artistic and visual vision. Which is fantastic because we can take what he does on the posters and incorporate it back into the parties… in terms of design in the space. 

The Carry Nation poster by Troy Clark 

One song that is currently soundtracking your summer…

That is a tough one… I’m gonna have to say it’s the new track we made with The Cucarachas, we literally just can not stop playing it, even for ourselves at home. Not to brag and boast, but, it’s just the song we’ve all been having in our heads for a long time. It came out so quickly and so easily; it’s wonderful working with Tom Stephan and Borja Peña. It just clicks. And after playing it out so much here in the UK- apparently it works! We’re very excited to get that out to everybody’s ears.

Join The Carry Nation here at Dalston Superstore for Paris’ Acid Ball on Saturday 6th July from 9pm – 3am.

Nic Fisher’s Totally Fetch

Friday sees Gutterslut’s Nic Fisher join us for the Totally Fetch: Fringe! Vs Mean Girls official afterparty, alongside Hannah Holland, Duchess Of Pork, Kostakis, John Sizzle and Vangelis & Tareq. And to get us in the mood, the lovely Nic made us this totally fetch mixtape which we’ll be alternating between that and re-watching Mean Girls so we’re fully armed with every imaginable (and amazing) line ready for the quote-a-long tomorrow night at the Rio Cinema. Make sure you get your ticket from the Rio’s website!

TRACK LIST:

1. Round Table Knights – So Good (Teenage Mutants Remix)
2. Nicone – Why (Monte Remix)
3. Kolombo, Compuphonic – Sand Storm (DeMarzo Remix)
4. LouLou Players, Kolombo – Don’t Go Away (Zombie Disco Squad Remix)
5. Nick Curly – Underground (Dennis Ferrer Remix)
6. Flashmob – Hot (Original Mix)
7. Dusky – Nobody Else (Original Mix)
8. ReKreation – Before Me (Leftwing & Kody Remix)
 
Join Nic at Totally Fetch: Fringe! Vs Mean Girls Afterparty on Friday 12th April from 9pm – 4am at Dalston Superstore.

5 Totally Fetch Mean Girls Quotes

With Fringe! Film Festival kicking off around East London tonight, we caught up with organiser Alexander to find out a bit more about their party here next weekend. On the day of the party, Fringe will be hosting a quote-a-long screening of cult teen classic Mean Girls at our wonderful neighbours The Rio cinema, followed by a HUGE afterparty right here at Superstore! Hannah Holland, Nic Fisher (Gutterslut), John Sizzle, Duchess Of Pork and Kostakis will all be raiding their record boxes for fabulous tunes for dancing to. Way better than prom anyway.

For your chance to win a pair of tickets to see Mean Girls and for free entrance to the afterparty, email the correct answer to the following question to hello@dalstonsuperstore.com with the subject “Totally Fetch!” by 10am Tuesday 9th April to be entered into our prize draw.

Who wrote the screenplay to Mean Girls? Is it…

a. Tina Fey

b. Tina Gay

c. Tina Hey!

Ahead of both the screening and the afterparty, we asked Alexander to pick his top five Mean Girls quotes and why he loves them…

Never has feminism been brought to the point so succinctly as by Gretchen Wieners…

All you ever needed to know about sexual health, pregnancy and death by intercourse, as explained by Coach Carr.

Regina George, as seen by her adoring schoolmates. The pretty face of bullying gets away with just about anything. Never has having your face punched been so awesome.

I love Gretchen Wieners and it was hard to choose between Gretchen cracking and Gretchen being really sorry that she’s so popular. But it had to be the latter.

There’s so many good things about this clip I don’t even know where to start. Being half a virgin? Regina’s all carb diet? No, it’s most definitely Karen’s psychic powers. It’s really helpful being clairvoyant.

 Join Alexander at Totally Fetch: Fringe! Vs Mean Girls Afterparty here at Dalston Superstore on Friday 12th April from 9pm – 3am

SOS

We’re extremely honoured to announce that Jim Warboy and his hugely influential night SOS will be joining us here at Dalston Superstore in its brand new monthly home. Ahead of the relaunch at the beginning of March, we caught up with Warboy to speak to him about his illustrious past shaping London’s clubland over the last decade and what’s in store for SOS’s future. And he’s even dropped this HOT HOT mix on us! To say we’re excited is not quite cutting it…

In your years of running amazing clubnights, how have you seen the east London scene evolve and what would you personally want to further alter?
 
The East End scene has exploded over the past 10 years. I know a lot of people moan about the East End and the ‘hipsters’ but I actually think it’s still a very exciting place to be. There’s a lot going on and if you look around there are so many great people to meet. Of course, I get irritated by the way it’s seen as a new territory or market by some businesses but as long as people continues to celebrate the diversity that made it special in the first place then there should still be something for everyone.

One thing that gets on my tits is the amount of parties on offer being run by promoters who end up mimicking other nights that they consider successful or popular. I always encourage all budding promoters or partymakers I work with to stir things up more. Kick ideas around, throw different elements into the pot and then give a good shake. In my experience that’s what generates new and exciting ideas. Risks need to be taken at some point. It’s not always easy but it’s definitely worth it in the long run.

Which of your previous nights do you feel had the biggest cultural impact?
 
This is like asking a parent which one is their favourite child.
 
Over the past 9 years I’ve been lucky enough to work with some great people like Matthew Glamorre on Kash Point, K-tron on All You Can Eat, Leo Belicha on Caligula, Laurence Malice on Heroes, plus the team at SOS. These different partnerships have helped each night create some level of impact but probably in different ways.
 
It’s not an easy thing to measure but one under-estimated impact of all of club nights is that they’re often a place where people meet for the first time, forging out new friendships and working relationships, which often go on to influence culture in music, art and fashion for years to come. I’ve seen that happen time and time again.
 
Clubland has a lineage which is like a baton being passed on from one generation to the next. We are all part of an ongoing cultural impact, providing we keep developing and nurturing ideas that will be adopted, mutated and hopefully replaced by the next generation. 
 
Do you miss any of the defunct ones?
 
I miss all the nights I’ve been involved with, but I see each one as a part of my overall experience that I then carry forward to the next one so that tends to stop me getting too sentimental. 
 
What’s the most insane or elaborate outfit you’ve ever spotted whilst DJing?
 
I’ve seen such a plethora of outlandish outfits, but what’s more interesting is that almost every venue I’ve ever been in was more shocked by nudity than any whacky outfit. When I’ve had naked performers, or the occasional partygoer, I’ve had to intervene with security and management to stop somebody being thrown out or forced to get some clothes on simply because they’re starkers. One person naked in a room can create a stronger reaction than the wildest outfit. I just don’t get that. I mean we’re bloody born naked. What’s so outrageous about that!
 
Tell us a tale from the craziest SOS party you ever had…
 
Some of the earliest SOS parties at Old Rehearsal Studios in Kingsland Road were pretty trippy. We’d spend a couple of days setting it all up with a catwalk in the main railway arch for the Voguers,  a pop-up beach café, a Bedouin chillout with incense, candles and fresh fruit, plus a polysexual porn cinema and a very dark backroom. What happened in there shall remain a secret!
 
Why is it time to bring back electroclash?
 
Scottee and I had spoken a year ago about creating a retroclash party and the move to Superstore now seemed like the perfect opportunity to try it out. We want to shake things up a bit and create something uplifting in the upstairs bar but experiment with an alternative to the pop/commercial rooms at a lot of parties nowadays. Electroclash is definitely fun and it embraces the performance and DIY aesthetic we’ve always encouraged at SOS.
 
The plan is to kick the night off with some older electroclash faves and then mix it up with newer experimental dance music later on. Put Peaches next to Zebra Katz and there’s something that holds them together. Ultimately, we’re going to play around with it, aim to keep it exciting, and have some fun. For those that want a deeper, housier vibe we’ve always got the basement.
 
What’s a quintessential SOS track?
 
It’s hard to pick one out. Ima Read by Zebra Katz holds a special place after their performance at SOS last year. It’s one of those tracks that will work in the housey sets downstairs and the experimental sets upstairs.
 

 
Piepke, the artist behind your flyers, has done a brilliant job for this latest one. What’s the thought behind the design?
 
Working with Piepke is amazing. We seem to share a similar tongue-in-cheek humour and imagination. He’s such a talented artist and always manages to translate any brief whilst completely putting his own spin on it. I think this month’s design perfectly captures our excitement about going to Superstore. The gold bomber jacket is a nod to the addition of the Electroclash room at SOS. What we need now is somebody to actually make us that pimped up trolley so we can hotrod down Kingsland High Street haha.
 
SOS at Dalston Superstore
 
What’s your fave track or hidden gem we can hear on your latest mix?
 
DollarInMaPocket by Donewrong is fantastic. It’s about to come out on Hannah Holland and Deboa’s Native City label and is already getting a great response when I play it out.
 
 
 
And finally, what can we expect from the first few SOS parties here at Dalston Superstore?
 
Save Our Souls record label is about to launch in April so we’ll definitely be incorporating those fresh-off-the-press artists with performances, and DJ sets etc.  Overall, you can expect a diverse crowd, fresh ideas, and some seriously good new music played by the freshest newbies on the block and veteran old dogs, like me. 

Join Jim for the very first SOS here at Dalston Superstore on Saturday 2nd March from 9pm – 4:30am.

Superstore Recommends: The Carry Nation

Batty Bass boss Hannah Holland has just sent us the latest offering from the label from New York’s The Carry Nation. With remix offerings from herself, Luke Howard & Severino and Al B, we just know it’s going to get a lot of love within these four walls. Have a listen and check out the official word from Hannah below…

The Batty Bass New York Series showcases some of the legendary talent that serves the city’s underground house scene, ‘This Bitch Is Alive’, as The Carry Nation’s debut tune announced. These artists and tracks are to be heard in secret loft spaces, where voguers carry on and on til sunrise and beyond. 

Who lives in a House Like This? New York’s finest… DJ Nita & Will Automagic. They are nothing other than legendary expert DJs and dancefloor magicians , their potent combination as The Carry Nation has literally created dancefloor gold dust. Debuting the incredible ‘This Bitch Is Alive ft. Viva Ruiz’, they carry on to their 2nd release with Batty Bass, ‘House Like This’. Bouncy basslines, congas and a groove that penetrates the dancer to make them werk the floor and ignite the party. ‘Oh it was wonderful, Build your house of the future, House like this’ announces the vocal, giving us The Carry Nation’s own slice of future New York house.

Label boss Hannah Holland’s House Like This remix serves up touches of acid thunder, a pokey baseline and magnetic snare rolls, building the house with an element of UK old skool for a late night deep affair. 

London legends, Luke Howard & Severino (half of Horse Meat Disco) have expertly taken This Bitch is Alive into a techy hypnotic bitch of an alive remix. Late night strings, rims, claps and snares march the dancefloor deep into the night. 

Al B’s New York flavour for ‘This Bitch Is Alive’ takes us back to the era of Sound Factory with a full on tribal werk out. Al B made this mix back last year and the response on the dancefloor has been nuts , particularly from NYC’s runway ballroom scene kids. It would only be right to spread the love to all the floors! 

For more Batty Bass releases visit: www.beatport.com/label/batty-bass/12924