Posts Tagged ‘lesbian’

Fèmmme Fraîche second birthday!

We can’t believe it’s been two whole years since East London’s hottest lez fest Fèmmme Fraîche first sauntered through our doorway with a flick of her hair and a twinkle in her eye! She’s now racked up 12 riotous ladies nights at the mothership, with the likes of Honey Dijon, DJ Heather and Joyce Muniz at the helm. To ring in this very special occasion, promoters Michelle Manetti and Sandra Le have planned a whole night of  giveaways a-plenty, goodie bags up for grabs for our party-goers and cute AF merchandise with their resident DJs running riot the whole night long! We caught up with the girls to reflect, reminisce, and get excited for this Saturday’s birthday bash!

Hey Michelle and Sandra! Happy birthday to your baby Fèmmme Fraîche! How have the last two years of parties been for you?

SL: Thank you, guys! I can’t believe it’s been two years already! The last two years of parties have been… exhausting! Haha, no seriously though, we’ve had so, so much fun. We’ve met incredible artists, and working with the DSS crew is a real delight.

MM: Yep, it’s been a wonderful whirlwind of deliciousness, all pleasure no pain (except the day after each party, which always feels a little delicate!)

If you had to pick one song to represent Fèmmme Fraîche, what would it be?

SL: I’d say U & Me Electricity from Kim Ann Foxman, it’s my favourite track at the moment! It brings me back to my youth, it’s classic, it’s catchy and it’s acidy! Kim Ann is one of our favourite DJs and a good peep, so hard not to go with that one.

MM: For me, I’m gonna say Skwerl – All Woman (K2’s Deepah 1ne Dub). The track is 10 years old now, and I love dipping into my old skool tunes for FF, it’s bouncy as hell, ravey and as the title says, it’s all woman, just like Fèmmme Fraîche!

What has been your highlight of the last two years?

SL: That’s a tough one. Each night has its own flavour and all our headliners have been phenomenal. If I had to pick one though I’d have to say our night with Honey Dijon was pure madness! 

MM: Yep, I have to agree. They’ve all been amazing, but the Honey Dijon party had some crazy electricity, so much energy and love that night, even the walls were dripping with sweat, it was such a crazy, sexy, cool party!

femmme fraiche at dalston superstore

Why do you think it’s important to foster spaces for queer women to party?

SL: Well, it may sound cliché but there aren’t many places anymore where queer women can meet other queer women, play, and have fun whilst feeling they can do so safely. So, yes, it is important to foster these safe spaces and cater for a diverse crowd of queers with all sort of tastes.

MM: Exactly, it’s so important we nurture these safe spaces and continue to provide places, and parties where girls can go out, feel comfortable and confident that they won’t feel discriminated or objectified unwillingly so they can concentrate on just having fun and enjoying their night.

What does your queer utopia look like?

SL: Ultimately a world where nobody gives a fuck about who you are, how you identify or who you love.

MM: Second that!

FF007 b

Can you tell us a bit about what to expect at your birthday party?

The finest Fèmmme Fraîchetastic music, sexy dance moves, general sexiness, sweat and big smiles all round! And of course as, we’re celebrating our second birthday, there’ll be decorations, party poppers and fun things… plus we have some goodies to giveaway – we’re giving two lucky winners  free entry for them and their pal, free drinks on entry, free merch and two £20 vouchers for Sh! Women’s Erotic Emporium. Enter here! Are you excited yet? we are!!!!

Who are some of your favourite DJs and producers at the moment?

SL: All the DJs we booked in the past two years, our homies, and right now, Peggy Gou!

MM: Yeah, all our headliners have been booked pretty much because they’re our faves, but also The Black Madonna, Tama Sumo, Steffi, Virginia, Heidi, Helena Hauff deserve special shouts for being fabulous DJs and repping the girls.

If you could change anything about London’s LGBT nightlife, what would it be?

SL: We need more of it, and more diversity.

We’ve heard whispers that you have some exciting things in the pipeline for Fèmmme Fraîche in 2018! Can you let us in on any plans?

We’re growing Fèmmme Fraîche into something more than just a club night, continuing to support female, female-identifying and non binary DJs and throwing damn fun Fèmmme Fraîche parties, but just adding some extra dimensions and extra features for it to become a little more interactive. Our plan is to create a platform and a space where queer women can showcase their creative skills across numerous artistic disciplines, as well as offering opportunities to learn new skills. We’ve got some fun stuff up our sleeves, so stay tuned!

And finally, what are you planning to unleash on the laser basement at your birthday party?

SL:  The demons of house music!

MM: Yep definitely the beasts with the dirtiest, filthiest basement beats. We want bras spinning, booty shakin’ and hand’s-in-the-air action!

Catch Michelle Manetti and Sandra Le at the Fèmmme Fraîche Second Birthday Bash, this Saturday 11 November at Dalston Superstore!


Dalston Superstore is absolutely thrilled to announce new weekly gurlzzz party Goldsnap will be debuting on Thursday 31 March! The three-way lovechild of local female DJ collective Goldsnap, this is a party space for all with an emphasis on showcasing amazing local female talent. You can expect R&B, Hip Hop, House, Trap, Afrobeats, Garage, Dance, House and more from Mwen, DJ Dibs, VDubs & very special guests! We caught up with them to see what they’re planning to unleash!

Hi guys! We are super excited about your new new Thursday night girls night at Dalton Superstore! Can you tell us a little bit about your vision for Goldsnap?

We feel it’s time for something new to happen on the scene. A place where girls can go every Thursday to dance till they sweat, with other girls. It’s pretty simple. That’s all I’ve ever wanted from a girl’s night – good music, good vibes and dancing.

Where did the inspiration for the name come from?

Goldsnap means a sudden climatic change that is golden. 
Goldsnap poster Final 3
You guys have a bit of a history together as DJs. How did the three of you come together?

We all met through VDubz back in 2014. VDubz was bartending in a basement joint in Dalston and DJ Dibs played a set that basically blew her away. So VDubz fed her rum and coke until DJ Dibs was convinced to come over and do a jam session. VDubz brought Mwen along and it was so electric that VDubz’s house burned down a couple weeks later. True story.

If you could change anything about queer nightlife in London, what would it be?

If anything, it would be more QTIBPOC (Queer, Trans*, Inter*, Black and People of Colour) spaces. We want a night which plays something for everyone, we’re setting out to create a space where everything comes together, the music, the queer, the funk & the fun.

If you had a time machine and could do dancing anywhere/ anywhen, where would you go?

Dj Dibs: Definitely back to the 70s when no one gave a shit. Music was at its peak, everyone had to dance and hairy guys were in – lol.

Mwen: Any time a new scene emerged like hip-hop or jungle/drum ‘n’ bass. I remember when dubstep was emerging. Those early moments in a scene when a few artists are doing something really interesting and exciting I think are golden. Working outside the paradigm of popular music is such a hard thing to do and I think there is something magical when you witness it happening.

VDubz: Back to the Golden Age of hip hop: the nineties. The style was everything, the lyrics were on point – Fresh Prince, A Tribe Called Quest, VH1, MTV… I find it all terribly romantic.

What is your favourite track of the year so far?

Dibs: Am I Wrong by Anderson Paak. It’s a party track but also soothing at the same time.

Mwen: Missy Elliot’s WTF. I’ll be playing that tune a lot I think…

VDubz: Beyonce’s Formation. We slay!

And one track you can’t wait to drop at Goldsnap?

Dibs: Afrikan Lady by Aina More

Mwen: I can’t wait to drop a few garage classics…you’ll have to wait and find out which ones though…

VDubz: Rewind by Kelela

Catch the Dibs, VDubz & Mwen at the premiere of Goldsnap on Thursday 31 March at Dalston Superstore from 9pm-2:30am!

Bica & Cathal

London’s premiere Thursday night social for thirsty lesbians and their gay boyfriends Clam Jam turns ONE YEAR OLD this week! And to celebrate, we rounded up resident DJs Bica and Packin C aka Cathal to find out how they keep managing to attract the hottest girls, interesting guests (this week as a birthday treat, Pat Butcher- ok Jacqui Potato dressed as Pat Butcher- takes to the decks) and still manage to play good music…

“Clam jam” is the female equivalent of cock blocking. But isn’t what you guys are doing basically the opposite?

bICA: We called it that because it was one of our favourite lesbian slang expressions.

cATHAL: We wanted to turn it on its head – claim the expression for ourselves and bring a bit of humour to it. Plus I mean, come on, if you’re getting clam jammed it means there are some serious fitties in the room.

bICA: Yeah, who doesn’t like some hot and healthy competition?!

Before you settled on the obviously amazing name, what else hilarious was up for consideration?

bICA: Anything that had pUSSY cat or female genitalia was obviously considered.

cATHAL: mINGE bINGE was tossed around and is still in the running.

bICA: Yeah, we’re still considering using it as an after cLAM jAM party should the occasion arise.

Why do lesbians like dancing on Thursdays?

bICA: It’s weird innit because we presume the majority are employed and still have to get up on Fridays!

cATHAL: From the outset we thought if it’s a good party the ladies will come regardless of what day it is – Thursday just seems to fill their slot.

What’s a guaranteed Packin’ C dancefloor filler?

cATHAL: Anything sleazeh and chunkeh.

bICA: With a Jäger bomb bass line and a healthy amount of pheromones sprinkled across it.

cATHAL: This Toddler T track with Shola Ama is a favourite  – it’s a bit of a Clam Jam anthem now – it ALWAYS gets the girls dancing, if you hear it you know you’re here and the fun is gonna increase ten fold.

Fave photo each snapped by Cathal that sums up the night for you…


Cathal's Clam Jam pic


Bica's Clam Jam pic

Forget “what happens at Clam Jam, stays at Clam Jam”, what is the craziest thing you have seen with your own eyes at Clam Jam?

bICA: Girls getting it on in the most unusual crevices of Superstore, naked dancing on the bar…

cATHAL: I’ve got a vivid memory of these really hot girls packed into a gold BMW outside doing their nails getting ready to come in – that gave a happy warm feeling inside.

Who is your dream Clam Jam guest?

cATHAL: Aside from Pat Butcher?

bICA: I’d have to say Courtney Love on one on the decks.

cATHAL: Beth Ditto dressed as Lil’Kim holding hands with Sandra Bernhard would be nice.

If Clam Jam was a cocktail what would the ingredients be?


7oz crushed ice

500ml Hendricks gin (strong as fuck, gets you unawares)

A large unused (please girls) slice of cucumber

Lucy Fizz tonic (for the ting)

A big red sugary rim 

NB: it’s paramount not to be stingy with the measures.

All of this is guaranteed to leave you with no regrets, just a fuzzy clammy feeling of joy.

What would you improve about London’s lesbian scene?

cATHAL: Consistency.

bICA: There simply should be more to it.

cATHAL: Yep, I think people being more aware that there are a whole bunch of girls out there who are pretty next level and wanna go out somewhere together.

bICA: Definitely… sometimes a factor that is  missing from lesbian nights is a good directional music policy.

What’s the ratio of girls to boys on a standard Thursday?

bICA: I think I would say 85% girls, 10% fit gay boys, 5% drag queens, 0% straight pervy boys hassling ya.

What can we expect from Clam Jam Year Two?

cATHAL: We have a really exciting warehouse collaboration coming up – still under wraps, I can’t wait , our girls are going to LOVE IT.

bICA: We’ve had some really great girl guests in our first year – we wanna continue bringing a diverse element to the east end – if I tell you more I’m gonna have to kill ya.

cATHAL: Our website is launching next week so keep ya clams peeled! It’s going to be a great showcase of all the photos I’ve taken over the past year as well as the posters we’ve created with Shay Malt – he has been brilliant. We want to continue pushing a strong visual identity for cLAM jAM and most importantly, continue in making a difference.

bICA: We wanna thank our fiercely loyal girls by making the night even more bam! 

What advice would you give to a Clam Jam virgin?

bICA: Brush your hair, change your underwear, do some pelvic floor exercises.

cATHAL: Bring a jar, we provide the jam.

Join Bica, Cathal and Pat Butcher (aka Jacqui Potato) this Thursday 4th September from 9pm – 2.30am at Clam Jam’s 1st Birthday.

Jennifer Cardini

Hailing from the south of France, Jennifer Cardini forged her reputation with residencies at Rex Club and famed lesbian club Le Pulp, ultimately going on to set up her successful Correspondant label to release both her own records and fresh new ones from around the world. Ahead of the party we caught up with her to talk about techno, love and Parisian lesbians…

What drew you to Paris in the late ’90s?

Friendship did. I met a girl who was also a DJ called Sex Toy during a radio interview I did for the release of my first ever record. After the interview we started to talk and became good friends. We started a band called Pussy Killers, which was one of the first DJ combo bands. We wanted to do something a bit different. Being fans of David Bowie and Rocky Horror Picture Show, we wanted to bring this rock-glam-humour into techno, because at this moment everyone was so serious, wearing label tshirts and stuff like that. So we started this and we wore Mexican wrestler masks, arriving on stage with a big ghetto blaster that played recordings of my dog barking, and playing Nirvana, AC/DC or Iron Maiden in the middle of our DJ set. It was a mixture of everything we grew up with, that superhero attitude.

She was the one who introduced me to the people from Le Pulp. I played there and they asked me to become a resident. So I said yes and just moved. Also Sex Toy and I wanted to make music together so it made more sense to be in Paris… I’m from the south of France and it’s not the most exciting region when you are young! It’s very nice now that I am a bit older- to go to the beach and stuff- but when I was in my 20s I was bored to death there.

So I came to Paris, which was really amazing, it was super exciting, so many things to do and people to know. So friendship brought me [to Paris]. But actually, I was already playing Rex Club and when I told them I planned on moving they offered me a residency. It was difficult to say no. I came here already having the two residencies, and for me they were the two best clubs at the time in Paris.

DJ Sex Toy was quite an influence presence in Paris?

She was an icon. Now there are two movies about her as she passed away 10-12 years ago. She was the kind of person who had 10 ideas every second… which could be very tiring! But she had this amazing energy and very creative. She had the craziness that I was too shy to have at that time. So we were a good combo- I was the more serious techno-freak and she was more the crazy creative person. She was always able to find crazy clothes to wear and be avant-garde-everything. Anything she wore, everyone else at Le Pulp would start wearing as well. She was this model for a lot of lesbians.

DJ Sex Toy

You were name-checked in RA’s article “The Alternate History Of Sexuality In Clubbing” as one of the most prominent DJs to come out of the Parisian lesbian club scene- other than Sex Toy, who were YOUR favourite DJs from that time?

Well, Ivan [Smagghe] was for sure. He was resident at the Kill The DJ’s parties. And Chloé of course.

Umm Le Pulp was really nice because it was small and dirty and crappy with the worst sound system ever! But we got everyone to play there, y’know. And it was also the time that everyone started touring outside of their own country and all the German DJs were really into the idea of coming to Paris to play and everybody was sleeping at our place, and we’d cook for them because we had absolutely no budget whatsoever. Which meant I got the chance to see a lot of amazing DJs play at Pulp. For example Michael Mayer, and we got to play back to back at this time. He is for sure one of my favourite DJs as he is a real storyteller. Just like Koze. He was another favourite DJ of mine at this time. I remember we booked him for Nouveau Casino and he started his set with Johnny Cash and it was just fantastic.

Even now, Koze, Michael Mayer, Ivan… and Andrew Weatherall are amongst my favourite DJs. Also I really love Ata from Robert Johnson. Because these DJs can take you everywhere.

Roman Flügel is another I like a lot as he is always on the verge of experimental and dance so it’s always very interesting and with a lot of elegance. Roman is a very elegant DJ for me. Very smart in his choices and how he builds things up.

What made that time in Paris so special that people still want to talk about it today?

Probably the fact that a lot of DJs came out of that time, Ivan and Chloé and me, we all started there. And also the fact that it was a lesbian club! That was pretty unconventional because the nightlife was ruled by the techno clubs or by huge gay parties. At the time Le Pulp started there was no place for queer subculture. Gays had gone really mainstream in the big clubs where you had thousands of boys dancing to commercial house music. So what made it special is that it was the place of a “first time” for a lot of people.

Le Pulp 

It was also a bit punk and a bit dirty. We just did whatever we wanted in there. There was no dress code. The entrance was free. And it was a lesbian club where boys were allowed if they behaved well. They would come with girls and everybody was really respectful. There were no social differences. You had hipsters. And you also had homeless people and from the suburbs.

Homeless people?

Yeah. I read an interview with Ivan and I remembered that sometimes when it was really cold we would let people from the street get in the club so they wouldn’t freeze to death. It was really like this err…


Yeah! And that’s something that has tended to disappear a little bit with the high fees that are charged for entrance. It leaves a lot of people outside y’know.

It was more mixed. Sometimes you had people from everywhere. We had Björk coming and people staring at her like she was an alien.

Do you think that women, queer or otherwise, in techno prefer to play at queer parties or venues?

I don’t know. I mean for me, I really like to play at lesbian parties! I know that promoters like Barbi(e) Turrix for example, which is the main lesbian party at the moment, they really like to book female artists. But I think it’s also very political. It’s a response to the fact that a lot of the festivals don’t book women sometimes. You can see lineups with no women at all! It’s like ‘ey!

But I don’t know. I can’t answer. I like to play good parties.

But you also play gay parties for guys as well as for girls, no?

I try to choose parties more according to the venue and the promoter. If I can see that the guy or the girl  making the party really loves music and is passionate, and you feel that by looking at the poster, you can see easily what the target is. If the target is “okay I am gonna make a lot of money” or the target is “okay I am gonna make money because obviously you are working for it, but on the human point I want the party to be great with a nice atmosphere”. You can feel this.

Jennifer Cardini – “Venom” (Official Video) by CorrespondantRecords

Your label Correspondant has been going from strength to strength- what should we be looking out for on it?

Actually right now I have a little fetish with the Mexican scene haha! We are gonna release records from a guy called Max Jones in September.

And you have Zombies in Miami too…

Yeah. The Mexican scene is extremely rich, very good producers who have one foot in more like rock music and one foot in raw dance music… and there is also a kind of humour to the music. It’s very heavy. And very sexy. I really like that.

But people that don’t know the label should listen to the compilations. They’re good snapshots of what we like to do. The diversity and range we like to go through. From techno to down-tempo stuff.

One of the best tracks from the last compilation is The Aspodells [Andrew Weatherall and Timothy J Fairplay]. It’s so beautiful. I would recommend that and also the fantastic André Bratten called Trommer og Bass. I still play it and have been for one year now. It’s a huge track. It’s gonna be on Erol Alkan’s Fabric CD.

Your own latest EP with Shaw references Paris Is Burning with tracks In The Ballroom and Pepper LaBeija- why do you think the documentary is still such a rich source material after all these years?

Because it’s still very modern, very relevant, it’s still very hard for a lot of gay kids to live their sexuality with freedom. For example, in the movie you see that kids were thrown out from their house, and rejected by their family. I think it is even Pepper LaBeija who says that when his mom found out he was wearing women’s clothing, she burned all of them.

Pepper LaBeija

We live in big cities and we don’t always realise all this, because we are in a social environment that makes us think that it’s easy to be gay, but I don’t think it is. I don’t believe that it’s like that for a kid that lives in a little city- he still gets the finger pointed at him. Even if we make progress it’s still not so easy to grow up knowing you are gay and to be happy with it.

I saw the film for the first time two years ago, just before going into the studio with David [Shaw]. I’d heard about the movie, but I’d never watched it, and my girlfriend showed it to me and I was really moved by those kids.

The film is also really relevant of the difficulties of going from one social class to another. In the movie some of the kids are dressing up like upper-middle-class or trailer or one is even dressing like an airline pilot. So you really have this feeling that by dressing up and by going to those ballrooms they are trying to climb a social ladder that in reality would be much harder for them to climb. With their background from living on the streets, it’s much harder for them to break the social differences. This moved me because I think it’s still the case. It’s still very hard to go from one social level to another.

What keeps you in Cologne?

This one is easy! Love does. I’ve lived here with my girlfriend for the last three years. I wanted to change my life a little bit. I’ve got 20 years of nightlife behind me and I just wanted to start the label and start to make music again. I’ve had this project with David [Shaw] and I’m travelling so much I just wanted to find a place that was a little bit more stress-free and laid back than Paris. Paris can be really tough! It’s still my favourite city and I’m totally in love with it. It’s so beautiful and every time I go there I’m like “wow”. But I wouldn’t like to live there anymore. I do miss my friends though.

Jennifer Cardini

The quality of life here [in Cologne], and the quietness in the week are really part of my stability right now and that’s something I don’t want to break.

What are your friends in Paris doing? What exciting projects, nights, things you wish you were part of?

I’m still friends with all the people from Le Pulp. That’s nearly 20 years of friendship.

And I do miss the queer scene in Paris! The queer scene in Cologne is very underground haha, I haven’t really found it yet! But in Paris it’s really good right now. Without pretention, I can really feel how much my generation gave more freedom to the new lesbian generation. Because we broke free from something.

We were like “’ey! We are here!” Before Le Pulp, I have the feeling the lesbian scene was very underground in Paris. Like, it was always very confidential.

I can feel it now with big parties like Barbi(e) Turrix where you have like 1000 girls dancing to really underground techno music and that is just amazing. And that is because of Pulp. And this is still something unique. Everywhere I go there is rarely 1000 women dancing.

To good music?

I am not gonna say “this is good music” or “this is bad music”. But, they are dancing. To music that we play. And that’s quite crazy for the lesbian scene! And that is really because of Pulp. And of us fighting to not become mainstream and keep our craziness a little bit.


And what do you plan to treat our basement for lesbians and their gay boyfriends to?

Ahhh, I don’t know! I’m still thinking about it! But I like to play all kinds of stuff so I’ll chose records, and then I’m there, and we see how it goes. It’s like a deal y’know, the energy I get from them and the energy I get back. It’s like going on a trip. All I can do is bring good music and then we see what we do about it. 

Join Jennifer Cardini this Friday 11th December from 9pm – 3am for Lazertitz at Dalston Superstore.

Muff Magazine

Ahead of the launch party tomorrow night for Muff, the London based queer print magazine, we caught up with the two ladies behind the publication to find out a bit more about what’s in the latest issue and why they do what they do…
Muff Magazine came to global acclaim with its moving photo series of lesbian couples living in Russia, together despite the difficult circumstances. What led you to commission this and were you surprised by the attention it received?
Bukanova: I wouldn’t have dreamed of the story going viral! With muff we want to change the way lesbians are represented in today’s media and challenge out of date stereotypes. Therefore I wanted to portrait couples in the intimate environment of their own home, showing that they chop onions, watch TV  and do everything a straight couple would do. Originally from Russia myself, I’m very touched and upset about its anti-gay propaganda and the consequences, which I think can improve if gay becomes – and remains – more visible. It might be hard to accept the unfamiliar, but having to deal with it on a daily basis will hopefully, one day, make it the accepted and normal thing it is.
KateBukanova struck up a friendship with the photographer Anastasia Ivanova while she was in London and basically the next thing I knew they’d created a photo series together. After that, all I had to do was bring the photos to life with a few words from the subjects themselves. As soon as the Huffington Post and BuzzFeed took it, our inboxes just went crazy. I still can’t believe how far that piece travelled – it really made an impact. Even now, over six months later, I still come across the most unlikeliest of people who want to talk about that photo series.
Now that the spotlight is for the most part off Russia’s treatment of LGBT people, do you think this is something you hope to highlight again in the future? Perhaps revisiting the same couples?
Bukanova: Maybe. We are very grateful to have the couples and thank them for standing up despite the fact that a majority tries to silence them. I think, for now, we made our point. 
Kate: Perhaps in a few years when things have hopefully changed – but not for now. I think we made a really strong point with the piece and I wouldn’t want to dilute its message by banging the drum too much. Anyway, the whole point of muff is that we try not to overly politicise issues, particularly negative ones. In the new issue, we have a different photo series, still based around people but this time about those who moved to Berlin and why. It’s a really beautiful, emotional piece which hopefully has a more positive vibe.
You’ve stated the next issue of Muff Magazine is a bit less political… why did you choose Lovecats as a theme?
Bukanova: Because everything isn’t that serious. And we love cats, of course. 
KateMainly because Bukanova and Piczo shot a beautiful fashion editorial with her favourite, sphinx cats. But, yes, also because we wanted more of a lighthearted, upbeat feel to this issue – and creatively we felt a lot more confident to express that this time, both in the content and design. 
Why did you both choose to champion print as a medium? 
Bukanova: Form follows content, and muff isn’t a trend-led magazine. It is illustrating stories, picturing the life of individuals and reflecting on issues in our society – I think this is a beautiful thing to last. 
Kate: Because print is beautiful – you can savour and share magazines in a way that you just can’t with the immediacy of the web. Things like content, photography and texture shape a really strong statement and I think muff really deserved that kind of medium. You know, you can make a really great website and it can have the biggest audience in the world, but it will never endure like print and one day, who knows whether that website will still be online? Financially, of course, it’s not that simple… 
Muff Magazine seeks to redefine “lesbian”  through an exploration of queer culture- what would say exemplifies that ethos in the latest issue?
BukanovaThe deliberate choice to avoid stereotypes. Not because of personal taste, but more the will to challenge existing perceptions.
KateWe try to explore queer issues and creatives without focusing on sexuality – because it doesn’t really matter whether somebody is gay or not. In the latest issue, we look at creatives who have moved to Berlin. I can tell you now that some of them happen to be gay, but at no point do we feel the need to mention that or define their work through it. We also have a couple of amazing interviews, with people like Jake Arnott and Molly Nilsson, as well as our own take on the famous Barilla pasta controversy. Virginia Woolf makes an appearance too. 
What are your personal favourite pieces of enduring queer literature or art?
BukanovaI never thought of literature or art to be solely queer.
What would you improve or change about London’s LGBT scene?
KateWhen I was young and single I loved London’s gay scene. From what I remember, I have to say it’s one of the best in the world – there’s something for everyone. Nowadays I don’t tend to frequent it so much and if I find myself in a gay bar it’s unlikely I’m in there solely because it’s gay. Maybe I’d change the beer selection…
Who are the Muff Magazine icons (and why)?
BukanovaFellow independent publishers like The Gourmand and Buffalo Zine.
KateI come to muff from a slightly more serious, editorial background so for me, my personal icons are people like Glenn Greenwald, George Monbiot, Naomi Klein. Muff-wise, I’d say we took a lot of hope and inspiration from magazines like BUTT and Girls Like Us. 
What’s your favourite feature each in the new issue?
BukanovaThe cats, gay pasta, our still life follow-up that can be seen here, a visual diary of past crushes, and our collaboration with Berlin based creatives. Did I mention cats?
KateI’d say it’s a toss up between Partner Look, which is our response to the Barilla pasta affair that we came up with over the kitchen table one rainy afternoon, and the Berlin photo series. 
As this is an interview for Dalston Superstore and we are all about dancefloors… if you had a time machine and could go back in time to any dancefloor anywhen/anywhere where would you want to go?
BukanovaIn the ’80s, somewhere between a gig of the Russian band Kino, Klaus Nomi – or  just dancing to Pet Shop Boys, Grace Jones & co, wearing tons of make-up, studded over knee boots and über-oversized jumpers.
Kate: 1920’s swing? I basically spent my entire childhood wishing I’d been in the Bloomsbury Group. 
Muff Launch
For more info on the launch of issue 2 of Muff Magazine tomorrow night visit their Facebook page.

International Day Against Homophobia And Transphobia

As today is International Day Against Homophobia And Transphobia we thought we’d share our favourite recent LBGT videos, images and links from around the internet…

Alan Turing Sculpture

WWII codebreaker and tragic gay computing pioneer Alan Turing has been chosen as a “local hero” of Paddington and commemorated in this 2D sculpture.

Via Pink News

This is the moving story of 11 year old Caine from Texas who was bullied badly at school because of his lesbian mums. He fought back by giving this speech to his school board.

Via Upworthy

This eloquent monologue comes from a young boy in Singapore who addresses his homophobic bullies directly in an incredibly mature manner. 

Via All Out

Meanwhile, over in France, this heartening clip shows a waitress stand on a table to announce she’s a lesbian who can finally marry. The diners applause is what makes this video so amazing.

Via Buzzfeed 

Finally, over on Autostraddle, one trans woman writes about how there is no right or wrong way to be trans in I’m A Trans Woman And I’m Not Interested In Being One Of The “Good Ones”.

Via Reddit

Main image: The I-35 Bridge in Minneapolis lit up in rainbow colours to support same-sex marriage via Buzzfeed.


Dyke Of Our Time








Tania Olive’s Dyke Of Our Time explores female gender through sexuality. Olive’s series comprises of deadpan portraits of lesbians shot within their own homes. The series aims to show the fluidity of gender within the lesbian community and challenge people’s often antiquated ideas of stereotypes. The intimacy of each individual’s own domestic space is juxtaposed against the direct and uniformed pose, allowing for each woman’s diversity and individuality to be compared.

Tania olive originates from Portsmouth but grew up in Germany due to her father’s position in the army. She then moved to London and has lived here for 13 years. Over this time she attended City University and completed a degree in BSc Nursing (hons). She was a sister in Paediatric A&E for 10 years. 

Having always had a passion for photography Olive decided to do a part time degree in 2008 at Westminster University alongside working as a nurse and finished in the summer of 2012 with a BA in photography. 

Her graduate show was part of the Free Range exhibition at the Truman Brewery last summer where she was awarded best in show by the British Journal of Photography (BJP) for her series Dyke Of Our Time. 

This body of work is an ongoing project which has nearly doubled in size, and Olive would like to double this again still. The Dyke Of Our Time series was recently featured in the February issue of DIVA magazine

After graduating Olive has started assisting to gain more understanding and confidence of working in a studio and still nurses on an agency basis. 

For more information: