Posts Tagged ‘queer’

Jacob Meehan

This Friday our favourite loose cannon PATSY invites you to her Third Birthday! Headlining this glitzy affair is the absolutely fabulous Jacob Meehan! 

A thoughtful DJ and passionate organiser of functions, Jacob Meehan has played everywhere from Smart Bar (Chicago) to Panorama Bar (Berlin), worked behind the counter at Chicago’s legendary Gramophone Records, and now roams about:://blank for 48+ hours straight each month when Buttons, the party where he’s both resident and program director, delights all of queer Berlin.  

Ahead of his hotly anticipated set at PATSY, resident DJ and booker Whitney Weiss caught up with Jacob to talk about summer songs, anti-fascist protests, and floating music festivals.  

 

 

Hey Jacob! You’re a resident DJ and program director at Buttons, a great monthly party that combines creative artist bookings and queer debauchery in Berlin. What is a song that embodies the energy of Buttons for you?? 

 Hyper Go Go’s High Cloud 9 Mix

 

Before Berlin, you lived in New York and in Chicago, where you did the Men’s Room parties and were a resident at Smart Bar. What record makes you think of your time in Chicago?

RIS – Love-n-Music.

 I’ve heard you play everything from house to freestyle to ambient sunrise music to techno. What would you say is the most surprising or unexpected record in your collection?? 

This track from Mr. Bungle’s California album has been stuck in my head, which harkens back to my teenage days as a closeted, stoned, angsty Midwestern nu-metalhead. 

This is your second time at Superstore (thanks for your set at Les Poppeurs a few years ago!) What is a song you’re looking forward to playing late night in the laser basement?? 

I’ve got lots of fresh stuff from friends and colleagues from all over the globe, which I love being able to share. My former co-worker at Gramaphone Records, Ike Release, just gave me some lush unreleased material, and Will and Nita from The Carry Nation inboxed me a great new vocal house track. Plus new cuts from Buttons residents Shingo Suwa & Stanley Schmidt.  

Berlin has been blessed with a lot of sunlight this April and May. What record is your favorite to listen to at home when the windows are open, a breeze is wafting in, and you’re relaxing?? 

Alice Coltrane Featuring Pharoah Sanders – Journey In Satchidananda.

What’s a song you wish you had written?  

Have you heard the latest track by John Roberts? I deeply admire everything that he does.

 Do you write music ever, and if so, what’s it like?? 

I just uploaded a few house tracks to my Soundcloud, which I made with Garrett David ( Smart Bar/Lobster Theremin).

Recently you participated in what looked like a beautiful and successful protest against the far right AfD (Alternativ für Deutschland) in Berlin where the music community outnumbered the fascists. I saw that you were DJing at one point. What sort of songs did you play, and what was the day like?  

Clubbing is one of Berlin’s biggest industries, so to see the scene self-actualise and come together to politically organise against the far right was beyond powerful and necessary. 70,000+ people showed up in the streets to stand up to the AfD, and show them that they are not the majority. The day was a beautifully colourful, peaceful, multi-generational protest soundtracked by a number of trucks rigged with sound systems. Buttons collaborated on the QUEER BLOCK with RiotPornceptualHerrensaunaGegen, Cocktail d’Amore, MembersGDay, and Room4Resistance. It was honestly one of the most important things I’ve ever been a part of, and it was such an honour to be able to play for an hour. My personal highlight was getting to drop Robert Owen’s 1987 classic Bring Down the Walls just a stone’s throw from where the Berlin Wall used to be. 

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 You’re one of the organisers of Whole Festival, which is bringing together Buttons, Discwoman, Unter, Horse Meat, Cocktail d’Amore, and more on a peninsula at Greimminer See. What’s a record you know you’ll want to play there, surrounded by friends and community?? 

I think I’m slated to play before Eris Drew on Saturday night before the sun sets. Our stage will be floating in a lake, which is a former quarry, now flooded. I anticipate soundtracking the transition from light into dark, probably through Bezier – B2 Teleconférence. 

What was the first record you ever bought? Where did you buy it?

Babe, we’re gonna love tonight by Lime from Gramaphone and Try Again by Aaliyah off Ebay.

 

What song have you always wanted to hear someone else play out so you could dance to it?

All Night Passion by Alisha!


Catch Jacob Meehan at PATSY, Friday 15th June from 9pm – 3am at Dalston Superstore!

LOFT

This Friday sees the first instalment of MEGALAST, our brand new extravaganza from J. Aria + Ni-Ku! Expect extreme bass, acidic explorations and alien club music. Headlining this experimental, abrasive, uncompromising and trip-inducing experience is LOFT (Astral Plane)!

Following their first release in 2016, the queer Mancunian producer has been quickly making waves. With their mixes encompassing rave birthed drum programming, experimental electronics and kylie edits, their style is renowned for its uniqueness.  Having featured in both Crack Magazine and Mixmag, as well as an EP with the label Wisdom Teeth and contributions to the Astral Plane compilation, LOFT is trailblazing the experimental music scene. More recently, LOFT was given the ultimate seal of approval: Björk selected their track Funemployed alongside the most innovative artists in the game, including Arca and Kelela, in her Mixmag cover mix

We caught up with the experimental producer to chat about their performative DJ sets, their experience of being visibly queer in the nightlife scene and what we can expect from Friday!

 


 

 

Oh hey LOFT, we are SO excited to have you at Dalston Superstore! If our readers aren’t acquainted, can you tell us a little bit about you?

Hello hi friends , I am Joeli and I do the LOFT thing. I’ve been doing it since I was about 14. I make stuff that has the privilege of Wisdom Teeth and Astral Plane Recordings’ love, support and distribution networks.

You’ve been making music since you were 14?! That is quite awhile! Do you have any highlights to your DJ career so far?

Playing in a pub in Lancaster for the drummer of my dad’s best friend’s new krautrock excursion ; playing at a club in Athens where people don’t show up until 2AM at the earliest ; playing in the home HQ safe haven that is The White Hotel on numerous occasions with only the best lineups.

 

loft101010

You must have been introduced to some talented DJs, do you take inspiration from anyone?

I’m big into feedback loops , I like listening to Ariana acapella tracks , I’m honoured to be surrounded by people as talented as Anastassia Radtsenko IceBoy Violet, Acre, Forrest Lloyd ,Hesska MICHAELBRAILEY, Szare ; Manchester is fertile atm.

You’re known for having a really unique mixing style, how did you develop this and what is your process in choosing tracks and creating new pieces?

When I was 17 I was a vinyl purist , I’ve done a lot of live “ controllerist “ live sets . I hope I can offer something more dynamic than either of the above these days . Honestly I’m just scrambling for the next tune that will make any ( or no ) sense against the preceding track . 

 

There seems to be almost a theatrical element about you at the decks. Did you intend to integrate performance into your sets?

I get drunk and write poems sometimes and occasionally I perform these to an audience . My main aspiration is to make people feel so included that tears roll from their little eyes . 

Queer Femme producers are at the forefront of the Manchester electronic music scene at the moment, with Castles in the Sky seeming to be paving the way. Have you found solidarity and support through other queers at the top of the game?

Yes absolutely, I would argue that queerness requires no explicity and as such most of the people that have chosen to work with me over the last couple years are at least “ queer sympathisers “ . Love and support is strongest feeling I get from everyone I work with. 

How have you experienced being visibly queer in the nightlife//club scene?

Y’no what ? it’s been alright , sure I experience some weird stereotyping and code switching ( I always find it funny when someone’s like “ Oh honneeeeyyyy “ and I’m ale drunk and respond in a fairly deep northern vernacular ) but within my surrounding club culture I feel pretty safe . The bad shit happens outside of that . 

 

loft22

 

From your experience playing around the UK and abroad, how do you think queer nightlife can be improved?

More queer spaces in cities outside London . Manchester has a huge gay scene but , as I’m sure we all know , queer =/= gay . BOYGIRL we building it .

So, what would your queer-utopia look like? 

Cop out answer : I couldn’t possibly comprehend . I’d make a comment about it requiring the pursuit of each individual’s ideals but that sounds a bit Randian now doesn’t it ?!

Finally, what can we expect from your premier DJ set at DSS?

Fun , tears , hugging each other , maybe a couple minutes white noise .Honestly I’m so honoured to have been invited.

 


Catch LOFT at MegaLast: LOFT, KRY, NI-KU, ELLES + J.ARIA this Friday at Dalston Superstore 9pm-3am!

 

Jess Farley (Rhythm Sister)

For the second instalment of heauxmeauxsexy disco Mints for 2018, the all-nonsense party crew invite the Rhythm Sister Collective to take over the laser hole for start to finish! The all female / non binary DJ collective have also programmed an open decks session before the party kicks off called The Floor Is Yours, in order to give any new DJs amongst us the chance to play out. Known for delectably eclectic selections spanning world sounds, house, disco, techno, breaks and beyond, we can’t wait to see what they unleash at Mints! We caught up with founder Jess Farley to chat the changing climate of equality in dance music, favourite female selectors and Albanian summer festivals!
 

 
Hey Jess! We are so excited to have you join us for Mints! Can you tell us a little bit about yourself for those who might not know you?
 
Hello! I’m Jess Farley. I’m a DJ and the founder of Rhythm Sister. I’ve moved back to Bristol after being in London for six years, I have two cats and I also run my own business in marketing & social media for creative brands such as artists, labels and events.
 
What inspired you to start the Rhythm Sister Platform?
 
From my personal experience of learning to DJ, and also from speaking to a lot of other women who were going through the same. I found there was a common feeling of nervousness and a lack of self confidence in the process and feeling like music and the ‘scene’ was out of reach and not accessible to them. I think this is a combination of a lack of role models, socialisation of women from a young age, plus the male domination in the scene. So Rhythm Sister was about creating a community and space for women to feel comfortable to learn more about music and DJing from others, and for it to feel in reach for them. Alongside serving as a platform to help shine a light on more talented women and non binary artists, it exists to inspire others and help increase the amount of role models there are. And hopefully it’s doing that :)
 
Music is obviously a huge part of your life. What is your earliest musical memory, and what has really shaped your love for dance music in particular?
 
I don’t remember this first hand but my Mum said when I was like one or two my favourite song was Technotronic – Pump Up The Jam and I used to go mental dancing in my nappy every time it came on haha! I think what’s shaped my love for dance music in particular has to be growing up in Glastonbury and going to the festival since I was young, drinking pear cider and roaming around all the tents by myself, it was pretty eye opening! There was also a big drum and bass scene when I was a teenager so I was listening to that and raving in fields since I was like 14! I guess my love for house, techno and dance music in general developed over the years from this.
 
You have done some incredible work to level the playing field for female and non binary DJs – we really admire your work! Have you experienced much of a shift in people’s attitudes since you first started? 
 
Aw thanks :) A huge credit goes to all the Rhythm Sister crew and extended crew who’ve helped and supported along the way. Yes 100% I think attitudes have shifted and are shifting. There’s still a way to go but the conversation of equality seems to be at the forefront in music at the moment. There are more women and non binary artists on line ups, more and more are finding the confidence to DJ and produce, and more initiatives, collectives and nights run by women are popping up! I think there is way less stigma, although it definitely still exists, but I think over the years all the work we’re putting in now will hopefully come to fruition and the scene will continue to unearth all the talented people that have been hiding or have gone unnoticed. 
 
Do you find it really different to play to a queer or female dominated audience compared to the typical straight cis-male electronic music crowd?
 
There is definitely some type of magic and feeling in the air that exists in queer / female dominated spaces that you can’t really explain. It’s not really the absence of straight cis-males, it’s more an energy that’s created when people are truly feeling free and safe to be themselves, to dance and have fun, not being nervous and contained, which I think happens more in straight cis-male crowds. The openness and freedom is inspiring – we need it more! I think this is also achievable in mixed crowds, it’s like a mutual respect for everyone you share the space with. 
 
You will be running a party for beginner DJs before Mints kicks off, can you tell us a bit about it?
 
Ever since we started our workshops we have really wanted to set up a night for attendees to be able to perform in a club environment. It’s the next step from practising at home, to help them develop flow, read the crowd and be able to invite their friends to see them play out. It can do wonders for confidence and really help cement the nice and empowering feeling that DJing gives you, and hopefully it can be the stepping stone for future gigs! We’ll have four x 45 minute sets that run from 7pm – 10pm before Mints kicks off, and we’re announcing the line up soon! 
 
Who are some of your favourite female and non binary B DJs who are really killing it at the moment? 
 
Ah soooo many. London-based up and coming artists: Peach who’s just released on Midland’s label Intergraded is smashing it, Kiara Scuro, Jaye Ward, Anu, Rachael who works for Rye Wax and Five Miles is a wicked selector and is putting on some great parties and doing lots of good things for the scene, all of the artists involved in Siren are putting out great music and mixes. In Bristol: the BWiM artists Em Williams, Daisy Moon and Danielle are amazing and my friend Kiia is going to go on to great things. Further afield: Gwenan, rRoxymore, Margarat Dygas, Helena Hauff, Nina Kraviz of course. On the more jazzy, selector vibes: Donna Leake, Mafalda (just listened to her Dekmantel mix), Lauren Hansom from Australia. I literally could go on and on!!!
 
Who are some of the guests you have invited to join you for the basement takeover?
 
Jaye Ward has the best selection I’ve heard in a while, have heard many of her radio shows and a few mixes, literally can’t wait to finally meet her and hear her play in the club!! Souvenir are also two very talented DJ and selectors who played one of the best warm up sets I’ve seen at our party at Rye Wax for Peckham Rye Festival last year. Plus can’t wait to combine forces with Mints, should be a cracking one!!
 
Do you have any exciting plans in the pipeline that you can let us in on?
 
Ooo… we have a few exciting gigs coming up this summer! Most looking forward to playing at Kala in Albania – it looks so stunning. Plus there’s a new mix series and we’re soon to be rolling out a new mentorship scheme!
 
And finally, in five words or less, what are you planning to unleash on the Superstore basement?
 
Drums, breaks, ALL THE FUN!

Catch Jess Farley and Rhythm Sister at Mints this Friday 6 April from 9pm-3am at Dalston Superstore! 
 
mints at dalston superstore

Muff Magazine

Ahead of the launch party tomorrow night for Muff, the London based queer print magazine, we caught up with the two ladies behind the publication to find out a bit more about what’s in the latest issue and why they do what they do…
 
Muff Magazine came to global acclaim with its moving photo series of lesbian couples living in Russia, together despite the difficult circumstances. What led you to commission this and were you surprised by the attention it received?
 
Bukanova: I wouldn’t have dreamed of the story going viral! With muff we want to change the way lesbians are represented in today’s media and challenge out of date stereotypes. Therefore I wanted to portrait couples in the intimate environment of their own home, showing that they chop onions, watch TV  and do everything a straight couple would do. Originally from Russia myself, I’m very touched and upset about its anti-gay propaganda and the consequences, which I think can improve if gay becomes – and remains – more visible. It might be hard to accept the unfamiliar, but having to deal with it on a daily basis will hopefully, one day, make it the accepted and normal thing it is.
 
KateBukanova struck up a friendship with the photographer Anastasia Ivanova while she was in London and basically the next thing I knew they’d created a photo series together. After that, all I had to do was bring the photos to life with a few words from the subjects themselves. As soon as the Huffington Post and BuzzFeed took it, our inboxes just went crazy. I still can’t believe how far that piece travelled – it really made an impact. Even now, over six months later, I still come across the most unlikeliest of people who want to talk about that photo series.
 
Now that the spotlight is for the most part off Russia’s treatment of LGBT people, do you think this is something you hope to highlight again in the future? Perhaps revisiting the same couples?
 
Bukanova: Maybe. We are very grateful to have the couples and thank them for standing up despite the fact that a majority tries to silence them. I think, for now, we made our point. 
 
Kate: Perhaps in a few years when things have hopefully changed – but not for now. I think we made a really strong point with the piece and I wouldn’t want to dilute its message by banging the drum too much. Anyway, the whole point of muff is that we try not to overly politicise issues, particularly negative ones. In the new issue, we have a different photo series, still based around people but this time about those who moved to Berlin and why. It’s a really beautiful, emotional piece which hopefully has a more positive vibe.
 
You’ve stated the next issue of Muff Magazine is a bit less political… why did you choose Lovecats as a theme?
 
Bukanova: Because everything isn’t that serious. And we love cats, of course. 
 
KateMainly because Bukanova and Piczo shot a beautiful fashion editorial with her favourite, sphinx cats. But, yes, also because we wanted more of a lighthearted, upbeat feel to this issue – and creatively we felt a lot more confident to express that this time, both in the content and design. 
 
Why did you both choose to champion print as a medium? 
 
Bukanova: Form follows content, and muff isn’t a trend-led magazine. It is illustrating stories, picturing the life of individuals and reflecting on issues in our society – I think this is a beautiful thing to last. 
 
Kate: Because print is beautiful – you can savour and share magazines in a way that you just can’t with the immediacy of the web. Things like content, photography and texture shape a really strong statement and I think muff really deserved that kind of medium. You know, you can make a really great website and it can have the biggest audience in the world, but it will never endure like print and one day, who knows whether that website will still be online? Financially, of course, it’s not that simple… 
 
Muff Magazine seeks to redefine “lesbian”  through an exploration of queer culture- what would say exemplifies that ethos in the latest issue?
 
BukanovaThe deliberate choice to avoid stereotypes. Not because of personal taste, but more the will to challenge existing perceptions.
 
KateWe try to explore queer issues and creatives without focusing on sexuality – because it doesn’t really matter whether somebody is gay or not. In the latest issue, we look at creatives who have moved to Berlin. I can tell you now that some of them happen to be gay, but at no point do we feel the need to mention that or define their work through it. We also have a couple of amazing interviews, with people like Jake Arnott and Molly Nilsson, as well as our own take on the famous Barilla pasta controversy. Virginia Woolf makes an appearance too. 
 
What are your personal favourite pieces of enduring queer literature or art?
 
BukanovaI never thought of literature or art to be solely queer.
 
What would you improve or change about London’s LGBT scene?
 
KateWhen I was young and single I loved London’s gay scene. From what I remember, I have to say it’s one of the best in the world – there’s something for everyone. Nowadays I don’t tend to frequent it so much and if I find myself in a gay bar it’s unlikely I’m in there solely because it’s gay. Maybe I’d change the beer selection…
 
Who are the Muff Magazine icons (and why)?
 
BukanovaFellow independent publishers like The Gourmand and Buffalo Zine.
 
KateI come to muff from a slightly more serious, editorial background so for me, my personal icons are people like Glenn Greenwald, George Monbiot, Naomi Klein. Muff-wise, I’d say we took a lot of hope and inspiration from magazines like BUTT and Girls Like Us. 
 
What’s your favourite feature each in the new issue?
 
BukanovaThe cats, gay pasta, our still life follow-up that can be seen here, a visual diary of past crushes, and our collaboration with Berlin based creatives. Did I mention cats?
 
KateI’d say it’s a toss up between Partner Look, which is our response to the Barilla pasta affair that we came up with over the kitchen table one rainy afternoon, and the Berlin photo series. 
 
As this is an interview for Dalston Superstore and we are all about dancefloors… if you had a time machine and could go back in time to any dancefloor anywhen/anywhere where would you want to go?
 
BukanovaIn the ’80s, somewhere between a gig of the Russian band Kino, Klaus Nomi – or  just dancing to Pet Shop Boys, Grace Jones & co, wearing tons of make-up, studded over knee boots and über-oversized jumpers.
 
Kate: 1920’s swing? I basically spent my entire childhood wishing I’d been in the Bloomsbury Group. 
 
Muff Launch
 
For more info on the launch of issue 2 of Muff Magazine tomorrow night visit their Facebook page.

Planningtorock

Planningtorock is Janine Rostron, a Bolton-native who now lives in Berlin. Making experimental electronic music, she uses distorted vocals to create an androgynous sound. Sophie Wilkinson caught up with her to discuss music, the queer scene, what feminism looks like these days and why she probably won’t be playing Daft Punk’s Get Lucky in her set.

What do you like about the Twat parties?

When I DJed at Twat last year, it was mind-blowing and raucous. I just love the vibe, the crowd were amazing. That night Trust played and during his set a girl mounted the stage, stole the mic and started to rant. I don’t know what she was saying but it was exciting and fun.

After the critically acclaimed album ‘W’, where would you say your new material is going at the moment, what can we expect?

With two singles that have been very obviously direct and political, I thought, “Does this mean that the whole album has to be this way?” And of course no, not at all. It’ll be more political but also extremely playful. It’s going to be really direct but happier. Not that W was negative, but it was quite heavy. On a musical level, it’s definitely going to be more dancey. I want to dance on stage when I tour the next album.

How has DJing shaped the music you’re making? Is that why it’s dancier?

DJing was a product of Planningtorock and I love it. It definitely has an affect and it’s a healthy thing to do. When you’re DJing, you have the immediate reaction to the music right there in front of you. It’s a great thing to share.

What do you think of Daft Punk’s new single, as they’ve seemed to create an ode to disco with this album, but from the sleevenotes, they’ve not collaborated with a woman?

I’m astounded that everyone’s saying that Daft Punk are going in a new musical direction. For me it’s something very familiar and it just doesn’t connect with me at all. I read somewhere that someone was saying “This is a new musical direction” and I was quite flabbergasted. I had a chuckle to myself then I didn’t think more about it.

You’ve got a massive queer fanbase, what does that mean to you and your music?

It’s massive to me because of lot of the issues that I’m dealing with and the community has to deal with. We need our supportive comfort zone because you’re completely under attack for even mentioning some of these topics.

Do you think the queer scene is changing and getting more of a voice?

When I started out in 2006, feminism was the bad word and there was an animosity when you talked about some of these things. I found it scary when I just started to perform. That doesn’t happen so much now. I’m very good friends with Peaches and it was so important for me to be around female performers who were strong and had the guts to be unpopular.

Do you think feminism’s going somewhere good and it’s in an alright state? It seems as if anyone who tries to make moves somewhere with it gets taken down for not doing it right.

Feminism is and should be an ongoing transforming entity, and it’s depressing and almost frightening how capitalism and politics have changed it and uses it. I think a lot of inter-gender politics have evolved and they’ve changed and it’s our responsibility to inform ourselves. I find it exciting that people seem to be talking about it a lot more in the past five years.

It’ll be interesting to see what change is brought about through this feminism.

The gender politics in Germany are different to England. They’re not amazing but they are definitely better, because 1970s feminism had an effect on German culture, and laws. And the impact wasn’t as strong in England. It’s a goal that feminism manages to change laws and improve things on a day-to-day basis. That’s what I try to do with Patriarchy Over And Out. I just sat there and thought “Patriarchy is such a stupid, dumbass concept, I can’t believe that it still exists. It was never a good idea so let’s get rid of it. It should just go away because it makes the world suck.” And it’s the same for misogyny. It should be in everybody’s will to get rid of it. But how to actually make that translate in real terms is a goal, I guess.

Living It Out from planningtorock on Vimeo.

Images and content courtesy of the Twat Boutique website. Words by Sophie Wilkinson.
 
Join Planningtorock tonight, Thursday 2nd May at Dalston Superstore for Twat Boutique from 9pm – 4:30am.

States by Jacob Love

NEW PHOTOGRAPHY WORKS FROM JACOB LOVE

20.04.2012 – 3.06.2012 

PRIVATE VIEW THURSDAY 19th APRIL 7pm

Through images of stunning natural America and a group of unique mysterious characters, Dalston Superstore presents States a new body of work by artist Jacob Love.

In Spring 2011, Love embarked on a road trip across America that culminated at a stay in a rural queer community. As he interacted with the living realities of both the community and the landscape around it, an alternative view of the American dream began to form. Here Love presents images where the realities of resistance and change fuse with fantasy and a ’new world’ becomes fully realized.

Love presents a series of landscapes and portraits that through colour, positioning and framing, subvert traditional notions of America in beautiful yet occasionally shocking ways.

The landscapes are presented framed upside down. By inverting these images and removing all human traces from them, Love turns back time, creating magical Utopian worlds that the viewer steps into blinking, blinded by the sun that confronts them. But are these worlds really from the past or perhaps a vision of America’s post capitalist future?

These disorienting and magnetic landscapes are accompanied by a 10 metre panorama that- presented the correct way up – introduces a new visual language to the work on display, one of traditional pastorialism. It is only on closer inspection that the lone figure in the landscape presents himself to you. As you engage with him further you begin to see that he is dressed as a gogo boy, engrossed in his own self-pleasure. Both his virile (and possibly feral) activity and the shocking pink of his leggings jar uncomfortably with his lush and somehow innocent surroundings. As with the inversion of the landscapes, our lone masturbator works to subvert our understanding of the American landscape and how we interact with the world of nature that surrounds us.

At the far end of the bar, illuminated on light boxes are the possible inhabitants of this new world; a collection of people emerging from darkness, perhaps stepping into the sunlight of the inverted landscapes. As with the figure in the large image on the main wall, these personalities embody an alternative, queer idealism at odds with the conservative country they now call home, yet they are embracing the foundations on which America was built and also offering the best blueprint for it’s future.

States will be exhibited at Dalston Superstore from Friday the 20th of April till the 3rd of June 2012. private view is Thursday 19th April 2012 from 7pm

For more information visit: www.jacoblove.net